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Prime Rib Roast

LouieLouie Posts: 5
edited May 2012 in Beef

It has been awhile since I cooked a prime rib roast and I want to try it on a slow cook.  I have an 8 lb prime rib and I'm looking for help. Can anyone tell me what temperature and how long it will take.

Thanks

Louie

Comments

  • hogsfanhogsfan Posts: 128
    If it's a good cut, it really doesn't matter what temp you cook it at. If you do it lower (225-250), you'll have an more even color throughout instead of a "target" look to it. If you do it hotter (350), it will cook faster and likely be a little more moist inside with more crust on the outside. 

    If it was me, I would put it on 4 hours before I want to cook it at 225 and bump the temps up if I need to as I get closer to meal time. 

    The BIG thing with prime rib is picking a good one at the store. Pick a bad one and no matter how you cook it, it won't be good. If you pick a good one, it's really hard to mess it up as long as you hit your internal target temp.
  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    No moisture loss with lower temps. No worries there
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • hogsfanhogsfan Posts: 128
    No moisture loss with lower temps. No worries there
    Of course there is. If you cook anything there is going to be moisture loss. Water evaporates.
  • tvest43tvest43 Posts: 20
    I do those things by slicing some garlic cloves really thin and tucking it in between the fat and the meat wherever I can find a place, salt and pepper (kosher salt) the OUTER part of the meat, both the top and the underside where you tie the bones back on, and cook at between 275-300.  Once the internal temp gets to 115-120, pull it off and wrap in heavy duty aluminum foil for at least a half hour.  One more hint - let it sit on a counter for at least an hour before cooking......makes for a much more even "pinkness" after cooking.  This is what I do every Christmas, and have 3 more in the freezer for special occassions......This way with even a subpar piece of meat, it's still really wonderful.
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 4,847
    I'm in the low&slow camp here with great results-250*F+/- on the dome at around 25 mins/# to the finish temp you want.  Fresh ground pepper and salt and away you go.  I use Jack Daniles oak smoke wood if I have it otherwise-straight oak wood.
    Louisville
  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    edited May 2012
    hogsfan....

    the point made was that there would be more water loss at lower temps than higher. this is not correct.  there is no more appreciable water loss by slower roasting than any other conventional method (higher heat, searing/roasting, etc.).  in fact, searing and high heat would cause MORE water loss (check MacGee on the matter).  but even they don't cause enough to be a problem.

    your "of course there is" would apply to simply leaving the thing on the counter.  let's not pick nits

    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • hogsfanhogsfan Posts: 128
    edited May 2012
    Fair enough. 

    My experience is that both are good and I prefer low and slow because I think it makes a better presentation but typically when my prime rib is cooked a little hotter (not seared...I'm only talking like 350), it retains a more moist mouth feel as well as a few other differences. I actually have always attributed this to fat rendering over time in the cooker without melting connective tissue to compensate and not necessarily to water loss (though I recognize I confused the issue when I was the one that brought up water in response to your last post...in my original post, I actually had fat in mind.) 

    My larger point was that any prime rib is going to be great if you hit your target temp and to reassure the OP that it's going to be awesome no matter how he cooks it and to let him know the differences in how the meat comes out...at least the ones that have been on my plate in the past. ;)
  • GHS1282GHS1282 Posts: 2
    If you buy USDA Choice or Prime graded beef then you should be fine.
  • gte1gte1 Posts: 374
    I tried one at lower temp, and it took on way to much smoke flavor for me. Prime is way too flavorful on its own and doesn't need the smoke flavor IMO.

    George
    George
  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 26,159
    Have you tried one without wood? Maybe less.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    low temp doesn't necessarily imply more smoke.

    just leave out the extra wood.


    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • I have done many in the past..I apply my dry rub and then sear mine on both edges to retain the moisture. Then, I will close the vents and drop the temp down to 250 deg. Then cook it at 25 min/lb. It has turned out great. I get a dark brown/black bark on the outside and pretty rare color on the center. I get the internal temp to 125 deg for rare and 145 deg for medium. Wrap in foil just like mentioned and enjoy!
  • gfavorgfavor Posts: 56
    For everyone, Are you doing you cooks direct or indirect. I have a problem knowing to cook indirect.
  • Very general rule-of-thumb:

    direct = I'm using my Egg like a grill
    indirect = I'm turning my Egg into a convection oven

    Thus, for a prime rib roast, I think most folks would tend to cook it indirect, and let it "roast" (except for those who choose to sear it first, in which case they'd sear it direct, then set it up to cook indirect after the sear).

    HTH,
    Rob

    Don't get set into one form, adapt it and build your own, and let it grow, be like water. Empty your mind, be formless, shapeless — like water. Now you put water in a cup, it becomes the cup... Now water can flow or it can crash. Be water, my friend. - Bruce Lee
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 4,847
    edited June 2012

    Going at the 250*F +/- dome, I run indirect-but I guess you could go direct-never thought about that option. Happy with where I am but will give the direct choice a go.  Just try it out and with a good "finish" thermo you can't mess it up beyond getting to the finish-line too early or late.  Regardless, all will taste great!

    Louisville
  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 26,159
    I go with just a drip pan cause I usually make Yorkshire pudding and gravy just to round out a healthy meal

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

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