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Gloves

butwhymalemodelsbutwhymalemodels Posts: 267
edited March 2012 in EggHead Forum

I typically have been getting by with an oven mitt or a pot holder (sometimes both) when grilling or smoking. I'm ready to begin moving my wok. I noticed, when seasoning it, that my puny little leather garden/work gloves weren't protecting my hands from the heat of the wok. If the coals are burning near 1200 degrees, wouldn't it be safe to assume the wok would be near that hot?

What gloves are you wokkers using to protect your hands?

A muslim, a socialist and an illegal immigrant walk into a bar 

Blogging: Never before have so many with so little to say said so much to so few.

Comments

  • Village IdiotVillage Idiot Posts: 6,947
    I have some thick cotton gloves and a pair of leather gloves.  Both are fine taking the wok off and pouring the dish in to a plate, but not enough for carrying it from the Egg to the kitchen.

    I am thinking of getting some welder's gloves.  The trade off is the balance between the ease of getting your gloves on and off vs. protections.

    In other words, I'm not there yet.


    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Gateway to the Hill Country

  • jerrypjerryp Posts: 226
    You can buy welding gloves at your local Harbor Freight for less than 5 bucks a pair, and I can assure you welding metal creates a lot more heat than your egg could ever produce.
  • jerrypjerryp Posts: 226
    PS.  The dexterity you loose wearing them is marginal versus severe burns.  Your not picking up small watch parts.
  • ChokeOnSmokeChokeOnSmoke Posts: 1,691
    edited March 2012
    I got these welders gloves from the Ceramic Grill Store with my spider and they are really nice:

    Packerland, Wisconsin

  • Keep in mind that, even w/ welder's gloves (which is what I use), that you can only grab the hot piece & hold onto it for only a few quick seconds. So, what that means is, have a plan of where you are going to put it, don't have any obstructions in the way, and get it out of the Egg & out of your hands ASAP.

    There have been at least a few folks who have bought metal foundry gloves (those big thick gloves that the folks who work in metal forges / foundries use). Some of them are rated at 2000 or so degrees, but the tradeoff is that they are basically HUGE mitts, so you're limiting your dexterity.

    Here are a couple Egg-samples:

    http://www.millersafetyproducts.com/GroupInfo/GroupID/23703

    http://www.allsafetysupplies.com/Chicago-Z14P2W-Zetex-Plus-Glove-14-Dbl-Palm-and-Thumb-Pair_p_237.html

    HTH,
    Rob
    Don't get set into one form, adapt it and build your own, and let it grow, be like water. Empty your mind, be formless, shapeless — like water. Now you put water in a cup, it becomes the cup... Now water can flow or it can crash. Be water, my friend. - Bruce Lee
  • HH - those examples are more like the ones I was looking at. The particular model was a Norbest 22, made by I don't remember whom. $63 at my local airgas, rated to 1300 degrees. Better safe than sorry?

    A muslim, a socialist and an illegal immigrant walk into a bar 

    Blogging: Never before have so many with so little to say said so much to so few.

  • I use fireman gloves. I have a pair of Shelby's like these:

    http://www.thefirestore.com/store/product.cfm/pid_2403_shelby_fdp_elk_pigskin_glove_with_gauntlet/\

    They are great for grabbing anything hot. If you really wanted to you can mix the burning hot lump with your hands with these on. I wouldn't recommend it but if you really wanted to you could. They are a little expensive but I think they are worth it. I’ve had the pair I use now for about 6 years. I will buy another pair when these finally get worn out.

    XL & Medium BGE Keller, TX
  • boatbumboatbum Posts: 1,261

    I bought welders gloves at home depot - forget the price - not real expensive.   Work great during lower temp cooks where I want to change the place setter or etc.   Not sure how they would do at wok temps ...

    Cookin in Texas
  • cortguitarmancortguitarman Posts: 1,991
    edited March 2012
    Ove gloves work good. Will withstand higher temps than welders gloves.
    Mark Annville, PA
  • washousewashouse Posts: 8
    Ten years ago I took up Dutch Oven Cooking as a hobby.  Purchase a pair of Leather gloves from the Lodge Cast Iron Cookware company.  Still using them and they came in handy tonight when through neglect I let my BGE run up to 700 degrees.  Because on them I was able to rescue my burgers before they got Cremated.  My wrinkled 75 year old hands weather the heat without a single singed hair. Now if I could only get some leather eye brow protectors I will be set for another 75 years. 

    https://secure.lodgemfg.com/storefront/product1_new.asp?menu=gear&idProduct=4069
  • onedbguruonedbguru Posts: 382
    CharBroil has some "grill" gloves - that are nothing more than expensive welders gloves with their name on it. I have a pair of welders gloves when I was actually a welder 30+ years ago - they are starting to wear through so my family got me the CharBroil gloves for birthday a couple of years ago - I would have just got another pair of welders gloves from a welding supply or harbor freight-like establishment, but it is the thought that counts.. ;)
  • RebellabRebellab Posts: 43
    I got a pair of welding gloves from A-Ox, they stop at our shop at work.  There were $12 from the sales guy.  The ones at the regular stores were not as thick of insulation.  I have really like them especially for steaks.
    LBGE

    South Dakota
  • ChokeOnSmokeChokeOnSmoke Posts: 1,691
    edited March 2012
    Keep in mind that, even w/ welder's gloves (which is what I use), that you can only grab the hot piece & hold onto it for only a few quick seconds.  
    Depends what your grabbing.  In this case (talking about a carbon steel wok), I'm able to grab the wok right off the flaming egg and carry it into my house where I put it on a pot on the kitchen table where I'm serving.  It probably takes 10-15 seconds and I don't feel any heat with the welders gloves from ceramic grill store.  Just saying.

    Probably not nearly as long if your talking about a hot plate setter.
    Packerland, Wisconsin

  • gte1gte1 Posts: 375
    I use the ones from CGS also, work great. If you get them there get a pair of meat gloves also. They are great for picking up any large piece of hot meat.
    George
  • Hillbilly-HightechHillbilly-Hightech Posts: 966
    edited March 2012
    Choke - you're right, it depends on the mass & overall temperature of the thing you're picking up. 

    All I know is that, even w/ the welding gloves, you can't hold onto a hot plate setter for more than a few seconds w/out having to drop it, having it break into pieces (don't ask me how I know that) :-\"

    I guess my point was that I didn't want the OP to get overly confident & think that the gloves allow him unlimited time of holding onto very hot things!!  [-X
    Don't get set into one form, adapt it and build your own, and let it grow, be like water. Empty your mind, be formless, shapeless — like water. Now you put water in a cup, it becomes the cup... Now water can flow or it can crash. Be water, my friend. - Bruce Lee
  • njlnjl Posts: 771
    I've got a pair of Pit Mitts that I'm pretty happy with.  I could use something though that's non-porous / non-absorbent that I could use to handle food on the egg.  i.e. say I wanted to just pick up a brisket or slab of ribs rather than grab it with tongs.    
  • njl - don't tell anyone this, but let's just say, hypothetically speaking, of course - that ya need to move food or pick it up and all ya have are your welding gloves - well, let's just say that the thought is that the heat of the fire will cook off any germs the welder's gloves might put on the meat when it's picked up (all hypothetical, of course)
    ;)
    Don't get set into one form, adapt it and build your own, and let it grow, be like water. Empty your mind, be formless, shapeless — like water. Now you put water in a cup, it becomes the cup... Now water can flow or it can crash. Be water, my friend. - Bruce Lee
  • ChokeOnSmokeChokeOnSmoke Posts: 1,691
    edited March 2012
    I've got a pair of Pit Mitts that I'm pretty happy with.  I could use something though that's non-porous / non-absorbent that I could use to handle food on the egg.  i.e. say I wanted to just pick up a brisket or slab of ribs rather than grab it with tongs.    
    I use these PVC coated gloves for handling big pieces of mean and pulling pork, beef, etc.
    Packerland, Wisconsin

  • boatbumboatbum Posts: 1,261

    Thank you ChokeOnSmoke for posting that link -- had heard people talk about those - did not know what they were called.   I want some of those but didnt know where to find.

     

    Cookin in Texas
  • Those pitt mitts look good... good price too.

  • MaskedMarvelMaskedMarvel Posts: 1,112
    I use the cheap "Grease Monkey" gloves for everything.   They're so cheap I can throw them in the laundry after using them and if they fall apart I'll just buy another pair.  Got them at Lowe's I think.  Not the greatest heat resistance or liquid barrier, but they are like a second skin for handling things quickly, and come with a golf towel I hang up while using the Egg that always come sin handy.


    Large BGE -- Greensboro!


  • rconercone Posts: 92
    I use a set of welders gloves or the Ove-Glove. The ove glove is easy to wash; but they are a bit pricey, I heard they Menards carries knock of version too. 
    Fat is tasty, everything else is filler.

    LBGE, SBGE, and a Carson Rotisserie 

    Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
  • horsefleshhorseflesh Posts: 204
    I bought the most rugged welding gloves Harbor Freight had and burned my fingers the first time I used them on a 350F casserole dish. They were totally useless, worse than a regular oven mit. 

    Then I got a pair of welding gloves from Central Welding and they have worked pretty well. With themI am able to remove a hot plate setter and put it down somewhere else, but you do have only a few seconds as others have said. I'm really interested in getting something even more heat resistant, though...
  • MaskedMarvelMaskedMarvel Posts: 1,112
    image
    IMG_0451.JPG
    3264 x 2448 - 2M
    Large BGE -- Greensboro!


  • eggoeggo Posts: 408
    Ove gloves work good. Will withstand higher temps than welders gloves.
    Got a couple of pair that wife hardly ever uses. I have welders gloves and their too bulky. Ove gloves may be the answer, gonna give it a try.
    Eggo in N. MS
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