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Turbo Beef Brisket?

Hungry in LilburnHungry in Lilburn Posts: 756
edited March 2012 in EggHead Forum
I have 2 days off unexpectedly due to yet another back injury at work this week. I am limited to working on computer and eating.

My wife is on way home with another beef brisket from real butcher shop. She loves my brisket but it is my worst cook. I suck at it. Today, she plans to be home by 12 and wants me to be able to have one ready for supper at 7 pm.. So, any experts want to give me some advice on how to cook this? I am thinking 350 until 210. The deckle is always juicy and my favorite and the flat is always close to dry. I do separate the deckle from the flat. s

Thanks
«1

Comments

  • travisstricktravisstrick Posts: 5,001
    Wow big is the brisket? is it trimmed yet? 
    Be careful, man! I've got a beverage here.
  • I think I saw somewhere thatTravis has a good way to do it fast. I'm all low and slow when it comes to Brisket but there are ways to do it. His 1/2 braise/1/2 smoke (if I remember right) seems like a good idea.

    I can hook you up with killer low and slow brisket so give me a shout if you want some pointers. 
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  • JasonPJasonP Posts: 9
    350 until brisket reaches 165. Foil and pull off @195. Rest in cooler for an hour.
  • Thanks all! Butcher was out. Doing Turbo Butt instead. Cen-Tex, would love to have tips for low and slow brisket. Will do one on Friday night.  Thanks!
  • OK- I'll write it up for you today. I use a V-Rack and a drip pan for mine. Do you have that setup?
    Keeping it Weird in the ATX
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  • OK- The attached pic is
    a butt but the setup is exactly the same. I'll make a few assumptions here to
    save some time. 

     

    1) you have a large or
    XL egg.  

    2) You have a plate
    setter, V-Rack, 13"x9" disposable foil pan (or your equivalent of
    each) .  

    3) You have a way to
    raise that pan off the plate setter. 

    4) You totally clean out
    your egg before the cook (yes, you have to pull everything out and sweep it
    out). 

    5) You
    are comfortable with building a good fire that will hold rock solid
    while you sleep.

    6) That you understand
    the anatomy of the brisket and that a brisket is actually 2 muscle groups (the
    point and the flat) that have grains that run in different directions. 

    7)  That you know
    how to properly trim the brisket once it's cooked. If you don't cut it right,
    it's just as bad as not cooking it right.

     

     I'll touch on the
    basics of all of it but if you need more detail, let me know and we'll work
    through it.

     

    The Meat: Can't cook without meat so let's go
    shopping first: I only buy choice grade (when available) whole packer cut
    briskets (they are usually 12-20lbs) in the cryo. I found that most briskets
    will fit on a V-rack but some of the larger ones hang over the edges. This is
    fine and I have even had to trim a few inches off the flats on some of the
    really large ones to fit my Lg. Egg. Most fit perfectly on a v-Rack into a
    large Egg.  I never buy flats and I NEVER
    buy anything trimmed. You can get good results with flats, but the point is
    where the best marbling and flavor are. I've also found that my flats
    are moister when I cook whole briskets. And Never buy those
    3-5 lb cuts that the butchers have trimmed up at the store. These are for
    braising or making corned beef. There is no amount of low and slow you can do
    to these to make them moist or palatable as BBQ. The fat cap matters
    so if you can see too much of the meat grain on the fat side, don't buy it.
    There may be a few spots that have been trimmed down to the grain, but i prefer
    the most fat cap coverage that I can find. That way I can trim them the way I like
    them. You can go find a $100 CAB or "Prime" brisket if you have
    access but I honestly can't tell the difference between these and a choice
    brisket if you cook them right. I try to avoid select grade briskets, but I've
    done them plenty when it's all I could find and they turned out great. Here is
    what I look for: A brisket (choice or above if available) with a nice thick fat
    cap that covers almost all the grain on the fat side. I also look for a brisket
    that is "floppy" when holding the thicker part of the brisket (the
    flat should fold a little when holding this way). I also look that it does not
    have any clotted blood, discoloration, or weird looking spots. I
    think this is all so I can look like I know what the hell I'm doing without
    actually knowing for sure that any of these things actually make any
    difference. To me, a brisket is like a set of golf clubs in the hands of a good
    pro. A good pro will whip your ass with 25 year old set of clubs bought at a
    pawn shop while you hack around with your shiny $2000 Callaway's!. A good
    brisket guy can get a lot out of most briskets so I wouldn't freak out if you
    live in an area that does not sell these boutique grades of brisket. Look for
    choice grades and play around with others if you can find them. Take select grade
    whole packers if you have to but don’t bother using anything trimmed up. You
    can use flats if that’s all you have available, but for me, I would rather do
    pulled pork than a brisket flat only.  If
    your technique is right, you'll make good briskets out of what you can find.
    Keep pushing your store or butcher to bring in what you like if you don't live
    in an area like TX where you can buy brisket at the gas station :).

     

     

    The fire: After totally cleaning out the egg, I add
    the lump. I use only the largest chunks of lump in the bag and I place them in
    by hand to ensure max airflow. If it's smaller than a deck of cards,
    I don't put it in my low and slow fires. I do not dump the lump in
    from the bag so I don't get any small pieces or dust
    clogging up the airflow. I put the lump to the top of the fire box (to the line
    between the fire box and ring) and light it. I let it burn for 30 minutes or so
    until all the lump is glowing and starting to
    turn white (it's really hot by this time). I then add 3-4 fist size pieces of
    of whatever wood you like to use (I'm partial to Pecan, Oak, Mesquite, or
    Hickory but this is all personal preference and it's OK to use whatever you
    like). I then put the plate setter on and then choke the fire down to 225-250
    dome temp. I prep the meat while the fire is coming back down to temp. it does
    not take too long and I find this process makes fires that never go out or lose
    temp in the night.

     

    The Prep: As the fire comes to
    temp, I prep the meat. Here is the way I do it:  I place the brisket fat side up on the counter and I
    trim the "hard" fat off. All untrimmed briskets have some very thick
    fat that is actually hard to the touch. This fat will not render any moisture
    or become soft during the cook so I get rid of it. If any fat is thicker than
    1/4 inch or so, I trim it down a bit (I'll explain why in the cutting section).
    I then use my favorite dry rub of the week to cover the entire brisket. Right
    now it's Dizzy Dust but I like lots of them. Some guys like making their own
    and I'm all for it if that's your deal. Send me the recipe if you make a good
    one. I put the rub on to where you can no longer see the grain of the meat at
    all. I do not use any binders (oil. mustard etc) for the rub. The moisture in
    the meat is plenty to hold the rub on. Oil is bad because it stays moist during
    the cook and you’ll never get a good bark with is you use oil as a binder.
    Mustard is fine if you are bent on using a binder, but you don’t need it.  I let it sit for an hour or so at room temp
    while the egg is stabilizing. The rub will actually turn into sort of a paste
    during this time and that's OK. it will firm up during the cook. If
    any of it melts off or looks a little thin, I add a little more rub
    right before the cook. 

     

     

    The Setup: Once the meat is
    prepped and the fire is stabilized at 225-250, you are ready to get your setup
    together and on the pit. For my setup, I use a jalapeno roasting rack (it’s the thing shaped like TX in
    the pics below) to raise my foil drip pan off the plate setter. Anything that
    will give you an inch or more of clearance from the plate setter that allows
    airflow between the drip pan and plate setter will work. (I even used rolled up
    "rods" of tin foil before I figured out
    my little jalapeno rack setup and the brisket didn't even notice :).
    I've found the 13"x9" pans work perfectly (V-Rack fits perfectly
    inside) for this set up.  I then put some water into the pan and place my
    brisket or butts on a V-Rack into the pan. Be careful that your meat does not
    come in contact with the water in the pan. I put my brisket fat side up, but
    this is really just a leftover habit from my pre-egg days. I can't tell you
    this makes any difference but it's the way I do it. One more note about
    adding water: butts and briskets release a ton of moisture during the cook so
    if you add too much of water before they have released their moisture and then
    go to bed, you might over flow the pan or raise the level to where it touches
    the meat (no bueno).

     

    The Cook: Once the egg is dialed in at 225-250, and
    you get your setup ready, it’s time to throw on the brisket. I usually put
    briskets and butts on around 9-10PM. This gives me a few hours to make sure
    everything is locked in and the fire is exactly the way I want before going to
    bed. I may add a little more water when I go to bed at 11-12 (or 1 or 2
    depending on the mood of the chef and how many beers are left). Sometimes I
    don't add any more water for the entire cook but I always add it when I throw
    the meat on. I then go to bed and don't check temps or have thermometer alarms
    set or anything like that. If you build the fire right, go to bed and sleep
    tight. The only exception to this rule is weather. I'm talking about big cold
    fronts that come in during the cook or a big rain. I live in TX so I get very
    few of either :). I lived in WI when I bought my egg so I know all about bad weather
    rolling in during a cook. If you know weather is coming, set your remote thermo
    alarm just to be safe.

     

    The Stall/Plateau of the cook:  Here is
    where most low and slow newbies get whacked out with briskets and butts. The
    meat will steadily rise to between 150-170 and then just stall out there for
    hours. This is called the stall or plateau and it is critical to good briskets
    and butts. Tougher cuts like briskets and butts have tons of connective tissue
    in the muscle that actually render out during this process. This is what makes
    these cuts so ethereal when done correctly. If you do not properly
    take these cuts through this process, you are going to
    have disappointing results. Once your meat starts climbing out of the
    stall, you can raise the temp of the egg to 350 or so to get it up to temp
    without hurting the meat if you are running behind. The only caveat here is
    that if you do this too long, you will really char the crust and it can get a
    little acrid. I try not to do it, but I have done it many times with good results.
    I never raise the temp to get it through the stall. Patience is key
    and you can ruin a good cook by forcing it through the stall.

     

     If you built your fire right and put it on
    around 9-10 at night, it’s very likely that your brisket will be in the middle
    of, or close to coming out of the stall/plateau by early to mid-morning.  As it starts to rise out of the plateau, keep
    an eye on your temps every hour or so, It can take another 5-6 hours to get up
    to temp so this is part of a long process. I start checking mine for doneness
    around 180 degrees in the thickest
    part of the flat
    . For your sanity, it’s good to keep in mind that more
    than any other cut, briskets are "done when they are done". There is
    no dependable timetable other than use 1.5 hours per lb. as a guide. Give
    yourself plenty of time on both sides of that if you are planning a meal around
    it. You can tell when they are done when your probe slides through the thickest
    part of The Flat with little resistance. The point will
    be done much sooner than the flat because of the higher fat content in the
    point (fat cooks much faster than muscle). Knowing this, always use
    the flat to test for doneness or you will have tough, dry flats. If you use a
    remote thermometer, make sure it is in the thickest part of the flat. If it’s
    in the point or in the “ribbon” between the point and flat, you’ll pull it
    several hours too early and have tough dry flats. I find they are usually done
    around 185-190 but they are seriously finicky about giving up the ghost so
    check by hand as well to ensure. I’ve had them go up to 200 before being tender
    in the flat so this is where your fell will come into play. The more you do,
    the easier it is. You can also look up the TX Crutch technique which is
    wrapping the meat in foil when it reaches the stall. I've heard this provides
    great results, but I love a crunchy bark on my BBQ and the crutch destroys
    bark. It's another tried and true way to do it, but not the way i do it. I
    would try both and see which you like best.

     

    The Rest: I have begun to rest my briskets more
    these days and I do find them to be more tender and far more juicy than when I
    do not rest. The only thing I don’t love about rested briskets and butts is
    that (like the crutch) it softens the bark too much for my taste. I like a
    thick crunchy bark so I am looking for a balance here between resting and good
    bark. I have even thrown a few back on the pit or in the oven at 350 once
    rested just to firm up the bark a little. It works well, but it's another step
    that's probably a little overkill for most. For the rest, wrap in several
    layers of foil, wrap in towels and put in a cooler for 1 or more hours. I find
    they keep for the better part of a day this way so I always plan to be done
    early if I have an event or meal planned. I had one in a cooler for 12 hours
    this weekend (I over cooked for a party) and it was still 145 degrees when I
    pulled it later that night. The crust was super soft but the flavor and texture
    was awesome.

     

    The Trim: This took me a while to figure out and I
    think it's where a lot of good cooks turn bad. Brisket, more than any other cut
    of BBQ, must be sliced across the grain. If you slice a
    brisket with the grain, it is like eating shoe leather. If you accidentally
    slice some with the grain while learning, just chop it up and make chopped beef
    sandwiches. They will be awesome and nobody will be the wiser. This is where
    you must know the difference between your 2 muscles (point and flat) because
    their grains run different directions. If you just slice right through both
    muscles at the fat end of the brisket, you will have tough, stringy
    bites. 

     

     Here is the way I do it: Place your brisket on
    your cutting surface fat side DOWN (point side UP) with the thickest part (this
    is the point) closest to you.  I then
    remove the point from the flat. When the thick end is facing you, about half
    way down the thickness of the brisket you will find the “ribbon” of fat and and
    tissue that connect the 2 muscles. This fat and connective tissue will have been
    rendered very soft by the cook and it’s easy to find by probing gently with a
    knife until is slides right in. Take a good look at your brisket before rubbing
    and cooking so you'll have a good idea where it is. Take a large knife and
    slide it into this "ribbon". It should slide in with very little
    resistance. Keep working your knife through this ribbon until you have
    separated the 2 muscles. The point usually goes about 1/2 way down the
    thickness and 1/3 or so the length of the flat to give you a rough guide.
    When done, your knife will emerge on the top side of the flat about 1/3 toward
    the far facing end of the brisket. This is tough to explain verbally so I’ll
    get pics posted ASAP. This takes a few times to get it right so don’t sweat it.
    When you are done separating the point, you'll have 2 pieces of meat with bark
    on 3 sides and exposed delicious meat (no bark) on the bottom of the point and
    top of the flat. I then cut the flat in half width-wise, locate the grain and
    then slice against the grain! I cannot stress enough that if you take a perfect brisket and slice it
    with the grain, it will be chewy and stringy. It will ruin your brisket so take
    the time to get this right. I start at the fattest end of the flat and
    make slices about1/4” thick. As the flat really narrows, I take that part and
    chop it up to make sandwiches (this will be the driest part of the meat but
    will still have bark on all 4 sides. makes awesome sandwiches with sauce). The
    point (by far my favorite part of a brisket) has a texture more like pulled
    pork. The grain can vary but it is very tender. I'll slice some and leave some
    larger chunks with lots of bark on them to eat right off the cutting board.
    Now, I mentioned earlier that I trim the fat cap down to about 1/4 inch. If you
    do not do this, the fat side of the flat will have a large bite of fat
    on every slice. This fat will have rendered so soft that you can take
    a knife and just scrape it off right down to the meat (almost gelatin like). Many
    restaurants do this but I do not. You lose half your bark and much of your
    smoke when you have to scrape this fat and I'm all about lots of smoke and good
    bark on my briskets and butts. By trimming them to 1/4 inch, you leave plenty
    of fat to protect the flat during the cook and a delicious, smoky, bark covered
    bite. The thin layer of fat is actually delicious covered in bark,
    but I find it's too fatty and distracts from the meat if you leave the entire
    fat cap without scraping after the cook.

     

    Well, that's it. The
    rest is all about jumping in and planning to screw a few up while you
    learn. Best lesson I ever learned about BBQ is that unless you totally screw it
    up, it's all good with a few beers and some sauce. You'll get the hang of it
    soon enough and be killing it in no time.

     

    Good luck, hope you find
    some useful pointers in here. Like I say, there are a lot of ways to
    do it but this one works well for me. Consistent results, tons of
    smoke and bark which is the way I prefer it.

     

    Now for the sauce
    recipe?...........I have a good one. maybe that's another post.

     

    Questions, comments,
    criticisms all welcome…………..Enjoy

     Pic 1) Inverted Plate Setter with my jalapeno roasting rack as a spacer

    Pic 2) Drip pan with water on top of rack/plate setter

    Pic 3) Butt (or Brisket) on V-Rack sitting in drip pan

    Keeping it Weird in the ATX
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  • MickeyMickey Posts: 18,515
    edited April 2012

    Wow CenTex Smoker.

    Just invite me over please. No way I am going to work that hard (or read all that). Bet the farm it is good. I am just a slacker.

    Salado TX Egg Family: 2 Large and a very well used Mini, added a Mini Max (I'm good for now). 

  • I don't blame you. if I had to read all that to get it right, I wouldn't either. I just ruined enough over the years to figure it all out. It's nice to finally have it written down somewhere though. maybe we can save some folks a little money and frustration.....

    Salado ain't that far.....come on over
    Keeping it Weird in the ATX
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  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 14,298

    +1 to The Cen-Tex Smoker post above. What an excellent write-up!  That about covers all you will ever need to know-I have bookmarked three brisket sites that contain very much the same info-if you ever decide to read even more...

    http://www.amazingribs.com/recipes/beef/texas_brisket.html
    http://www.bubbatim.com/Bubba_s_Brisket.php
    http://playingwithfireandsmoke.blogspot.com/1996/03/brisket.html
    You can overload on brisket info- enjoy the brisket journey:)

    Louisville;  L & S BGEs, PBC, Lang 36; Burnin' wood in the neighbourhood. # 38 for the win.
  • +1 to The Cen-Tex Smoker post above. What an excellent write-up!  That about covers all you will ever need to know-I have bookmarked three brisket sites that contain very much the same info-if you ever decide to read even more...

    http://www.amazingribs.com/recipes/beef/texas_brisket.html
    http://www.bubbatim.com/Bubba_s_Brisket.php
    http://playingwithfireandsmoke.blogspot.com/1996/03/brisket.html
    You can overload on brisket info- enjoy the brisket journey:)

    Amen. Just get out there and find a way that works and learn from every cook.
    Keeping it Weird in the ATX
    2 Large BGE
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    1 Karubecue C60 (aka-"The Dishwasher")
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  • Another note on Turbo Brisket: Kreutz market in Lockhart TX (see food network and all other publications that list them as "the best BBQ on the planet) cooks their briskets in 4 hours. I hate their brisket and don't consider them the best at anything (their sausage is amazing though- gotta give it up on that one) but judging by the 500 people in line when they open I'm guessing it's serviceable :)
    Keeping it Weird in the ATX
    2 Large BGE
    1 MiniMax BGE
    1 Karubecue C60 (aka-"The Dishwasher")
    More accessories than TFJ knows about and one more purchase from mandatory counciling
  • Thanks so much! Been caught up in medical nightmare and just now able to log back in. Going to try this next weekend. Thanks so much!
  • brycosbrycos Posts: 137
    Thanks for this CT!  1 question

    You said during the set up that you get the fire going then put on ps and choke it down to 225.  My question is how high does the dome temp get before you put on ps?
  • TTBannonTTBannon Posts: 14

    Quick question.

    When I cook at 225-250 the smoke only blows for 1 maybe 2 hours then it goes clear. I found that cooking 250-275 the smoke goes full for quite a while.

    I've tried the wood chips and chunks spread out on every layer everywhere method and the visual smoke goes away after that time. Is it bad to smoke at 250-275?

  • brycos said:
    Thanks for this CT!  1 question

    You said during the set up that you get the fire going then put on ps and choke it down to 225.  My question is how high does the dome temp get before you put on ps?
    The dome is open so it does not get that hot. I just like to get a good fire going before shutting down
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  • TTBannon said:

    Quick question.

    When I cook at 225-250 the smoke only blows for 1 maybe 2 hours then it goes clear. I found that cooking 250-275 the smoke goes full for quite a while.

    I've tried the wood chips and chunks spread out on every layer everywhere method and the visual smoke goes away after that time. Is it bad to smoke at 250-275?

    N0. It's perfect. I don't ever go any lower anymore. 300 dome- 260-270 grid is perfect


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  • TTBannonTTBannon Posts: 14
    Awesome. I just cant keep the smoke billowing at 225. 250-275 is good for me.
  • TTBannonTTBannon Posts: 14
    How do i tell the difference between dome and grid?
  • tazcrashtazcrash Posts: 1,852
    Remote thermometer like the maverick will tell you grid temp.

    Bx - > NJ ->TX!!! 
    All to get cheaper brisket! 
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 14,298
    TTBannon said:
    How do i tell the difference between dome and grid?

    You don't need to-Since the dome thermo is the one thermo that comes with all BGE's most people reference it (unless otherwise specified) in cooking recipes.  Now "what good is it"?  It's a reference (as long as it's calibrated) and given you cook to final temperature it lets you know the range you are cooking in and thus an approximation of time for the cook.  And for indirect cooks, ( heat deflector in place) the dome thermo will run about 20-40*f higher than the grate when starting out.  Longer the dome is shut the less the temp difference.  FWIW-
    Louisville;  L & S BGEs, PBC, Lang 36; Burnin' wood in the neighbourhood. # 38 for the win.
  • ncbbqncbbq Posts: 257
    Thanks for the tips Cen-Tex. I finally located and attempted a whole packer last week and it was an epic fail. I wound up with pulled beef which I believe meant I overcooked it. It was edible, but I wanted to end up with nice slices. It fell apart when I tried to slice it. I will have to give it another shot I suppose.
  • thetrimthetrim Posts: 3,597
    @Cen-Tex, thank you for the write up.  Very comprehensive and you make Texas proud.  One question I still have is how do you light your slow and lows?
    =======================================
    XL 6/06, Mini 6/12, L 10/12, Mini #2 12/14 MiniMax 3/16
    Tampa Bay, FL
    EIB 6 Oct 95
  • thetrim said:
    @Cen-Tex, thank you for the write up.  Very comprehensive and you make Texas proud.  One question I still have is how do you light your slow and lows?
    I do it as above but I didn't describe it as well as I should have. I light it on top and let it spread out with the dome open for like 10-15 minutes until its good and hot. Then I add platesetter and choke it down. Seems to work for me but there are a lot of ways to do it. As soon as I started letting it go a little longer and get a little hotter/bigger, my fires stopped dying. I don't use big lump like that anymore either. i switched to Ozark Oak and the pieces are smaller. It's better than what i was using too.

    Hope this helps. have a great weekend all.


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  • thetrim said:
    @Cen-Tex, thank you for the write up.  Very comprehensive and you make Texas proud.  One question I still have is how do you light your slow and lows?
    "you make Texas proud" 

    Then God help Texas :)


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    More accessories than TFJ knows about and one more purchase from mandatory counciling
  • SteveWPBFLSteveWPBFL Posts: 1,316
    Wow, the 'mother of all posts'. And I was going to suggest, to get a little feedback not because I ever tried it, splitting the brisket into a flat section and the point and cooking same time but pulling them when each is done right. Forget it now!   :)>-
  • thetrimthetrim Posts: 3,597
    I spent 17 very productive years in the Great Republic and know that many of her citizens, with similar vices as you, make her proud!  So I kindly genuflect to you and this great advice.  Thanks for breaking it down.  I do a lot of low and slows with great success, but briskets been a challenge on the Egg for me foe a long time.  I appreciate the advice and will change my routine.
    =======================================
    XL 6/06, Mini 6/12, L 10/12, Mini #2 12/14 MiniMax 3/16
    Tampa Bay, FL
    EIB 6 Oct 95
  • thetrim said:
    @Cen-Tex, thank you for the write up.  Very comprehensive and you make Texas proud.  One question I still have is how do you light your slow and lows?
    "you make Texas proud" 

    Then God help Texas :)


    Hello Cen-Tex!  Glad to see you back on the forum.  I was wondering if you got banned or something.  What are you cooking this weekend?  Pork butt over here and going to try out my new CyberQ Wifi that Susan bought me for our anniversary.  (She's a keeper.)  Have a good one.

    -----------
    I feel a whole lot more like I do now than I did when I got here.
  • lakewade said:




    thetrim said:

    @Cen-Tex, thank you for the write up.  Very comprehensive and you make Texas proud.  One question I still have is how do you light your slow and lows?

    "you make Texas proud" 

    Then God help Texas :)



    Hello Cen-Tex!  Glad to see you back on the forum.  I was wondering if you got banned or something.  What are you cooking this weekend?  Pork butt over here and going to try out my new CyberQ Wifi that Susan bought me for our anniversary.  (She's a keeper.)  Have a good one.

    Yes, she is a keeper. You.....not so much. I'm just chillin this weekend so I guess I'm having pulled pork at your house :)
    Keeping it Weird in the ATX
    2 Large BGE
    1 MiniMax BGE
    1 Karubecue C60 (aka-"The Dishwasher")
    More accessories than TFJ knows about and one more purchase from mandatory counciling
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 14,298
    @Cen-Tex-as we used to say "surface, surface, surface"-and part two-better to be lucky than good as you help lakewade eliminate any left-overs. Enjoy the weekend and the bourbon train is departing very soon...Cheers!
    Louisville;  L & S BGEs, PBC, Lang 36; Burnin' wood in the neighbourhood. # 38 for the win.
  • lousubcap said:

    @Cen-Tex-as we used to say "surface, surface, surface"-and part two-better to be lucky than good as you help lakewade eliminate any left-overs. Enjoy the weekend and the bourbon train is departing very soon...Cheers!

    Have one for me cap. Off the bourbon for a few days. Headed to key west Monday so lying low until the trip.

    I just realized that I have not cooked anything on my egg in 5 weeks! I'm gone all next week too. Has to be some kind of record.
    Keeping it Weird in the ATX
    2 Large BGE
    1 MiniMax BGE
    1 Karubecue C60 (aka-"The Dishwasher")
    More accessories than TFJ knows about and one more purchase from mandatory counciling
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