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Will this taste good?

mountaindewbassmountaindewbass Posts: 1,731
edited May 2012 in EggHead Forum
So im doing spare ribs tomorrow night amd had a quick question on flavor....

I was thinking of a using mustard as a base.. Then mixing brown sugar and my sweet mesquite rub from costco.. Do you think brown sugar would be good mixed with mesquite? Also using hickory chuncks with apple chips... Thinking 245 indirect heat with rack cut in half in v rack
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Comments

  • daveyray72daveyray72 Posts: 67
    Should have a nice sweet/smoky hot contrast when done.  Using mustard will not impart any flavor on your end result.  Mustard serves as a "glue" for your rub and gives you a nicer, more even and thick rub bark.

    Let us know how they turn out.
    Love smoking chicken...but they are hard to keep lit ;-) http://daveyrayland.wordpress.com/ Small Egg / Weber OTG 22" / CharGriller Trio / Masterbuilt 30" Electric
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  • pezking7ppezking7p Posts: 132
    Mouth is watering already....I should do some spare ribs :P
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  • boatbumboatbum Posts: 1,273
    Sounds good to me.   Note, I normally apply the rub, then put Brown Sugar on in a second application.  Not sure if it makes that much difference.
    Cookin in Texas
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  • GriffinGriffin Posts: 6,776
    Brown sugar might burn or turn your ribs really dark. If anything, I would go with a turbinado instead (like Sugar in the raw) But I maybe wrong.

    Richardson, Texas

    Griffin's Grub or you can find me on Facebook

    The Supreme Potentate, Sovereign Commander and Sultan of Wings

     

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  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    edited May 2012
    all sugar burns at essentially the same temp.  in fact, the claims that Turbinado burns at higher temps are, i think, all apocryphal.  Never found a legit source that claimed it (with evidence, i mean).  Think of it: doesn't everything burn sooner and at lower temps the less refined it is?  and Turbinado is less refined than white table sugar.  In the end though, it's 99.99% sucrose.  if the rate at which it burned exhibited any significant difference than any other sugar, i'm betting you wouldn't be able to tell in a backyard situation.

    many folks find mesquite "too strong" (entirely personal) sometimes.  are they using too much? i dunno.
    i think mesquite tends to be used with beef more than anything.  we don't get it here unless we buy it (and 'frugal' (read: 'cheap') new England yankees have an aversion to buying wood when they are surrounded by trees  :) )

    careful with the mesquite. it's almost universally regarded as 'strong', and it may overpower the pork during such a long cook. i can't say if you'll be one of the people who finds it strong.

    maybe toss a chunk of chicken on there early in the cook, and see for yourself after a few hours.


    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
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  • GriffinGriffin Posts: 6,776

    I knew stike would answer with a more reliable answer sooner or later. Like I said...might. That is what I've always heard (and I know I shouldn't always believe what I hear without looking into it further for myself), but I personally don't really like to add sugar to any of my cooks, so I'm not an expert and what I said should jsut be ignored.

    stike - he was talking about a mesquite rub (which I am not familiar with), not mesquite wood. 

    Richardson, Texas

    Griffin's Grub or you can find me on Facebook

    The Supreme Potentate, Sovereign Commander and Sultan of Wings

     

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  • KingRoverKingRover Posts: 115

    Would the sugar burn at 250?  I use turbinado in my rubs. I noticed my turbo spares had some unpleasant charred-ness, but they were cooked at 350. I've never notice that taste on my low and slow butts - although they look burnt like they went to hell and back.

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  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    sorry about the smoke vs rub issue. i saw mesquite and thought he meant smoke.

    question then is easily answered by mixing a small batch.  not sure what mesquite rub' tastes like myself.  mesquite wood itself isn't eaten...  so it maybe has some mesquit smoke added already

    re: turbiunado and burning.... in my odd little corner of the world, i generally find that the more often i hear something repeated emphatically (in this case, turbinado burns at higher temps than regular sugar), the less likely i am to believe it.  hahaha  i have heard it a million times on the forum, but there's never been anything i could find to confirm it.  their own website makes no such claim, and industry whitepapers don't help. inclined to think it is all backyard B.S.  (like the smoke ring info we hear over and over, for example).

    think of cooking oil though, as an example.  or petroleum based fuels, or alcohol, or anything else organic which provides energy (all these things are fuels).  the less refined, the lower the smoke point. i've been wrong more often than not.  if someone can chase down an actual definitive answer it would be great.  lords knows we've tried :))

    again though. let's say turbinado DOES burn at a higher temp.  we'd be talking a degree or two, not ten or twenty, and such a difference isn't anything you could ever use to your advantage in cooking.

    kingrover.... the blackening isn't necessarily the same as burning, if we are thinking of burning as some quick incinerating process.  sure, the end result is blackened charcoal, but you can get that without 'burning'.  in fact, the charcoal you use in your grill isn't burnt wood, by the general definition.  it never saw flame.  never had contact with open flames or glowing coals.

    it was made by putting it in an airless (relatively) space (a retort) and that retort was surrounded by fuel.  the space in the retort is heated, but since there's no oxygen, that retort and wood inside it never bursts into flame. simply put,  everything that isn't carbon is driven off under the heat and low-ox environment, and the carbon stays behind. it's blak.  and sure looks burnt to me.  but it isn't.

    to a certain extent, that's what happens with sugary coatings in the oxygen-deprived, somewhat high heat environment of an indirect set up.

    granted, if the meat hangs over and gets a direct view of the lump, it happens the way we think of when we say 'burnt'.

    but at the end of the day.  carbon is carbon.  doesn't matter how you get there.

    i save sugary syrup glazes for the end. last hour our so.  they blacken (ok, burn) more quickly it seems.  some of the sugar in a rub will blacken too, but not char in some great adverse amount like it would if you sauced the ribs from the beginning of the cook.. 

    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
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  • mountaindewbassmountaindewbass Posts: 1,731
    Stike

    You should tach bbq classes lol. So to do a 'rub' tesr i should mix the ingredients together and give it a taste? Im afraid of a incohesive mix that leaves the palllet wondering what just touched it.. In a bad way
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  • pezking7ppezking7p Posts: 132
    Everything I've low-n-slowed so far I've done with massive quantities of brown sugar in the rub, usually 50% of the rub or so is brown sugar.  No off or burnt flavors (and the last butt I did went to 300 overnight so it had plenty of chance to burn).  This would be more of a problem if you were doing direct cooking. 

    I still say it's going to taste good :P
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  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    screw what the palate thinks.  what do YOU think?

    it's all experimentation.  don't sweat it.  let's say you mix it up, try some, decide you like it, then use it on the ribs.  and it turns out 'meh'.  it's not a fail.  you will fine tune your ribs as you go.
    i have the same rub ingredients on hand, but never follow a recipe.  just fire things in the bowl and mix it roughly by eye. my wife makes the sauce (w like sauce), and although she has a method, she plays with it too.  invariably you'll hit on a "wow. try THIS" moment.  but even if you replicated that each time, you'd get bored.

    just have fun with it.

    not one person here could say "yes, it will taste good" and guarantee that you'd like it anyway.

    tweev posted drbbq's basic rub, and said the same thing that i think... it's a great rub by itself, and it also supports playing around.  so play with your recipe.

    if you really have concerns, i'd try the rub on somethig first. to me, it's amlost always 'good' on some way.  i gurantee that when you make what you consider your 'worst' ribs, they'll still be better than the ones you sued to make, and any buddy of yours that gets to have them will keep telling you how good thy are.

    hard to screw them up.

    and i shouldn't teach nuthin.  i honestly can't cook for squat unless i follow a known method. and even then o pooch it fairly regularly. go to an eggfest.  you'll see some intimidating cooking

    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
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  • mountaindewbassmountaindewbass Posts: 1,731
    Im hoping for an eggfest soon..? But there arent any in my area....
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  • boatbumboatbum Posts: 1,273
    I use brown sugar alot.   Put it over the rub - benefit I "think" I get is an external binder as it carmelizes to hold more bark on.    Has never tasted burnt.
    Cookin in Texas
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  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    +1, boatbum.
    i wavr between making rubs that are paprika based and brown sugar based.  probably brown sugar more often than not.  never really 'blackens' entirely. 
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
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  • KingRoverKingRover Posts: 115

    good stuff, thanks

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  • DuganboyDuganboy Posts: 1,118

    Taste, fortunately, is very personal.  You may think it tastes great and I hate it.

    Lot of good posts about rubs.  I've bought a bunch of rubs and made a bunch of rubs.

    Find the rub and type of wood that you and the people you cook for like and you will be very successful.

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