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What to seal table with

meat73meat73 Posts: 140
edited February 2012 in EggHead Forum

What is everyone using to seal there tables they build for the egg.  It will definately see all kinds of weather here in Iowa.  I will get a cover of some sort for it.

 

Thanks

Comments

  • jbates67jbates67 Posts: 168
    I would go with the MinWax Helmsman spar urethane, excellent protective properties for outdoor weather, it's what I used on my red oak table.

  • I had tile put on top of mine.  Easy to clean and looks good.
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Just west of Austintatious


  • psalzerpsalzer Posts: 108
    Several coats of spar varnish!
  • meat73meat73 Posts: 140
    When they put tile on top did they put some type of backer board down like they do when you install tile in the house or what did they do?
  • Yes, he put the backer board on before the tile.  I posted this picture a couple of weeks ago.


    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Just west of Austintatious


  • I had my table made ay a local craftsman and he used tung oil. It is rather time consuming according to my table maker but it will last a very long time, mine is now 7 or 8 years and it look great and it spends most of the time on our deck in rain, sun, cold and the heat. I did hear that it's very hard to apply but will last longer than many syntheic applications. But now tile well that's another story. It does look great.
    Living the good life in MACDonna
  • I would def not use spar urethane , even though it's rated for outdoor , after 2 years it will yellow and peel and then you have sand and redo. I would use a teak oil since you can easily redo anytime and it hardens in the wood not on the wood. Food safe and great uv protection
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 22,730
    I had my table made ay a local craftsman and he used tung oil. It is rather time consuming according to my table maker but it will last a very long time, mine is now 7 or 8 years and it look great and it spends most of the time on our deck in rain, sun, cold and the heat. I did hear that it's very hard to apply but will last longer than many syntheic applications. But now tile well that's another story. It does look great.
    i used tung oil on some mahogany in my row boat, its stood up well now for about 10 years. i dont think it looks as nice as spar varnish, but a year later that spar needs some work, 10 years later the tung oil still looks ok. one thing i remember about reading on tung, not good to use near food if someone has a nut allergy but i dont see using a table as a cutting board
  • ChubbsChubbs Posts: 6,920
    Yes, he put the backer board on before the tile.  I posted this picture a couple of weeks ago.



    Is your bed and alarm clock on the other side of this frame?
    :))
    Columbia, SC --- LBGE 2011 -- MINI BGE 2013
  • It has to be true because real tung oil is from the Tung Tree bean in China. Great warning. I had not ever thought of that.
    Living the good life in MACDonna
  • The sun is your biggest enemy when it comes to outdoor finishes.  The UV breaks down most urethane finishes no matter which one you use.  Tung oil, teak oil, or boiled linseed oil would be good choices.  I use Waterlox which is a two part system consisting of an oil finish followed by a marine finish.
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 22,730
    It has to be true because real tung oil is from the Tung Tree bean in China. Great warning. I had not ever thought of that.
    thats what i remembered, not sure if its a concern with the table and i would use it
  • you might want to consider sikkens/cetol available at any marine store, a couple of coats of a stain, then 5 or 6 of the clear, Very nice stuff, makes teak on saliboats beautiful, i put it on my table. I am pleased.

    The stuff is not cheap, but covers a lot, you will have a quart a life time.

     

    XL   Walled Lake, MI

  • 3 coats of Sikkens cetol 1 on mine.
  • boatbumboatbum Posts: 1,273

    Marine varnish is definately the most durable - but also the most difficult to apply ( correctly and that looks good ) -- one of my hobby phases was wood working.

    I think a good solid polyurethane - floated on.   3 to 5 coats - light sanding with 400 grit - then 600 grit sandpaper in between.

    Final sand or so - use wet paper, with some moisture on the surface.

    Every couple of years - you will have to lightly sand with fine grit - recoat.   Really simple to apply, doesnt require alot of skill ( varnish does require skill to look nice ).

     

    Cookin in Texas
  • smaschsmasch Posts: 115

    I sealed with Behr Semi Solid Color Cedartone.  Laid out smooth and applied 3 coats.  Wipes easily and looks great.  For the cedar tables and such, I think the Spar Varnish is a solid choice and looks MUCH nicer. 

     

    Owner of LBGE, Antique Komodo Green in Color. Proud Career Firefighter. Johns Creek / South Forsyth GA
  • Sikkens Cetol SRD.
    Mark Annville, PA
  • eggoeggo Posts: 492
    edited February 2012


    Eggo in N. MS
  • eggoeggo Posts: 492
    edited February 2012
    I used readyseal on mine and it turned out great with 4 coats. Goes on easy. I suspect this to be mainly linseed oil with your choice of stain. My table is made with cypress wood.   www.readyseal.com
    Eggo in N. MS
  • What's the best way to protect this cedar table? Granite top will go on after I seal/stain, etc. I was thinking about using the Sherwin williams semi transparent stain or Behr one. Any thoughts on why not to use a stain with sealer built in?
  • stompboxstompbox Posts: 716
    The sun is your biggest enemy when it comes to outdoor finishes.  The UV breaks down most urethane finishes no matter which one you use.  Tung oil, teak oil, or boiled linseed oil would be good choices.  I use Waterlox which is a two part system consisting of an oil finish followed by a marine finish.
    I agree.  It is not sexy, but this is why I used an opaque deck stain/sealer.
  • Just to clarify it's rough sawn cedar.  
  • henapplehenapple Posts: 15,983
    Damn, after all that I'd use the nest and handler 
    Green egg, dead animal and alcohol. The "Boro".. TN 
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