Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
It feels as though we’ve waited forever for college football to start, and finally the wait is over! Check out our tailgating page for recipes that are sure to become fan favorites. As an added bonus, the day before Labor Day is National Bacon Day and we don’t know about you, but we like putting bacon on anything and everything, so we’ll definitely be celebrating that. It's time to think about getting out to one of the many #EGGfests around the country - see a list here

I made a concrete countertop for my egg table.

RandallBRandallB Posts: 67
edited July 2012 in EGG Table Forum

Here is the finished product.   I learned a lot and am planning on doing another one to improve on things.  It isn't perfect, but is a tough, weatherproof, countertop for my table.

It was fun learning the concrete mold and pouring process.   I would recommend anyone trying it.    Not including the mold materials and misc, the actual concrete here is only about $7.50 (about 1 and 3/4 80# bags).   A quote for granite top was $400 with the 21'' cutout hole, so doing concrete is an attractive alternative.  For an outdoor countertop, I think it is a good choice.

 

«1

Comments

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,024
    Awesome!  bought a book on concrete counter tops....and I have a cement mixer.  Just need to pull the trigger.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • GolfanaticGolfanatic Posts: 33
    How do you fasten it to the wood?  I am a novice.
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,024
    Silicone caulk
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • RandallBRandallB Posts: 67

    The top is HEAVY.  I estimate 130#s.     No need for concrete mixer unless you are doing very large or multiple pieces.  Mixing one 80# bag at a time (about 1 gallon water added) in a wheelbarrow works well and is pretty stress free and no mess.

    I am working on another material to use for the 21'' hole plug in the mold.  Thinking foam maybe next time. 

    I learned a lot and know what to do better next time.  I want to start on version 2 of the top soon.

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,024
    You put some kind of structural metal in it like rebar, wire mesh, etc. I hope....
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • RandallBRandallB Posts: 67

    I don't know the exact name but I used this ~ 2''x3'' square metal fencing.   I did NOT support enough for the narrow necks around the hole and they cracked.   It needs some long lengths of rebar in those.

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,024
    From my understanding, cracking is normal.  The rebar/mesh gives the top the strength.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • EggucatedEggucated Posts: 212
    You can also place spacers in at the thin part (around the egg) giving you two tops from one form.  Once you take it out of the form you can put a small piece of stainless steel in the joint to set it off.  Was going to attach a picture, but Photobucket appears to be having issues.  I'll see if I can post one later.
    Thanks, Mike "Live in such a way that if anyone should speak badly of you, no one will believe it."
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,024
    You can also place spacers in at the thin part (around the egg) giving you two tops from one form.  Once you take it out of the form you can put a small piece of stainless steel in the joint to set it off.  Was going to attach a picture, but Photobucket appears to be having issues.  I'll see if I can post one later.
    If it cracks anywhere, that's where it would be.  Plus, the heat probably doesn't help.  Good idea.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • EggucatedEggucated Posts: 212
    edited July 2012

    Here's what I was talking about...


    image

    Here's mine, counter top for my basement bar..  I guess I need to make a top for my egg table...
    image
    Thanks, Mike "Live in such a way that if anyone should speak badly of you, no one will believe it."
  • TaylorCRTaylorCR Posts: 33


    You put some kind of structural metal in it like rebar, wire mesh, etc. I hope....
    Why would you need any reinforcing - rebar, welded wire mesh, fiber,
    etc?  All that is going to do is drive your costs up & make it
    heavier. 

    Concrete is strong enough to not need any reinforcing
    for this application.  Rebar & wire mesh only help with tensile
    stress (tension) - which your table/ counter top should have very little
    of. You shouldnt come close to stressing it under compression.  Fiber would just make the finish look ugly and not as uniform.

    The weather / sun should have no effect on it either.

    Your best bet from preventing cracks is a control joint.  But even then your span probably doesnt warrant one.  The best place to put a joint would probably be through the cut out hole, both functionally & aesthetically...similar to the picture above. 

    Just my $.02.

    Also have to say your table top turned out awesome, especially for your first go round. 

    Good luck with your next ones.
    I stole two Charolais heifers ...


    Little Rock, Arkansas

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,024


    You put some kind of structural metal in it like rebar, wire mesh, etc. I hope....
    Why would you need any reinforcing - rebar, welded wire mesh, fiber,
    etc?  All that is going to do is drive your costs up & make it
    heavier. 

    Concrete is strong enough to not need any reinforcing
    for this application.  Rebar & wire mesh only help with tensile
    stress (tension) - which your table/ counter top should have very little
    of. You shouldnt come close to stressing it under compression.  Fiber would just make the finish look ugly and not as uniform.

    The weather / sun should have no effect on it either.

    Your best bet from preventing cracks is a control joint.  But even then your span probably doesnt warrant one.  The best place to put a joint would probably be through the cut out hole, both functionally & aesthetically...similar to the picture above. 

    Just my $.02.

    Also have to say your table top turned out awesome, especially for your first go round. 

    Good luck with your next ones.
    If you don't put any rebar or mesh in it, it will break into pieces.  I bought a book on making them and read extensively on the subject as I was planning on constructing some for our kitchen.  Turns out I didn't because the of several reasons.  Anyway, concrete should never, ever be cast without structural reinforcement rebar or mesh unless you're putting in, say, a post for a fence.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • The concrete they are using now has metal or fiber strands in it and is as strong as if it had mesh and rebar.
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,024
    The question isn't: "will this concrete crack?" it's: "when will this concrete crack".  Fiber does make it much stronger, provided you have very little tensile stress (and extremely stable foundation).  When it cracks, you want it to stay together and not completely fail.

    Everyone who manufactures concrete countertops puts mesh in them, and the better ones add rebar, depending on the pour shape.  There's a reason they do that. 


    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • TaylorCRTaylorCR Posts: 33



    If you don't put any rebar or mesh in it, it will break into pieces.  I bought a book on making them and read extensively on the subject as I was planning on constructing some for our kitchen.  Turns out I didn't because the of several reasons.  Anyway, concrete should never, ever be cast without structural reinforcement rebar or mesh unless you're putting in, say, a post for a fence.
    If it is structural concrete then you are absolutely correct on needing reinforcement. But concrete used in non structural, flatwork, sidewalks, driveways, etc applications doesnt need reinforcement.  Reinforcement in these applications is used as a crutch against your substrate or base.  Its often easier to just throw reinforcement in it instead of making your base better. 

    Essentially its overkill. A 4" thick driveway is better suited than a 2 3/4" one with reinforcing. 

    As long as the concrete is cured under desirable conditions, in this application it should never crumble into pieces.  Sure there might be surface cracks, but it shouldnt jeopardize the integrity of it.  You could use a retardant to slow the curing process which would decrease the possibility of cracks. 

    Im not trying to flame, but just wanted to clarify so people dont get scared about needing/ not having reinforcing. 

    To each their own though... it defiantly wont hurt thats for sure. 
    I stole two Charolais heifers ...


    Little Rock, Arkansas

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,024
    Well, for concrete tops, you should use it.  Down here in New Orleans, the city is basically built on sand from the Mississippi, so you use it everywhere.  It's either on the ground or it's structural.  Basically, that means it's all structural.  This is the last place you want a slab house, and one day on our roads show you how everything sinks.

    To do rebar correctly, you need the rebar near the top and the bottom of the slab, so it has to be thick.  Just run down the center doesn't really give you any additional tensile strength.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 26,161
    I have a raised deck on the back of my house, 70' x 13' x 5". It has rebar and fiber. After 3 years exposed to Canadian winters and freeze thaw cycles it doesn't have as much as a hairline crack. I have installed steel mills on foundations that contain zero rebar (not my choice) but they do stand up. I know several guys that have done concrete egg table tops (not in northern climates) with no bar or mesh and they have stood up fine. I wouldn't risk it myself but rebar has it's issues as well (galvanic reaction ?)

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • ChokeOnSmokeChokeOnSmoke Posts: 1,680
    edited July 2012
    I did a concrete countertop last summer.  It's about 3.5' by 7' feet by 2 inches thick. I did it in two pieces because of weight.  I put rebar around the "egg hole" side and no structural support on the other side. I used Quikrete countertop mix.  No cracks anywhere after a year.

    image
    image
    image


    Packerland, Wisconsin

  • cortguitarmancortguitarman Posts: 1,971
    My top actually has a foam core throughout to lighten up. My buddy makes them and my top was an experiment for this technique. It worked great. Possibilities are endless with concrete. My buddy went to a 2 week school for it. He makes entire kitchen counters with them. He also has made molds to do sinks. I love them. I have them on my bar, bathroom vanity and egg table.
    Mark Annville, PA
  • ccpoulin1ccpoulin1 Posts: 386

    Choke,

     

    That really looks nice!  I am getting ready to do an outdoor kitchen myself, but i am unsure how much work i want to do.  Time is always an issue at my home! 

    "You are who you are when nobody is looking"

  • RandallBRandallB Posts: 67

    My narrow "necks" around the hole are down to 3''+ or so.  I think they needed much more support from lengths of rebar.   I did my hole plug from wood and it was too tight in removing and I cracked (completely broke) all 3 narrow sides of the hole.   I am increasing the total  width next time.

    I like the discussion here and awareness of concrete as a option and fun project.   Shapes, colors, customizing are endless with concrete...and I think the total cost is pretty attractive. 

    I cooked on it again last night, and I must say the top on the table is really growing on me.    I am eager to do Version 2 of it.  I think I can greatly improve on things from what I learned on the 1st top.

    I will post pictures as I progress.

  • OMG EggsOMG Eggs Posts: 118


    You put some kind of structural metal in it like rebar, wire mesh, etc. I hope....
    Why would you need any reinforcing - rebar, welded wire mesh, fiber,
    etc?  All that is going to do is drive your costs up & make it
    heavier. 

    Concrete is strong enough to not need any reinforcing
    for this application.  Rebar & wire mesh only help with tensile
    stress (tension) - which your table/ counter top should have very little
    of. You shouldnt come close to stressing it under compression.  Fiber would just make the finish look ugly and not as uniform.

    The weather / sun should have no effect on it either.

    Your best bet from preventing cracks is a control joint.  But even then your span probably doesnt warrant one.  The best place to put a joint would probably be through the cut out hole, both functionally & aesthetically...similar to the picture above. 

    Just my $.02.

    Also have to say your table top turned out awesome, especially for your first go round. 

    Good luck with your next ones.

  • AleBrewerAleBrewer Posts: 555
    For those that have made a wooden table with a concrete top....is there anything between the top and the frame of the table? I didn't know if you need a 3/4" plywood sub on top of the frame, or can you just silicone the concrete top directly to the wood frame?
  • RandallBRandallB Posts: 67

    No silicone, plywood, or anything under mine, just the 2x4 supports.   The top is so heavy, I don't think it needs silicone or liquid nails or anything.   I think it is strong enough to only need a few 2x4 cross beams.

  • EggucatedEggucated Posts: 212
    It probably doesn't need anything, but I still put some silicone between my cabinets and top.  I figure they do it with granite, so I'd do it with the concrete too.  Can't hurt...
    Thanks, Mike "Live in such a way that if anyone should speak badly of you, no one will believe it."
  • AleBrewerAleBrewer Posts: 555
    I plan on using silicone, like you said....can't hurt.
Sign In or Register to comment.