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The steel just ain't doin' it no more. Time for KNIFE SHARPENING.

nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,176
edited August 2012 in EggHead Forum
I love to use a sharp knife (jeeze that sounds creepy).  It's been a while, and I've been putting it off, but the steel just isn't working that well anymore.  And a dull knife is a dangerous knife.

How often do you put a new edge on your knives?  I dull my favorites first, then dull everything before I box 'em up and take 'em in the shop and (sigh) sharpen them all.  I've tried a bunch of knife sharpeners through the years - honing blocks, the Spyderco triangle thing, the Chef's Choice sharpener (knife mangling device).  I use a wet grinder with a jig to rebuild the edge, but it's a chore.


______________________________________________
This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

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Comments

  • misumisu Posts: 213
    I take them to the shop about once a year but I really shouldn't wait that long. Perfect excuse to buy another one while they're out
  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    soft german steel dulls quickly, but sharpens quickly.

    i steel before i put it away. that way it's ready when i grab it.  i sharpen as needed, not really to any schedule. i have a few stones in a drawer in the kitchen and do them that way, a few strokes as req'd.

    like anything, you can go nuts with sharpening and knives. i'm a moderate/centrist w/r/t knives and sharpening.
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,176
    Back in the day when I was paid to cook, part of preparing for dinner service was sharpening a set of knives.  Would have to hit them with a steel now and then.  I've grown lazy since.

    Ceramic edges last, but not for a DIY sharpener.  We have a Wusthof set that sharpens easily - if you have a wet grinder, hardness isn't an issue.  Getting the angle right is the issue.   PITA.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • AleBrewerAleBrewer Posts: 555
    I use a Lansky for small knves that I want really sharp, and a Spyderco for everything else.

    I'd really like to get an EdgePro....just haven't gotten one yet.

    Most of mine do need sharpening now though.....maybe next week....?
  • LitLit Posts: 2,643
    I hone mine pretty much monthly. Couple passes at 1000, couple at 6000, couple at 30,000, couple at 60,000 and then strop them on bovine leather. I will use my hone American 30,000 and 60,000 for touch ups sometimes but rarely since I have a 6', 8', and 10' chef that I love as well as a carbon vegetable cleaver thats also fun to use. I have 5 knives I use regulary and to keep them all so they will shave my arms takes about 30 minutes a month with no maintenace in between.
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 15,936
    most of my knives that i use have 10 degree angles or less, they never see a steel and a 2 or 3 swipe on a diamond stone every so often keeps them sharp. a steel would ruin them
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,176
    I carry a SOG utility knife (fits unobtrusively inside my pocket).  AUS-8 steel.  Edge stays sharp, even though I'm constantly doing stupid things with it, like using it as a screwdriver.  Downside - sharpening also takes forever. 

    Because of that and having a bunch of woodworking tools that constantly need sharpening, I bought a Tormek style wet grinder.  I learned the hard way, destroying at least one knife, the jig is crucial.  Also has a stropping wheel, nice feature.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • tgklemantgkleman Posts: 194
    I take the knife block into the woodshop about once a year, and fire up the Tormek.  Takes a little bit of setup... but you get a very consistent bevel angle (because of the jigs) and an incredibly sharp edge.
  • JWBurnsJWBurns Posts: 334
    I have a pull-thru style sharpener, works perfectly.

    I subscribe to the Gordon Ramsay philosophy, and sharpen after every use. I'm anal like that.
  • travisstricktravisstrick Posts: 4,389
    Here is the definitive answer. (for me anyway)

    Be careful, man! I've got a beverage here.
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,176
    edited August 2012
    Here is the definitive answer. (for me anyway)

    Dat's some serious precision.

    I feel like a cave man with mine.  http://www.grizzly.com/products/10-Wet-Grinder-Kit/T10010
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • AleBrewerAleBrewer Posts: 555
    Here is the definitive answer. (for me anyway)

    That's the one I have been lookin' at for a few years now....I should just go ahead and one....one of these days.
  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    edited August 2012
    JWBurns... Ramsey has a video where he talks about "sharpening" each time you use a knife, but he is using a steel.  hate to say it, but he's talking about steeling it, not sharpening, even though he calls it 'sharpening'.  sharpening is different. 

    a steel doesn't remove material. it just realigns the edge.  a real sharp edge can fold over after use, making it feel dull.  but a steel will return it to a straight edge without actually 'sharpening' it.

    at some point you will need to remove material because the edge is truly dull.  that's what sharpening really is.

    a pull thru sharpener will remove material.  but you shouldn't need to do that with each use.  using a steel will extend the time between sharpenings, because it restores the edge, but doesn't remove material. truly sharpening each time will shorten the life of your knife considerably, and unnecessarily.

    here's gordo mixing words>>  how to STEEL a knife





     
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • jlsmjlsm Posts: 749
    +1 Lit. My husband is a woodworker and is a fanatic about keeping blades sharp. I used to kid him about turning to my Chef Choice (purchased when I was single) until I figured out I was truly hurting his feelings. 
    *******
    Owner of a large and a beloved mini in Philadelphia
  • OutcastOutcast Posts: 112
    I have a belt grinder set up that I use for shaping the blades I make.  I just use a felt belt with some grinding rouge to touch up the edges on my kitchen knives.  On rare occasions I'll pull out the Japanese water-stones and redo the edges completely.  A less expensive lower tech method is to use some some wet/dry sandpaper on a dead flat surface [600 grit works well].  If you have trouble maintaining the angle while you sharpen, the setup Travis linked works well, as well as the spyderco type setup. 
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,176
    I have a belt grinder set up that I use for shaping the blades I make.  I just use a felt belt with some grinding rouge to touch up the edges on my kitchen knives.  On rare occasions I'll pull out the Japanese water-stones and redo the edges completely.  A less expensive lower tech method is to use some some wet/dry sandpaper on a dead flat surface [600 grit works well].  If you have trouble maintaining the angle while you sharpen, the setup Travis linked works well, as well as the spyderco type setup. 
    You make knives?  Sweet! 

    I'll use wet/dry paper on a glass pane to back polish chisels.  The wet grinder works well, it's just a chore to diamond dress the wheel square, secure the blade in the jig, measure the circumference of the wheel, find the right angle (Tormek angle setter) and then water everywhere in my otherwise dry shop (not dry by any means in alcohol...)
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • BaysidebobBaysidebob Posts: 488
    Dexter Russell.  Three ceramic rods.  Cleans up easy with bon ami and a sponge.  No angle holder but after a few hundred uses I don't need one.  Angle is different from cleaver to knives to Japanese knives.  Angle comes natural after awhile.  Very quick and convenient.  Knives, especialy stainless steel knives, dull fast.  I probably sharpen each time I use them because the wife has dulled them miserably since my last use.  I've been using this one for a decade while tossing out all sorts of "diamond" pull through and electric sharpeners.
    002.JPG
    1883 x 1023 - 264K
    My actuary says I'm dead.
  • DaveMDaveM Posts: 87
    Per Travis' recommendation, I just ordered the Edge Pro 3 Kit for $225.  I hate all of you!  Every time I read this forum, it costs me money :-)

    I have been using a stone monthly, or whenever my wife complains about dull knives.  I've found that I cannot keep the angle perfect and sometimes I'm just wasting my effort.  Also, no one else could use the stone or risk doing the knives at different angles.  This looks pretty fool proof.  Can't wait to get everything razor sharp!


    --Dave from Leesburg, VA
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,176
    "Fool proof".  That's direct marketing to me.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • travisstricktravisstrick Posts: 4,389
    @DaveM My true expertise on this world are guns and knives. I'm sure you will be more than happy. 
    Be careful, man! I've got a beverage here.
  • FockerFocker Posts: 1,474
    edited August 2012

    @DaveM, they make Japanese Chosera wet stones to fit the edge pro apex.

    Takes the edge pro apex to another level.

    Brandon
    Quad Cities
    "The most important ingredient in cooking is restraint."--Chris Bianco

  • OutcastOutcast Posts: 112
    I have a belt grinder set up that I use for shaping the blades I make.  I just use a felt belt with some grinding rouge to touch up the edges on my kitchen knives.  On rare occasions I'll pull out the Japanese water-stones and redo the edges completely.  A less expensive lower tech method is to use some some wet/dry sandpaper on a dead flat surface [600 grit works well].  If you have trouble maintaining the angle while you sharpen, the setup Travis linked works well, as well as the spyderco type setup. 
    You make knives?  Sweet! 


    I'll use wet/dry paper on a glass pane to back polish chisels.  The wet grinder works well, it's just a chore to diamond dress the wheel square, secure the blade in the jig, measure the circumference of the wheel, find the right angle (Tormek angle setter) and then water everywhere in my otherwise dry shop (not dry by any means in alcohol...)
    I used to do the same for my chisels  [ Im a wood butcher as well].  I've got the tormek, some slow speed 8" grinders and other set ups as well.  I gave up on the tormek, it just takes much longer than other methods for me.  The leather strop wheel is nice though. 
  • OutcastOutcast Posts: 112
    @DaveM My true expertise on this world are guns and knives. I'm sure you will be more than happy. 
    That makes two of us sir. Bravos for the win.... Wish I knew half as much about cooking a proper brisket.  I'm getting better, its just a matter of practice (I hope).
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,176
    @Outcast - "wood butcher" - that's a good one. 
    :))
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • OutcastOutcast Posts: 112

    @Outcast - "wood butcher" - that's a good one. 
    :))
    Oh yes.  I can throw a $200 piece of cocobolo on the lathe and have the worlds most expensive wood chips in no time flat.

    B-)
  • DaveMDaveM Posts: 87

    @DaveM, they make Japanese Chosera wet stones to fit the edge pro apex.

    Takes the edge pro apex to another level.

    Focker, Where do you get these?  Sounds like a nice addition.  --Dave
    --Dave from Leesburg, VA
  • cortguitarmancortguitarman Posts: 1,985
    I plan on getting a set of Kershaw knives. Lifetime warranty. If/when they get dull, send it back and they'll sharpen it for you or send a new one. I'll get two of my favorites so I have a backup when the other is out. They are great quality knives and their kitchen shears are the best I've used too.
    Mark Annville, PA
  • FockerFocker Posts: 1,474
    edited August 2012

    Dave,

    chefknivestogo.com is one of, if not the best, knife merchant out there.

    Spoke with the owner on a couple of occasions.  Excellent service.

    http://www.chefknivestogo.com/chforedpro.html

    Brandon
    Quad Cities
    "The most important ingredient in cooking is restraint."--Chris Bianco

  • I steel before every use.  Whenever Travis and Focker talk knives I listen. 
    I have been toying with buying this knife: Gelstain Gyuto  818TK 190mm  narrow blade.  Anyone here use/own Gelstain knives? 
    Eggin in SW "Keep it Weird" TX
  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 4,231
    I haven't read anything bad about Glestain. I see that the steel is ACUTO 440. I'd guess that is a proprietary version of the 440 line of stainless. I've had a 440 C knife, and it would take a good edge and hold it pretty well. I'm not sure what other cutting advantages the dimpled blade would have, other than foods not sticking as easily.

    For my purposes, I'd go with something a little longer and wider, like the 210 regular width gyuto. Or at least the regular blade width. I really like being able to scoop up a lot of freshly cut food on the side of the blade, so wider in general is better for me.
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