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Pizza Sauce discussion

NewEnglandEggerNewEnglandEgger Posts: 104
edited March 2012 in EggHead Forum
I've searched the forum, and have not found any discussion on options for pizza sauce.

Jars or Homemade recipes....

Suggestions?

Tom

Comments

  • ChubbsChubbs Posts: 3,632
    In the past i have used Paul Newmans Sockorooni spaghetti sauce so I can use the rest for spaghetti later in the week. Today, however, I found Enrichos All Natural Pizza Sauce at Fresh Market and it was outstanding. That being said, I use store bought.
    Columbia, SC --- LBGE 2011 -- MINI BGE 2013
  • GrannyX4GrannyX4 Posts: 1,365
    The husband doesn't like red sauce so we use goat cheese - either plain or herb and garlic. I have also used boursin cheese and sundried tomatoes. ;;)
    Every day is a bonus day and every meal is a banquet in Winter Springs, Fl !
  • Mighty_QuinnMighty_Quinn Posts: 1,878
    I purée a can of whole peeled San mazano tomatoes and use that...uncooked until it cooks when the pizza does.
  • BotchBotch Posts: 2,742
    Its all about the tomatoes.
     
    And my world was just rocked a bit recently.
     
    I've been reading www.pizzamaking.com for a few years now, and there's a rather passionate (some would say anal) argument about the best tomatoes to use on pizza.  The general consensus was that geniune italian tomatoes from the San Marzano area, D.O.P. certified, were the absolute best for pizza.  
    Well, Cook's Illustrated did a canned-tomato tasting this month, and kind've turned that conclusion on its head; the italian tomatoes (Red Pack, etc) did very poorly, while Muir Glen Organics, and then Hunt's (!) Plum Tomatoes, came in first and second!
    I've tried Muir Glen before, and I wasn't impressed.  However, I used to make my spaghetti sauce with Hunt's, and I haven't tasted anything better (I can't find Hunt's Plum tomatoes here in Utard!)  
    Guess I'm gonna have to do my own taste test.  
    _____________________________________________
     
    Live fast, die young, and leave a well-marbled corpse.  
     
    Ogden, Utard.  
  • Mighty_QuinnMighty_Quinn Posts: 1,878
    Botch- check this site out if you like pizzamaking.com

    http://www.varasanos.com/PizzaRecipe.htm

    This guy knows his pizza!!!
  • Randy1Randy1 Posts: 357
    edited March 2012

    I make a homemade  red sauce for pizza, it kind of has a sweet element to it.

    I cover the bottom of a large sauce pan with olive oil and saute some fresh minced garlic. Then I add a 28oz can of tomato sauce and a small can of tomato paste. Let it heat up and then put 3Tbs of white sugar, 3 Tbs brown sugar, one tsp oregano, one tsp basil, I have also put 1/2 tsp of italian seasoning in it too( maybe repetitive) 1/2 tsp onion powder and a sprinkle of crushed red pepper flakes(to taste). then I cover the surface of the sauce with salt ( never measured it). Let simmer(covered) 1 hour or as long as you can. This sauce has a unique flavor. When I started cooking pizza on the BGE I developed this sauce and always have used it. I hope this helps. ( The original sauce I made had no oregano and 1/2 teaspoon of italian seasoning) . Not authentic italian, but a good sauce IMHO.

    Randy

    Benton,Arkansas
  • Village IdiotVillage Idiot Posts: 6,947
    When the herb garden is in, I get a can of tomato paste and add chopped basil, oregano, marjoram and thyme.  Then, I add garlic, italian seasoning, and fennel seeds.
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Gateway to the Hill Country

  • EggbertsdadEggbertsdad Posts: 791
    I purée a can of whole peeled San mazano tomatoes and use that...uncooked until it cooks when the pizza does.
    Something along this line. I like to use a can of whole peeled maters (preferably San Marzano), let them drain, and crush by hand. Very simple and perfect. 
    Sarasota, FL via Boynton Beach, FL, via Sarasota, FL, via Charleston, SC, via The Outer Banks, via God's Country (East TN on Ft. Loudon Lake)
  • Ottawa_EggmanOttawa_Eggman Posts: 111
    edited March 2012
    One thing to remember if when using canned tomatoes. Whole tomatoes will have the most the most flavor as they are only heated once and then canned. We have been using Buddy Valastro's (Cake Boss) recipe and like it very much. Puree tomatoes with immersion blender toss everything in a pot simmer until it reaches desired thickness 

    INGREDIENTS






















    1 28 ounce can whole peeled tomatoes
    2 Tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
    2 smashed clove garlic
    2 Tablespoons grated Parmesan
    1 Tablespoon sugar
    Salt to taste
  • I mince a couple of cloves of garlic into olive oil and slightly heat it before brushing the dough with it.  Sometimes I use pesto.
    I'm Kristi ~ Live in FL ~ BGE since 2003.
    I write about food & travel on Necessary Indulgences -
    You can find me on Facebook & Instagram, too! 
  • xraypat23xraypat23 Posts: 421
    I live in NY, i've been a pizza man since i was 14. I've never cooked my sauce. REAL simple is better. Whole canned plum tomatoes with basil, salt, pepper, oregano, fresh basil and a little oil, mix it in a food processor or with a stick blender, put thru a food mill if you don't like seeds and you're off to the races. That's IT!
  • GaryLangeGaryLange Posts: 236
    I use Dei Fratelli pizza sauce. I started using it when I lived in the Chicago area and now get some when I go back that way. It is a very good sauce if you can find it in your areas.
  • StoaterStoater Posts: 292
    Has any one tried this recipe, it has anchovy paste in it so I am guessing its has a good dose of additional umami, we have italian friends and they put anchovy paste in many of their sauces, not too much that you can taste the fishiness.

    It has had almost 1400 reviews many of which are 5 star:


    If you try it let me know how it turned out.

    Cheers!

  • tazcrashtazcrash Posts: 1,847
    I live in NY, i've been a pizza man since i was 14. I've never cooked my sauce. REAL simple is better. Whole canned plum tomatoes with basil, salt, pepper, oregano, fresh basil and a little oil, mix it in a food processor or with a stick blender, put thru a food mill if you don't like seeds and you're off to the races. That's IT!
    Amen Pat. (BTW, where u @? Im in NJ 10 minutes from GW)
    I Love the simple fresher sauce. Personally I'm not a fan of sauce that has been boiled for daaaaayyyyyysssssssss.

    However in a pinch, when cooking for my son, and a bunch of his friends, Cento makes a pretty decent canned pizza sauce.  
    Bx - > NJ ->TX!!! 
    All to get cheaper brisket! 
  • yzziyzzi Posts: 1,714
    edited March 2012
    I live in NY, i've been a pizza man since i was 14. I've never cooked my sauce. REAL simple is better. Whole canned plum tomatoes with basil, salt, pepper, oregano, fresh basil and a little oil, mix it in a food processor or with a stick blender, put thru a food mill if you don't like seeds and you're off to the races. That's IT!
    I've lived outside of Philly prior to moving to FL a few years back and I craved Norrisstown's tomato pie I grew up on. I now make my own and I like using the same sauce for my pizzas. It's pretty much just what xray stated, except I get cans of tomato puree (usually one with basil) instead of the whole canned plum tomatoes. The consistency is so much smother, and since it's just the pulp you don't get any bitterness from the seeds, and it's naturally a bit sweeter (plus no time through blender/mill/processor). I typically add some balsamic and brown sugar in addition to what xray listed.
    Dunedin, FL
  • xraypat23xraypat23 Posts: 421
    taz I'm out on long island. Way out east...lol. But I've had the pleasure to make a few pizzas in the first ceramic oven in Manhattan, the famed lombardi's coal oven pizza.
  • Great feedback !  I'm going to give xRay's approach a shot.  Will try Pastene San Marzano plum tomatoes as a starting point.

    Will probably be later this week before I can report back...but I definitely will !

    Tom 
  • tazcrashtazcrash Posts: 1,847
    Ah, good old east LI, Miss hanging in "the end"

    Bx - > NJ ->TX!!! 
    All to get cheaper brisket! 
  • Thanks for all of the suggestions and real life experience. Will make fine tuning my pizzas a great deal of fun!
  • UrbanEggUrbanEgg Posts: 34
    edited March 2012
    Incorporate the egg for making the sauce! Add a unique smokiness to a fresh taste by roasting the tomatoes on the egg.

    Exceptional on thin crust gourmet style pizzas in particular, the recipe below is straight from the BGE cookbook. However I found the colour too orange for my liking so I incorporated tomato paste and added balsamic vinegar, herbs, pepper flakes for some added depth to a zesty taste.

    2 pounds Roma tomatoes, roasted and cooled (the more ripe, the better)
    1/4 cup olive oil
    1/2 teaspoon of white sugar
    1 tablespoon of minced garlic
    1/4 cup white dry wine
    1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar or to taste
    1 teaspoon salt
    1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
    1 tablespoon tomato paste
    1 cup of fresh basil
    Fresh herbs from the garden such as rosemary, oregano and thyme.
    Ground pepper

    Cut the tomatoes lengthwise, through the stem end. Place tomatoes in a bowl with olive oil, salt and pepper, toss to coat. Place them on the grid @400 cut side down. Close the egg and roast for 2 or 3 mins, then flip for another few minutes.

    Once cooled, peel them, place strainer over a large bowl and gently squeeze to remove seeds. Keep the juices and discard the seeds and pulp. Coursely chop the tomatoes and place in a bowl.

    Heat oil in a medium saucepan on medium-low. Add garlic and sauté for 1 minute. Add the tomatoes with remaining liquid and, wine, vinegar, chili flakes and sugar. Tie up a handful of fresh herbs, stem and all and toss in. Gently simmer the sauce for 15-18 minutes until the sauce has reduced and thickened.

    Take out the herbs and remove saucepan from heat and allow to cool. Add basil and pepper and mix well. Place sauce in a blender or food processor and pulse for 1 minute or 2, until smooth.

    Enjoy!
  • SteveWPBFLSteveWPBFL Posts: 1,267
    Weeknight simple recipe: Mix some tomato paste and sour cream (vodka?), smear (schmear?) it on to desired thickness, add salt, pepper, garlic and your favorite Italian herbs (just plain ol' bottle oregano works just fine) and finish your pizza.
  • NewEnglandEggerNewEnglandEgger Posts: 104
    edited March 2012
    Here are the results from my 2nd pizza cook.  Sauce was just Pastene San Marzano tomatoes with oregano, salt, pepper and basil, based on Xray's nice and simple suggestion.   Toppings were shredded mozzarella, pepperoni and seasoned ground beef.

    Cooked at 600 with Platesetter feet up and a pizza stone on top of the grill grid.  

    Dough was store bought, and parchment paper was used underneath it for the first 5 minutes on the grill.

    Overall, the crust was good, but I did come close to burning it.  All other flavors were a bit on the bland side...so I need to work on cranking up the various flavor elements.  I think the first adjustment I'll make is using a bit of Tomato Paste to thicken up the sauce a bit so I can use more without getting the crust soggy.

    image

  • NewEnglandEggerNewEnglandEgger Posts: 104
    edited March 2012
  • tazcrashtazcrash Posts: 1,847
    the crust looks phenomenal! Nicely done.
    Can't wait to try my first pizza

    Bx - > NJ ->TX!!! 
    All to get cheaper brisket! 
  • scooter759scooter759 Posts: 245
     
    Its all about the tomatoes.
     
    And my world was just rocked a bit recently.
     
    I've been reading www.pizzamaking.com for a few years now, and there's a rather passionate (some would say anal) argument about the best tomatoes to use on pizza.  The general consensus was that geniune italian tomatoes from the San Marzano area, D.O.P. certified, were the absolute best for pizza.  
    Well, Cook's Illustrated did a canned-tomato tasting this month, and kind've turned that conclusion on its head; the italian tomatoes (Red Pack, etc) did very poorly, while Muir Glen Organics, and then Hunt's (!) Plum Tomatoes, came in first and second!
    I've tried Muir Glen before, and I wasn't impressed.  However, I used to make my spaghetti sauce with Hunt's, and I haven't tasted anything better (I can't find Hunt's Plum tomatoes here in Utard!)  
    Guess I'm gonna have to do my own taste test.  



    I agree it's all about the tomatoes. I saw a review on a food channel several years back that placed Del Monte at #1. Hunts didn't fair as well. I would guess its timing in this case.

    Anyway, I am very picky about the tomatoes in my sauces. Now that I'm living in Southern MN I grow all my own tomatoes and can enough to get through the winter. Prior to growing my own, I tried lots of different varieties of canned tomatoes, and I found these San Marzanos to be the best. As soon as I opened the can the smell was amazing. My Italian auntie told me about them.


     

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    2576 x 1716 - 504K
    Extra Large, Large & Medium eggs, Weber Summit gasser, Weber Q. Mankato, MN
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