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Travis Brisket method

MDHogMDHog Posts: 38
edited July 2012 in EggHead Forum
I'm thinking of trying this this weekend for my first brisket attempt--seems like there is consensus that this is an easier way to go, especially if you only have access to flats.

I'm guessing you don't apply rub to the down side that sits in the liquid, since it would just wash off in the liquid? Also it sounds like fat side up is the preferred way?

Thanks!


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Comments

  • Well, here's the.....rub. Travis can chime in if he is around but here's my thought. If you do fat side UP and only rub that, you are missing out on the best part of the brisket. I would do it fat side DOWN, rub the non fat side and let the fat sit in the braise. It's all going to fall off on which ever side you put in the braising liquid so I would do fat side down and rub the top so you have a good bark on the meat side.



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  • MDHogMDHog Posts: 38
    Thanks Cen Tex. That was one reason I asked the question. Putting the rub only on the fat side didn't seem to make much sense, but neither did rubbing the side that sits in the braising liquid.


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  • No worries. I've seen another method that was half smoked and half braised for competition. they always did fat side up in the smoker and then put it fat side down in the braising liquid after 4 hours or something like that. That makes the most sense to me but I've never done it. I know I would want the crust on my meat and not my fat if I had to choose.



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  • MemphisBBQMemphisBBQ Posts: 92
    I have done almost a dozen briskets since I started smokin' about 6 years ago. The first one I did turned out fantastic, perfectly tender, tasty...man, everything was just ON with it. Ever since then, I have not been able to dial in a technique that I can go to each and every time to deliver the goods on a reliable basis. 
    I don't know if it is like chasing that first high and I will never obtain that again or what. 

    I really need a method that I can rely on.


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  • I have done almost a dozen briskets since I started smokin' about 6 years ago. The first one I did turned out fantastic, perfectly tender, tasty...man, everything was just ON with it. Ever since then, I have not been able to dial in a technique that I can go to each and every time to deliver the goods on a reliable basis. 
    I don't know if it is like chasing that first high and I will never obtain that again or what. 

    I really need a method that I can rely on.


    Very common. Trav's is the easiest because it's essentially a braise. Very tender and very hard to screw up. I'm more traditional with just smoke and rub. I'll be glad to share how I do it and i think I can get you there if you want to explore it the old school way. Might take a few times, but that's half the fun





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  • ajridge35ajridge35 Posts: 52
    Where can I find the how to on Travis' method?
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  • tactical_66tactical_66 Posts: 195
    @ ajridge35 I am a Skins fan as well.
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  • DuganboyDuganboy Posts: 1,118
    I did one using Trav's method and I did it fat side down, so I would have the bark on the top.  Folks at my office said it was really good--best ever.

    Two weeks later I did traditional way and they said it was the best ever.
    :D

    They just want me to keep bringing things in for them to eat.
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  • travisstricktravisstrick Posts: 4,672
    Fat up or down, doesn't matter much. do it in the liquid the whole time or just for a few hours, doesn't matter. It's pretty forgiving. Do raise ur pan above the plate setter or ur liquid will dry up.
    Be careful, man! I've got a beverage here.
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  • BYS1981BYS1981 Posts: 1,737
    @ ajridge35 I am a Skins fan as well.
    I am sorry for you loss.
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  • EllerEller Posts: 56
    Travis, I wil try your method this weekend. Thanks,
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  • MDHogMDHog Posts: 38
    Fat up or down, doesn't matter much. do it in the liquid the whole time or just for a few hours, doesn't matter. It's pretty forgiving. Do raise ur pan above the plate setter or ur liquid will dry up.
    So when you say above your plate setter I assume you mean

    plate setter with legs up
    grid on platesetter
    pan on grid

    Planning to try it this weekend!


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  • GA_DawgsGA_Dawgs Posts: 273

    @ Cen-Tex: What is your method? 

    I have done a full packer only and had pretty good results doing smoke and rub only.   However the only place where I live to find full briskets are local butchers who all only sell Prime grass fed for about $6-7 per lb and a $75 brisket is not going to be an every month .  I got one last week at Sams' Club that is a flat with just a touch of the point not cut off.  All they have are flats, but the price is much better at about $3-3.50 per lb.

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  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 5,678
    @ GA_Dawgs-about all I can get are flats and hitting a home-run with them is a real challenge due to the absense of the moisture from the point.  I have always cooked them at around 260+/- on the dome and see aound 2 hrs/# to the finish-line. I do layer some bacon on the non-fat side of the flat (cook fat side down) just as I put it on the BGE.  Seems to help-the bacon will be ultra crispy well before the flat is finished so I remove it to let the bark finish up.  (use the bacon as you wish...) I intend to give Travis's braise method a shot one of these days. Good luck and enjoy the journey.
    Louisville
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  • travisstricktravisstrick Posts: 4,672
    I've done it several ways. As long as there is space between your indirect piece and the alum pan, ur fine. The way you described is what I normaly do.
    Be careful, man! I've got a beverage here.
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  • GA and Cap- I'm going to do a flat this weekend just to see how different they really are for me. I haven't done a flat in 5 years. I have noticed that going 250-260 grid for about 1-1.25hr per lb is working really well for me. I think it dries out when it goes 2 hrs per lb. i did it that way for may years and I'm getting the best results I've ever had a little hotter and a little faster

    GA- I'll get with you on setup etc later this afternoon. Gotta pay some bills today :)



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  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 5,678
    @ Cen-Tex-I will be paying attention-anything to up the percentage of triples and home-runs.  Good luck with that hunk of beef.
    Louisville
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  • GA_DawgsGA_Dawgs Posts: 273
    edited July 2012
    Thanks Lou, sounds like a good idea...hopefully the brisket turns out well and if not at least I will have some nice crispy bacon!
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  • travisstricktravisstrick Posts: 4,672
    I'll second cen tex observations on hotter and faster being better.
    Be careful, man! I've got a beverage here.
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  • bookswbooksw Posts: 221
    I accidentally did hotter and faster and now my brisket is at temp since 6 AM and dinner is at 7 PM.  Brisket is wrapped in the cooler and Egg is at 230.  I am not sure what I should do.  I am thinking about keeping it wrapped a putting it back on around 1-4PM to heat it back up?
    Charleston, SC
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  • jlsmjlsm Posts: 826
    What exactly is Allegro? Is there an equivalent? Can't find it in Philly.
    *******
    Owner of a large and a beloved mini in Philadelphia
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  • travisstricktravisstrick Posts: 4,672
    I accidentally did hotter and faster and now my brisket is at temp since 6 AM and dinner is at 7 PM.  Brisket is wrapped in the cooler and Egg is at 230.  I am not sure what I should do.  I am thinking about keeping it wrapped a putting it back on around 1-4PM to heat it back up?
    That's what I'd do.
    Be careful, man! I've got a beverage here.
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  • travisstricktravisstrick Posts: 4,672
    What exactly is Allegro? Is there an equivalent? Can't find it in Philly.
    Allegro is a marinade. The top ingredients are: soy sauce, corn syrup, lime juice, onion, and spice. 
    Be careful, man! I've got a beverage here.
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  • jlsmjlsm Posts: 826
    Thanks, Travis. Is it hot spicy like a Vietnamese dipping sauce? 
    *******
    Owner of a large and a beloved mini in Philadelphia
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