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Fajitas on the Egg

RodPullmanRodPullman Posts: 0
edited August 2012 in EggHead Forum
Had just under a pound each of skirt steak and flat iron steak. Marinated both for approximately 6 hours using Alton Brown's 5-star recipe (soy sauce, EVOO, onions, garlic, lime juice, red pepper flakes, cumin, brown sugar, run through a blender until uniform consistency). Grilled sliced peppers and onions to perfection on BGE griddle (Note to BGE: *Please make a griddle to fit XL Egg!*), seared steaks on cast iron grate, about 1 minute per side. Let rest, then sliced across grain and served with warm freshly baked flour tortillas. Amazing flavor!!

One important lesson I learned: from now on I'll be using only flat-iron steaks and saying adios to skirt steak. Both have great flavor, but the flat iron steaks are incomparably tender, not stringy like skirt steak.

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Comments

  • NibbleMeThisNibbleMeThis Posts: 2,246
    I know it might be heresy but I prefer flat iron and flank steak to skirt steak for my fajitas. 

    Glad you enjoyed yours!  I haven't tried AB's recipe, I'll have to give it a shot.

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  • BjorgBjorg Posts: 233
    I am going to try fajitas this week end for 8 people. I wanted to try that famous flat iron steak and went out of my way to find one downtown Montreal. The butcher told me to cook it direct at 250, and not seared like recommended here and on nibblemethis blog. He said it would turn hard if cooked fast (500f). He said it would end up like pulled pork after 3-4 hours if cooked slowly.

    Very different from my original intention! I found this article explaining the difference a bit. http://oneblockwest.blogspot.ca/2008/04/paleron-my-favorite-cut-of-beef.html 

    So the big question is should i cut them, removing the cartilage in the middle and grill them?

    I was planning on trying the nibblemethis recipe: http://www.nibblemethis.com/2010/04/steak-fajitas.html

    Here is the cut of meat
    Quebec - Canada
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  • BjorgBjorg Posts: 233
    Damn, I just found a french article saying that only the top part can be grilled. Source: http://www.boucheriedezecot.fr/boucherie-en-ligne-dezecot-boeuf.html?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&category_id=1&product_id=17

    Translation
    The chuck is primarily a piece that must simmer for hours. But it also makes excellent steaks condition be trimmed by the butcher. This piece regular shoulder is near the collar.

    This muscle fiber is short and thin through the middle by a major nerve. To cook chuck pot-au-feu or braising, allowed the world.

    For grilling, the butcher opens in two to remove the fascia and serves only the top piece. The bottom part, firmer, is used for steak chopped or cut into chunks for stews.


    If I just keep the top half, I likely wont have enough for everybody (6 adults, 6 x 3-6 yo kids). I dont have time to go back to Montreal. Pulled marinated beef fajitas??? lol I would welcome any suggestions at this point. Maybe freeze the lower part for later braising and buy flank steak to complement??
    Quebec - Canada
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  • SMITTYtheSMOKERSMITTYtheSMOKER Posts: 2,284
    edited September 2012

    I really like the 1/2 moon cast iron, use it all the time.  Great for Fajitas.

     

    Here is a pic from one of our customer's fajita cooks.

    image

     

    -SMITTY     

    from SANTA CLARA, CA

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  • Don't trust Canadian butchers on how to grill fajitas. Just sayin.

    Hot and fast with good marinade for all the cuts you listed above is the way to go.

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  • Bjorg said:

    Damn, I just found a french article saying that only the top part can be grilled. Source: http://www.boucheriedezecot.fr/boucherie-en-ligne-dezecot-boeuf.html?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&category_id=1&product_id=17


    Translation
    The chuck is primarily a piece that must simmer for hours. But it also makes excellent steaks condition be trimmed by the butcher. This piece regular shoulder is near the collar.

    This muscle fiber is short and thin through the middle by a major nerve. To cook chuck pot-au-feu or braising, allowed the world.

    For grilling, the butcher opens in two to remove the fascia and serves only the top piece. The bottom part, firmer, is used for steak chopped or cut into chunks for stews.


    If I just keep the top half, I likely wont have enough for everybody (6 adults, 6 x 3-6 yo kids). I dont have time to go back to Montreal. Pulled marinated beef fajitas??? lol I would welcome any suggestions at this point. Maybe freeze the lower part for later braising and buy flank steak to complement??
    I didn't even read this on but I think French articles may be the only thing worse than Candian butchers when learning to grill Mexican food. Trust me, marinade, then cook hot and fast. I have made fajitas/carne assda every week for 20 years and they usually turn out ok. Use flank, skirt, ribeye, or flap and you will be very happy.


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  • llrickmanllrickman Posts: 510
    edited September 2012
    I make them quite a bit using flank or skirt,  Grill real hot and fast as you said and cut against the grain and they come out delicious

    Edit: i will be trying in the near future with flat iron though
    One LBGE
    Digi Q
    green Thermapen
    AR

    Albuquerque, NM
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  • llrickman said:

    I make them quite a bit using flank or skirt,  Grill real hot and fast as you said and cut against the grain and they come out delicious

    Good call. Against the grain on flank, skirt, and flap are critical to good fajitas.

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  • MickeyMickey Posts: 16,179
    Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos
    Salado TX Egg Family: 2 Large and a very well used Mini, just added a Mini Max (I'm good for now). 

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  • BjorgBjorg Posts: 233
    Ok Im gonna trust you guys and cut it length wise and remove the middle membrane to grill it like steaks. Upon serving I will cut thin strips against the grain. I hope its tender!
    Quebec - Canada
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  • ribnrunribnrun Posts: 174
    I have been finding thin sliced bottom sirloin at the grocery store. Cheap, $1.99/lb, and it comes out fairly tender. Looked at it and thought it would work for fajitas. Cooks so fast that it takes no time to whip em up. An odd cut to use, but I'm not paying $9/lb for skirt. I still slice against the grain, but you could just pull it apart and throw it on the tortillas too.
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  • GriffinGriffin Posts: 6,776
    I thought Alton Brown's method for fajitas was cooking it caveman style right on top of the lump charcoal. I could be wrong, but I do remember seeing a video of him cooking some type of beef right on the coals.

    Richardson, Texas

    Griffin's Grub or you can find me on Facebook

    The Supreme Potentate, Sovereign Commander and Sultan of Wings

     

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  • GriffinGriffin Posts: 6,776
    edited September 2012

    Took me a bit, but found it.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LLDoYI6pWwk

    Richardson, Texas

    Griffin's Grub or you can find me on Facebook

    The Supreme Potentate, Sovereign Commander and Sultan of Wings

     

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  • BjorgBjorg Posts: 233
    I undercooked it a bit and it was not tender, but eatable. I was to scared of overcooking it. Oh well, live and learn!
    Quebec - Canada
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