Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
Welcome to the EGGhead Forum - a great place to visit and packed with tips and EGGspert advice! You can also join the conversation and get more information and amazing kamado recipes by following Big Green Egg at:

Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Instagram  |  Pinterest  |  Youtube  |  Vimeo
Share your photos by tagging us and using the hashtag #EGGhead4Life.


In Atlanta? Come visit Big Green Egg headquarters, including our retail showroom, the History of the EGG Museum and Culinary Center!  3786 DeKalb Technology Parkway, Atlanta, GA 30340.

Seasoning a carbon steel wok / cast iron lodge dutch oven with edible linseed oil (flaxseed)

paqmanpaqman Posts: 2,728
edited June 2012 in EggHead Forum
I subscribe to cooks illustrated and they suggest that using several coats of flaxseed oil to season cast iron cookware is the ultimate way to go.
 
Here's the link (subscription required): http://www.cooksillustrated.com/howto/detail.asp?docid=26897


Has anyone used this method? Would it work on a carbon steel wok?  They recommend 6 coats for cast iron,  how many would be required on a carbon steel wok?

Steps:
1. Warm an unseasoned pan (either new or stripped of seasoning*) for 15 minutes in a 200-degree oven to open its pores.

2. Remove the pan from the oven. Place 1 tablespoon flaxseed oil in the pan and, using tongs, rub the oil into the surface with paper towels. With fresh paper towels, thoroughly wipe out the pan to remove excess oil.

3. Place the oiled pan upside down in a cold oven, then set the oven to its maximum baking temperature. Once the oven reaches its maximum temperature, heat the pan for one hour. Turn off the oven; cool the pan in the oven for at least two hours.

4. Repeat the process five more times, or until the pan develops a dark, semi-matte surface.

*To strip a cast-iron pan of seasoning, spray it with oven cleaner, wait 30 minutes, wash with soapy water, and thoroughly wipe with paper towels.


____________________
Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage. •Niccolo Machiavelli

Comments

  • FockerFocker Posts: 5,709
    edited June 2012

    Yes, season a carbon steel wok as you would a cast iron pan.  Don't think you would need  six coats.  For the two I did, seasoned maybe three times.

    Same for Lodge.   The Lodge pieces I have stripped and reseasoned, I've only had to season two or three times and they start to blacken quickly.  The vintage stuff like Wagner, Griswold, etc requires special care (more seasonings with smaller amounts of oil). 

    Flaxseed is commonly used.  My current oil of choice is Grapeseed.  One tablespoon is plenty, almost too much.  Just enough oil to coat, then wipe off.  Paper towels tend to leave tiny paper particles in the oil as you coat.  I use two older kitchen towels and designate one for the oil, and one to wipe it off.

    The rest of your instructions look good except for oven cleaner stripping.  If only it were that easy?

    You get a gunked up 100 year old pan with carbon and oven cleaner is useless.  I've tried it once. 

    Brandon
    Quad Cities
    "If yer gonna denigrate, familiarity with the subject is helpful."

  • Austin  EggheadAustin Egghead Posts: 3,709
    pagman, pay close attention to what Focker says.  His restorations of CI is a work of art.  
    Large, small and mini SW Austin
  • FockerFocker Posts: 5,709
    Thanks, just trying to pass along what others have been nice enough to teach me.  
    Brandon
    Quad Cities
    "If yer gonna denigrate, familiarity with the subject is helpful."

  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 21,041
    im in the lard camp, why, because it works, because i always have some, and because even when i dont trust its freshnes its still in the fridge waiting to reseason a pan. its more important how to treat a pan after its seasoned, ie. never let it leave the stove top or see a sink, NEVER
  • paqmanpaqman Posts: 2,728
    Thw wok is brand new and was covered with motor/machining oil.  I cleaned it with dish soap and then with 99.9% isopropyl alcohol (I use that to clean sensitive electronic components and specialty lenses), it leaves no residue and removes oily films.  I then followed the instructions posted above.  I could not wait for a reply so I already applied the first coat (really thin coat, I removed as much as I could with a lint free cloth).  It looks great, dark bronze, almost black already.  It is back in the oven for the second coat.

    How does grapeseed oil compares to flaxseed oil?  any advantage?

    ____________________
    Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage. •Niccolo Machiavelli
  • paqmanpaqman Posts: 2,728
    im in the lard camp, why, because it works, because i always have some, and because even when i dont trust its freshnes its still in the fridge waiting to reseason a pan. its more important how to treat a pan after its seasoned, ie. never let it leave the stove top or see a sink, NEVER
    I have no doubt that lard works, it's the traditional way to season cast iron. Did you take a look at Sheryl's blog post?

    Ironically, it’s for exactly these reasons that the best oil for seasoning cast iron is an oil high in omega-3 fatty acids – in particular, alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). Free radicals are actually what enable the polymerization. Drying oils, which produce the hardest polymers, are characterized by high levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids, especially the omega-3 fatty acid ALA.

    The lard that was traditionally used for seasoning 100 years ago was much higher in ALA than fat from pigs today, because back then pigs ate their natural diet. Today they are raised on industrial feedlots and forced to eat grain, making their fat low in omega-3s.

    ____________________
    Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage. •Niccolo Machiavelli
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 21,041
    ive read the stuff before on flax seed, i fry alot of lake trout thats really high in omega 3, maybe it helps, i dont know, lard i always have. linseed is almost like a varnish, it probably works better but i still say its how you treat it after its seasoned, no sink
  • paqmanpaqman Posts: 2,728
    ive read the stuff before on flax seed, i fry alot of lake trout thats really high in omega 3, maybe it helps, i dont know, lard i always have. linseed is almost like a varnish, it probably works better but i still say its how you treat it after its seasoned, no sink
    Cooks illustrated claims that after treating with flaxseed they were able to clean in an industrial diswasher without damaging the seasoning.  I have no intention to use a diswasher but I was looking for feedback from someone having tested this method.

    Focker seems to have experience with flaxseed and grapeseed oil and prefers grapeseed.  I'll wait to see if someone can explain why one is better than the other (or even lard) and I'll decide what to do for my dutch oven. For now, flaxseed looks amazing on the wok.

    ____________________
    Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage. •Niccolo Machiavelli
  • paqmanpaqman Posts: 2,728
    im in the lard camp, why, because it works, because i always have some, and because even when i dont trust its freshnes its still in the fridge waiting to reseason a pan. its more important how to treat a pan after its seasoned, ie. never let it leave the stove top or see a sink, NEVER
    BTW, how often do you have to reseason your pans?

    Please not that I have no experience whatsoever with cast iron...

    ____________________
    Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage. •Niccolo Machiavelli
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 21,041
    ill do it in the winter to take the chill out of the house when i lose a fire in the coal stove, i toss all the pans in the oven. if you dont use every pan regularly you will see one occasionally soften, its not really a reason, its just a rebake
  • FockerFocker Posts: 5,709
    edited June 2012

    paqman, one is not better than the other.  you will get good results with both.  i use what the pros on the griswold forum told me to use.  

    reseasoning depends on how they are used and cleaned. 

    some swear by not using dish soap.  i've used small amounts to clean the pan and it's fine, didn't remove any seasoning.  try to use hot water with a brush until it is well seasoned.   

    using it is the best way to season.  if it starts to look ashy, then i spray with a small amount of canola oil(pam), wipe off, and hang on the rack inbetween uses.  this will inhibit any surface rust formation.

       

     

    Brandon
    Quad Cities
    "If yer gonna denigrate, familiarity with the subject is helpful."

  • paqmanpaqman Posts: 2,728
    Finished seasoning the new carbon steel wok with 4 coats of flaxseed oil.  It has a nice really dark bronze finish, almost black.  First cook will probably be cashew chicken later this week.





    image

    ____________________
    Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage. •Niccolo Machiavelli
  • paqmanpaqman Posts: 2,728
    Thanks @Focker and @Fishlessman,  I appreciate your advices.

    ____________________
    Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage. •Niccolo Machiavelli
  • FockerFocker Posts: 5,709
    Very nice job, it will blacken as you cook with it.
    Brandon
    Quad Cities
    "If yer gonna denigrate, familiarity with the subject is helpful."

  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    don't think that baby can get any blacker!
    looks great
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 21,041
    don't think that baby can get any blacker!
    looks great
    are u sure that black is the key
     i had one that stayed straw colored for years
    :D black doesnt mean much, its that hard shiney sheen that makes a difference
  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    i just said it was already black.
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • paqmanpaqman Posts: 2,728
    It sure looks nice right now,  I will let you know if it works after a few cooks.  I do not mind the color, but I wanted a good quality seasoning.

    ____________________
    Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage. •Niccolo Machiavelli
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 21,041
    It sure looks nice right now,  I will let you know if it works after a few cooks.  I do not mind the color, but I wanted a good quality seasoning.
    that shiney hard look is what you want, it looks great
  • FockerFocker Posts: 5,709
    edited June 2012

    stike, yes they can.

    damn...it feels good to prove you wrong. lol

    (just kiddin')

     

     

    Brandon
    Quad Cities
    "If yer gonna denigrate, familiarity with the subject is helpful."

  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    edited June 2012
    his was just reflecting blue sky out the slider door and the seatback cushion.  but i think you guys are as black as you can get!
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
Sign In or Register to comment.
Click here for Forum Use Guidelines.