Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
There are two very delicious food holidays coming up that we wanted to share with you all because cheese and guac deserve to be celebrated! Guacamole Day is on September 16th and Cheeseburger Day is on September 18th. Happy cooking EGGheads! It's time to think about getting out to one of the many #EGGfests around the country - see a list here

Pizza Crust

CWarrenCWarren Posts: 5
edited August 2012 in Baking
I have been trying to perfect the whole pizza thing and can't get my crust as thin as I would like with few bubbles.  I buy the fresh Publix dough balls and use half.  Do ya'll suggest rolling the dough with a rolling pin?  How do you get it flat and stay there without being springy?  Thanks for any help.


Comments

  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 5,736
    No experience with Publix dough, because I make my own,but here is what I have learned. 
    Fresh dough, has gone thru its first rise and then punched down, will need a little kneading and resting or it will be difficult to shape and stretch. If it is "springy", walk away for at least 10 minutes, come back and see if it will shape for you. Make sure your Publix dough is up to room temp, out of the fridge for at least an hour or two. 

    I make dough for three 13" pies at one time using our stand mixer, basically this link:
    If used fresh, this makes a more bread styled crust, not what you want, but if you freeze it after the first rise and punch down, then let it thaw in the fridge, the crust is thinner, chewier. 

    Much differnt process then I usually use, but this article from America's Test Kitchen was an eye opener for me on how to get a workable thin crust, take a look, it may help you as well. 

    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 15,936
    like was said, let it warm up longer and if its still to springy let it sit there still longer. i can sqeak out three pies from a dough ball but its pusing it, its better to cut off a little less than a quarter and cut the rest in half for two pies. the leftover you can add a bunch of garlic and herbs and just toss it in. tossing the pie gives more a bubbly cooked crust, rolling thin you can get a more cracker crust but its always denser
  • CWarrenCWarren Posts: 5
    Great info and resources.   Resting time is the key that I think I have been missing.


  • LowflyerLowflyer Posts: 677
    I'm using 2 Publix dough balls tonight myself, we shall see how it goes. Using parchment paper for the 1st time and no cornmeal.
  • Doc_EggertonDoc_Eggerton Posts: 3,919
    Make sure it has enough time to get to room temp, but don't leave it out for hours.  I use Publix dough, and prefer white, not multigrain.

    I roll it with flour and a marble rolling pin.

    Do not cook it hotter than the recommended 400, and make sure the stone and dome are well heated.  Raise the stone, and turn the pie every 5 minutes.
    2 5 minutes, pull parchement.JPG
    3648 x 2736 - 2M
    6 Thin and crispy.JPG
    3648 x 2736 - 2M
    3 Done.JPG
    3648 x 2736 - 2M
    Pasquali Luciano
    Buon appetito to all the BGE family
    XLBGE, LBGE, MBGE and lots of toys

  • JHazardJHazard Posts: 18
    If anyone is in Dallas I use dough from Jimmy's Italian Market and it's the best I've had. I roll out to desired thickness on my granite and throw on the egg at 750-800 degrees for 3-4 minutes...perfect!
  • Try a pizza docker to deal with bubbles
  • SamFerriseSamFerrise Posts: 544
    Some of the bloggers here have called me the "Pizza Nazi", a name I am proud of.  I realize everyone has their own style, however, some of the things I have seen and read on the forum pages have made me gnash my teeth.  You will never come close to matching the results of a true Neopolitan style oven.  That said, now you are cooking pizza in the Egg.  I just read about some Egger who had his rig up to 1200 degrees.  Well I wonder if that is a true temp.  In my humble opinion, I do not think the Egg or its components could take a cook that hot with out some ill effects.  Over time you will cause a lot of wear and tear on all the parts.  Most pizza shops cook their pies in the 550-600 degree range in the brick lined ovens. Blodgett or Baker's Pride are the ovens used in 95% of the pizza shops.  The high volume shops have to use conveyor ovens that blow jets of heat from below and above.  Typical cook time is roughly 6 minutes.  The wood fired Pizza Ovens get super hot, well over 1000 degrees.  They cook the thin crust pizza with sparse toppings in 2 minutes or less.

    I can take all the criticism you guys dish out, but in this area of cooking I have few peers.  I like to pass on my knowledge, so please do not perceive me as arrogant.  If you want to use store bought dough you will get what you pay for.  That dough is not designed for wood fired cooking. You will get a decent pie.  All pizza is basically good, some are just much more superior because the people who make the good stuff know their ingredients and how to combine them. I come from people who made everything from scratch.  I work with proven recipes that have stood the test of time and taste.  I will share them with anyone who wishes to learn a different bend in pizza making.  I hope you all have a great Labor Day weekend.  I will be doing a 14.5 lb packer brisket.  Pictures will be posted later.

    Caio,

    Sam    

    Simple ingredients, amazing results!
  • AleBrewerAleBrewer Posts: 555
    Sam,

    When I do pizza dough, I do a NY style dough with high gluten flour and let my dough sit overnight(24hrs) in the fridge.

    I'm a traditionalist in that I like a simple home-made sauce made from San Marzano tomatoes, mozzarella, and real pepperoni....the kind that you have to slice yourself, and it curls up when you cook it. I don't care for the pre-sliced stuff from the grocery store.

    I'd like to see your method and dough recipe if you care to share it.

    Doc's pizza looks pretty good in those pics above!
  • paqmanpaqman Posts: 992
    edited September 2012
    @SamFerrise I did not perceive any arrogance in your post.  I felt like the information you shared was interesting.  However, I have a hard time understanding how you can be proud to be qualified of nazi...

    Arrogance is telling someone looking for advice that he should not be touching dough...  Arrogance is telling someone that his recipe is not good because you consider that only yours is good.

    Some people consider that adding anything else than flour, water, salt and yeast to pizza dough is a sacrilege.  Some others add milk powder or egg yolks to change the texture... I have been looking for years for the perfect recipe and I finally found the one I was looking for thanks to @nolaegghead and this forum. 

    I would love to know your pizza dough recipe.


    :)>-

    ____________________
    Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage. •Niccolo Machiavelli
  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 5,736
    edited September 2012
    AleBrewer said:
    Sam,

    When I do pizza dough, I do a NY style dough with high gluten flour and let my dough sit overnight(24hrs) in the fridge.

    I'm a traditionalist in that I like a simple home-made sauce made from San Marzano tomatoes, mozzarella, and real pepperoni....the kind that you have to slice yourself, and it curls up when you cook it. I don't care for the pre-sliced stuff from the grocery store.

    I'd like to see your method and dough recipe if you care to share it.

    Doc's pizza looks pretty good in those pics above!
    Agreed on Doc's pie - looks good to me. 
    Your comment on NY style in the fridge overnight is the gist of the America's test Kitchen link I posted above, something about cold and not so much yeast results in an easy to work dough. Don't need to understand it, just that it works.

    In Canada we seem to have different flour than in the US. I can get 40# of high gluten Roger's Silver Star for <$13, works well for pizza.
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • Doc_EggertonDoc_Eggerton Posts: 3,919
    edited September 2012


    In Canada ......
    Cracklin Rose wine, and Labatt.  My parents lived for several years in Palgrave, Ontario.  My father was the NASA rep on the Canada Arm project.

    Pasquali Luciano
    Buon appetito to all the BGE family
    XLBGE, LBGE, MBGE and lots of toys

  • Pulled the parchment paper at 4 min into the cook=perfect!! 12-14min total at 650 dome temp worked great. Sorry no pic of the bottom of the crust. Wife loved it!!!Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos
  • paqmanpaqman Posts: 992
    Looks good!

    ____________________
    Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage. •Niccolo Machiavelli
  • Doc - Ahhh Labatt 50 ale, not available in BC, every trip east I bring a case home. The local IPAs and those from the US Pacific Coast are easing the pain of not being able to get "Cinquante" here, but you never forget your first love.....

    Small world, my Dad was from Beaverton (later Keswick) just east of Palgrave.
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • My chosen pizza dough recipe has a tendency to bubble while cooking. I had one pizza that developed a HUGE bubble along one side and all the toppings slide toward the other side. I soon discovered that if I lightly tapped the crust all over with a table fork before adding toppings, it prevents bubbles. I don't poke all the way through the crust, just tap lightly - maybe half way through. Just a quick idea for you to try.
  • twlangan said:
    My chosen pizza dough recipe has a tendency to bubble while cooking. I had one pizza that developed a HUGE bubble along one side and all the toppings slide toward the other side. I soon discovered that if I lightly tapped the crust all over with a table fork before adding toppings, it prevents bubbles. I don't poke all the way through the crust, just tap lightly - maybe half way through. Just a quick idea for you to try.
    You can buy a tool called a dough docker, but a fork does the same thing, good tip. Best way I've found to avoid big bubbles is use less yeast, punch down after first rise, let it rise again, knead a bit and then let it sit for 10 15 minutes before you stretch, no bubbles. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • I would change recipes.  You may be using a recipe that is good for bread, but not pizza.  Most pizza dough is made with higher gluten flours.  The right amount of yeast is another factor as well as a few other simple ingredients.  A small batch of dough using a 1 kilo bag of "00" flour should be mixed with a dough hook for 10 - 12 minutes.  The gluten begins to concentrate and gives the dough great elasticity.  After the initial mixing and raising for 1-2 hours, I roll it out and immediately refrigerate it where it will further proof, but at a slower rate.  I always make my dough at least 1 day in advance.  No huge bubbles and no docking required.

    Simple ingredients, amazing results!
Sign In or Register to comment.