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Whole Beef Tenderloin

MayberryMayberry Posts: 563
edited August 2012 in EggHead Forum
Im supposed to cook a whole beef tenderloin on the Egg for family this weekend. I've slow cooked a ribeye roast before, but never a tenderloin. Due to the lack of fat on the cut of meat, I want it tender, but not well done or dried out. I also Trex steaks on my spider and cast iron grate very often. Should I sear the whole tenderloin the same way? What are your best methods for cooking a cut of beef like this? I have the unfair judgement of all the inlaws resting on my shoulders...any help is appreciated. Thanks!
Athens, GA

Comments

  • njlnjl Posts: 853
    No reason not to sear it before finishing it at 350-400F.  I'd cook it to no more than 125F IT.  Those who like their meat overdone can always microwave it.  OTOH, you could just slice it up into individual tenderloin steaks and Trex those.  I like to buy whole tenderloins, slice them into steaks, and keep the side chain and end of the tail for steak sandwiches.  You don't have to do much of anything to tenderloin to make it tender...it starts out that way.
  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    you can't dry it out unless you overcook it.  that opens up cooking possibilities.

    it's not a flavorful cut, but tender. i would think herb-encrusted, or even drunk and dirty tenderloin.  google that, you'll find a million drunk-n-dirty variations
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • I would trim it and cut it down to similar sized pieces and grill accordingly. Lots of sinew and fat hidden in some areas too. 
  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    LS. i was assuming he'd strip the chain off and chop the tail end for tips or something.  i always do that for whatever kids are eating with us.  makes the tenderloin more uniform.  about 3-4 pounds

    notice i didn't suggest a wellington or mini-(individual) wellingtons. aren't you proud of me?:))
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • I just saw the whole beef tenderloin bit. I did like the herb encrusted drunk thing though. Thought you might have been talking about me
  • Go to the bookstore and pull the Serious Barbecue Book by Adam Perry Lang.  Flip to the recipe for Whole Beef Tenderloin.  Write it down or take some notes.  No need to search for anything else.  Just kidding on that last note.  The recipe itself will call for a paste to be made to put on the outside (mostly beef better than bullion), a rub to be applied, baste with a sauce (worcestershire sauce and brown sugar), and a apple/water spray during the cook. 

    I have made this recipe several times and the crowd has not been dissapointed.  Also, from the above you can see that this recipe has several steps that you may think are a bit much.  Don't be intimidated, they are all easy to deal with and the results are worth it....provided you take on Stike's sage advice on not overcooking it.  If you do go with this recipe be sure to cook to temp as the recipes prescribed times will vary depending on your grill (there are certain parts where the lid is closed...so be careful).

  • GriffinGriffin Posts: 7,449
    notice i didn't suggest a wellington or mini-(individual) wellingtons. aren't you proud of me?:))
    No. I totally think you should have suggested it. With little pieces of dough into the shapes of leaves and berries. That was one mighty fine looking wellington that you did.

    Richardson, Texas

    Griffin's Grub or you can find me on Facebook

    The Supreme Potentate, Sovereign Commander and Sultan of Wings

     

  • Not to mention the candelabras
  • njlnjl Posts: 853
    LS. i was assuming he'd strip the chain off and chop the tail end for tips or something.  i always do that for whatever kids are eating with us.  makes the tenderloin more uniform.  about 3-4 pounds

    Other option is to strip off the side chain, remove as much silver skin as possible, and fold and tie up the tail to make the tenderloin into a uniform thickness roast. 
  • BRush00BRush00 Posts: 365
    I did something similar a few days ago actually (didn't get pics, so I didn't bother with a thread)...

    I bought a whole tenderloin at Costco awhile back, and when butchering it, got a nice sized roast out of the "head".

    I seasoned it with *tries to remember*  salt, pepper, cumin, paprika, chili powder, "something-or-other" chili spice (can't remember the name, I'm thinking adobo but know that's not right...), and some garlic powder.  Basically a homemade smoky/spicy rub...

    I then seared the outsides (rolled it along on my grid extender - down in the fire ring), maybe 60 seconds a side.  Pulled the roast out, added in my platesetter and regular grate, then finished it at around 300 until the internal was 118.

    Really did come out beautifully.  My wife looked at me mid-meal and said something to the effect of, "If this was an $80 meal at a nice restaurant, I would be very happy.  I love the Egg."

    Pretty sure she meant, "I love YOU", but she just got confused, I'll let it slide this time.
    [Insert clever signature line here]
  • EgtsEgts Posts: 27
    If you really want to impress, get your egg stable at 250 or so add smoking smoking wood of your choice. Pull the tenderloin directly out of the fridge, season with seasoning salt and pepper and put in egg. Smoke until temp gets to 110-115, then pull it off the grill. The colder meat is, the more smoke it will take as it warms up. Learned ths from Chris Marcs, of the Three Little Pigs BBQ Team. Crank the heat up to 600-700 degrees, put the tenderloin back on the egg and put some nice gril marks on it. Friends and family seem to go nuts over this.
  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    lo and slo roasts are the way to go.  +1

    re " The colder meat is, the more smoke it will take as it warms up.".  the smoke ring will be helped by the cold meat, but that smoke will stick wherever, whenever you add it.  big fan of smoke here.

    smoke smoke smoke.  and even some for the meat, too!
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • stike said:

    lo and slo roasts are the way to go.  +1

    re " The colder meat is, the more smoke it will take as it warms up.".  the smoke ring will be helped by the cold meat, but that smoke will stick wherever, whenever you add it.  big fan of smoke here.

    smoke smoke smoke.  and even some for the meat, too!

    Dude, you are on a tear today. I might have to get a "centex likey the Stikey" shirt made up......wait, that's weird.....can I delete this .......C'mon this cant be permanent......might have to close my account.....
    Keeping it Weird in the ATX
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 10,071
    @ Cen-Tex-you may have had a few too many shots of the stike Kool-Aid today.  You are approaching the stike vortex-once captured no amount of dry aging will set you free :)>-
    Louisville;  L & S BGEs 
    Pit Barrel Cooker
    ABC- 
  • MayberryMayberry Posts: 563
    Thanks for all the help. I did a trial run tonight with about a 2lb section of tenderloin. I crusted with parsley, sage, rosemary, thyme, garlic, EVOO, sea salt and black pepper. I started to cook indirect, but changed my mind about 15 minutes in. I took out the plate setter and cooked regular grid direct while my cast iron grate was heating on the spider below. I cooked up top until the end, cranked up the heat and finished with the sear on the spider/cast iron. I cooked a little too long for my taste,but the flavor was great and it was really tender. I think I'm ready for the family meal.
    Athens, GA
  • MayberryMayberry Posts: 563
    And really...thanks to all of you. I've been on here for a few months, and I've loved my journey learning the Egg from everyone here. Everyone is always willing to help with solid advice and I am really enjoying learning from all of you. You guys are great. :x
    Athens, GA
  • mokadirmokadir Posts: 114
    I did a couple last weekend for a party,  12 lbs worth, covered with garlic salt, sea salt and black pepper.  Seared it first, then indirect at 325 for about another hour.  Pulled at 120-125 and let sit for another 15.  It was wonderfully med rare.  About 1/4' grey surrounding a perfectly homogenous pink.  Just finished a couple of pounds of leftovers tonight.
    Delaware Valley, PA Large BGE, CGS adjustable rig, iQue110, High-Que grate
  • TjcoleyTjcoley Posts: 3,501
    I've never needed to worry about the tail being well done while the rest of the tenderloin was perfect.  There are a couple of folks in the family who don't like beef done to perfection and prefer 'well done'  A whole tenderloin satisfies all different doneness categories.  Anything from well done to medium rare from one cut of meat is perfect for a large group.  
    __________________________________________
    It's not a science, it's an art. And it's flawed.
    - Camp Hill, PA
  • EllisEllis Posts: 195
    Cen Tex before you close your account post some pics of that T shrit. Another great read. Just lurking again

  • @ Cen-Tex-you may have had a few too many shots of the stike Kool-Aid today.  You are approaching the stike vortex-once captured no amount of dry aging will set you free :)>-
    I found my way out (stopped drinking vodka at the airport)


    Keeping it Weird in the ATX
  • Cen Tex before you close your account post some pics of that T shrit. Another great read. Just lurking again
    I have decided not to close my account. If it's good enough for Beibs, it's good enough for me


    Keeping it Weird in the ATX
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