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Building a table for my XL BGE. Need advice on wood and other input.

YEMTreyYEMTrey Posts: 1,412
edited July 2012 in EGG Table Forum
My father is eager to get together with me and build a table for my egg.  I'm not going to pass up the opportunity.  Gonna be a good experience.

My first question is what type of wood would you recommend?  Something that would be available to me in the midwest, and fairly easy to get would be a plus.  I've read to avoid pressure treated and something else but don't remember.  I'm willing to spend money on nice wood.  Made the investment in the egg, don't want it to sit in a table that doesn't do it justice.

My second question is we'll be using the BGE site/naked whiz template for the build.  Are there any important mod's or things I should change/add to make my table better?

Thanks for any and all input.  Excited to spend some time with dad and build a table together.

-Steve
Cincinnati, Ohio
"Ain't nobody gonna find ya, unless you get yourself lost."

Comments

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,019
    Woods that are naturally rot resistant and available (not rot proof, no such thing) consider:

    swamp cypress (old growth - pretty much only found reclaimed now)
    cedar
    redwood

    Woods people typically make eggs from that are fine if you keep them sealed:
    new cypress
    fir
    #1 white pine

    Ultimate woods for people with lots of money (very rot resistant)
    teak (#1)
    ipe
    cambara
    eucalpytus
    white oak

    If I were on a budget and wanted a pretty table, I'd buy #1 fir, give it a dark stain and follow up with a marine spar varnish. Make sure you minimize areas that water can pool (and start rot).  Most importantly, buy or make a cover.

    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • WolfpackWolfpack Posts: 928
    I think IPE is about the best- very hard and dense wood that is flame resistant and extremely heavy.

    Hard to work with and expensive but will age well and will be the last one you have to make.

    On my to do list to build one out of IPE- will test my meager woodworking skills.

    Let us know what you decide.
    Greensboro, NC
  • XLBalcoXLBalco Posts: 555
    some clear cedar would make a nice table.  i am in the process of staining my table and should of went with clear.. but i still like it:)
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,019
    The stain really helps preserve the wood from UV radiation.  Clear is asking for trouble.  That said, I only use clear.  ( I know, I'm a hypocrite )  I make lots of stuff for the house with old cypress and heart pine, and it's already kinda dark from age, and I like to see the natural wood colors.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • XLBalcoXLBalco Posts: 555

    i guess it depends on how much you will actually leave it exposed.  i plan on keeping it covered most of the time.

    maintenance free is the way to go imo.. maybe one day i will do brick and mortar.

  • FanOfFanboysFanOfFanboys Posts: 1,593
    Subscribing to this thread. I hope to build a table next spring.
    Boom
  • AviatorAviator Posts: 1,431

    Have a question.

    Have gone to every possible place to look for lmber.

    Western red cedar is available at one lumber yard and quite inexpensive. Has more knots on it than I like.

    Redwood can be ordered at another yard, but I have never layed eyes or touched redwood. Lot more expensive, although cost is not the issue here.

    Top will be granite.

    Which one (wood) should I go with?

    ______________________________________________ 

    Large and Small BGE, and a baby black Kub.

    And all the toys to make me look like a Gizmo Chef.

    >:)

    Chattanooga, TN.

     

  • AviatorAviator Posts: 1,431

    Found this on the question I posted above. I am not a specialist, but what say you?

     

    Western Red Cedar and California
    Redwood are from the same genus and have many similarities. The main difference
    is that Western Red Cedar has much greater structural integrity for two basic
    reasons.


    First, Western Red Cedar has far greater flexural toughness
    (able to flex without shattering) than California Redwood. For example, hydro
    electricity poles are made of Western Red Cedar not California Redwood because
    vibrations may cause California Redwood to crack.


    Second, California Redwood has a higher density than Western
    Red Cedar and contains more oils. The effect of this is that California Redwood
    is more difficult to glue, does not retain stain very well, and is easier to
    split when screws are used to fasten pieces together.


    Below is a summary of the benefits of Western Red Cedar:


    Density


    Western Red Cedar's low density enhances its insulation value
    and makes it an easy wood to transport and handle.


    Dimensional Stability


    Western Red Cedar is hygroscopic and will absorb or discharge
    moisture to attain equilibrium with the surrounding atmosphere. It has a very
    low shrinkage factor and is superior to all other coniferous woods in its
    resistance to warping, twisting, and checking. Western Red Cedar's dimensional
    stability makes it perfectly suited to a variety of uses in high moisture areas.


    Thermal Conductivity


    Western Red Cedar is the best thermal insulator among the
    commonly available softwood species.


    Acoustical Properties


    An important acoustical property of wood is its ability to
    damp vibrations. Western Red Cedar is particularly effective in this regard and
    can be used to reduce noise or to confine it to certain areas.


    Durability


    Western Red Cedar contains natural oils that act as
    preservatives to help the wood resist insect attack and decay. Properly finished
    and maintained, Western Red Cedar will deliver decades of trouble-free service.


    Overall


    Western Red Cedar is light-weight, easy to work, easy to
    finish, possessing outstanding dimensional stability, Western Red Cedar is a
    preferred wood for nearly all purposes where attractive appearance or resistance
    to weather is important.

    ______________________________________________ 

    Large and Small BGE, and a baby black Kub.

    And all the toys to make me look like a Gizmo Chef.

    >:)

    Chattanooga, TN.

     

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,019
    The knots add character.  I think redwood is a prettier wood.  Yeah, it does split - you just pre-drill your screws.  Strength shouldn't be an issue with this table.

    I'd get whichever you think looks better.  You're going to drop some money on the top, don't skimp on the base.

    Either way, try to pick your own lumber - and try to get all heartwood (darker).  The sapwood isn't nearly as weather resistant. 

    Redwood turns a dark red, unfinished, with age. Western red cedar unfinished turns a dark grey.  The redwood will probably last longer - has more oils.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • Jmille15Jmille15 Posts: 8

    I used the Naked Whiz template for my LBGE and built it out of IPE. It is some killer hard wood. I snapped several stainless steel screws until I learned to drill larger pilot holes and use a wax ring to lube the screws. The wood is not cheap (~$2.50 linear foot), but is will last a lifetime. I used all stainless fasteners and finished by rubbing mineral oil on it. It tunred out better than I had hoped and definitely is worth the extra investment IMO. image

     

  • Jmille15Jmille15 Posts: 8
    The pic didn't make it... here it is.image
    BGE.jpg
    640 x 478 - 137K
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,019
    Nice table! 

    I hear people recommend adding bees wax to the mineral oil (microwave to dissolve) and it gives you a longer period of water resistance.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • tgklemantgkleman Posts: 194
    Be careful with ipe.  It is almost impossible to glue, even with epoxy.  Be prepared to use mechanical fasteners on all of the joints.  My other hobby is woodworking, and I have heard horror stories about outdoor furniture made of ipe where the glue joints failed.  If you are going to be screwing everything together, than you should be alright.
  • AviatorAviator Posts: 1,431
    IPE like Cumaru is very hard wood and impossible to work on using hand tools. Its like working on concrete.

    ______________________________________________ 

    Large and Small BGE, and a baby black Kub.

    And all the toys to make me look like a Gizmo Chef.

    >:)

    Chattanooga, TN.

     

  • ive got my heart set on using cedar

     

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,019
    I wouldn't say IPE is "impossible" to work with hand tools, but "unpleasant" comes to mind.  My band saw and table saw don't care what kind of wood it is.

    Yeah, you don't want to rely on glue joints alone.  Use mechanical fasteners, mortise and tenons, floating mortises, etc.  Where you do glue, wipe the joint down with mineral spirits - there are some chemicals that rise to the surface (lapacho and oils) that can make the glue joint fail.

    Pocket screws are one of my favorites.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • cortguitarmancortguitarman Posts: 1,970
    Have you considered pvc deck boards? They ain't rot, twist, warp, or get eaten by insects. They will hold up fine with the heat and the material is extremely scratch resistant. Use a pressure treated frame and it will last forever with no maintenance. My bottom shelf of my table is made of pvc decking. My top is concrete. If I wouldn't have used concrete, I wouldn't have hesitated to use pvc decking. Azek is my pvc of choice. Although Wolf is a new kid on the block and making some beautiful material.

    If this doesn't appeal to you, ipe is a great choice, but don't forget about good old white oak. They made ships out of it until the late 1800's. Some are still floating. I'd say it is pretty rot resistant.
    Mark Annville, PA
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,019
    Oak is a great wood.  Hardwoods don't expand/contract as much as softwoods. That makes finishes last longer, and the piece is less likely to self-destruct if it isn't designed with expansion joints.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • AviatorAviator Posts: 1,431

    According to my reseach recently (and I am no expert), oak is not a good hard wood for exterior applications. It can be done, but not the wood of choice.

    It seems the composite or fake deck boards have poor fire resistence. Dont know about vinyl but one would imagine it may not suitable in applications were the cult of "Trex" is regularly practiced.

    ______________________________________________ 

    Large and Small BGE, and a baby black Kub.

    And all the toys to make me look like a Gizmo Chef.

    >:)

    Chattanooga, TN.

     

  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    Any wood has poor fire resistance. Proper airspace is req'd no matter what wood you choose

    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • cortguitarmancortguitarman Posts: 1,970
    White oak is good for outdoors, not red oak.

    The pvc deck boards and composites will work fine for an egg table. The fire is inside of the egg, not on the outside. As stoke said, you need air space around the egg. A 3/4 to 1 inch space will suffice. You still need a paver stone under the egg.
    Mark Annville, PA
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,019

    According to my reseach recently (and I am no expert), oak is not a good hard wood for exterior applications. It can be done, but not the wood of choice.

    It seems the composite or fake deck boards have poor fire resistence. Dont know about vinyl but one would imagine it may not suitable in applications were the cult of "Trex" is regularly practiced.

    Red oak isn't, but white oak is used for external applications.  You can use any wood you want if you finish it correctly.  If you don't want to finish or keep it covered and let it bake in the sun and soak in the rain, I'd build it out of redwood or old-growth cypress.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,019
    ...or teak.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • Jai-BoJai-Bo Posts: 334
    I looked at plans and modified here and there.  I built mine out of cedar...check my thread, it was an awesome experience and being hands on makes it more meaningful!!!!


    Hunting-Fishing-Cookin' on my EGG! Nothing else compares!
  • AviatorAviator Posts: 1,431
    So cool. Yhanks for sharing. The red cedar does look great.

    ______________________________________________ 

    Large and Small BGE, and a baby black Kub.

    And all the toys to make me look like a Gizmo Chef.

    >:)

    Chattanooga, TN.

     

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,019
    I looked at plans and modified here and there.  I built mine out of cedar...check my thread, it was an awesome experience and being hands on makes it more meaningful!!!!


    I wish I could mill my own....something about that level of DIY.  I have a pretty big band saw, been thinking about sawing some logs....
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • bigguy136bigguy136 Posts: 833
    Have you thought about a steel frame wrapped in wood?

    Big Lake, Minnesota

    Large BGE, Stokers, Adjustable Rig

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