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Charcoal difference

spalczespalcze Posts: 14
edited February 2012 in EggHead Forum
I had a question, is there any rear difference between the Royal Oak and the BGE charcoal? Will I taste any difference when cooking?

Comments

  • Hi54puttyHi54putty Posts: 1,631
    no difference...front or rear.
    XL,L,S 
    Winston-Salem, NC 
  • Yeah, BGE charcoal is a lot more expensive
    Jackson, Tennessee. VFL (Vol for Life)
  • Someone told me that the RO is a lesser quality of charcoal.  I had never used the RO before, and it is a lot cheaper, but I did not want my food taste bad though!

  • Someone told me that the RO is a lesser quality of charcoal.  I had never used the RO before, and it is a lot cheaper, but I did not want my food taste bad though!



    Nope....same exact stuff.
  • Thank you for the help!

  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 4,623
    You might want to check out the Naked Whiz's lump charcoal database. He has rated many brands by the amount of ash they produce, how much is big chunks, and how much is somewhat unusable dust, how hot it burns...

    The main problem with any lump is how much Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) is still in it. Unless you buy Japanese binchotan charcoal, which is almost pure carbon, and exceedingly expensive, the lump will have some VOC in it. The crucial thing is to let the VOCs burn off before putting the food on. Other than that, its just an issue of how much carbon there is in it, which equates with long hot burns, but hard starting, and how much residue there is, which leaves ash that clogs the air holes in the Egg.


  • These last  few years a much better, before about 1999 lump was very hard to find. I used kingsford for years and it was tough on long cooks. The temp was hard to hold, you had to dump ash every 3 or 4 hours, it just sucked! I dredded cooks longer than 8 hours. But back then I was a purist and I did what had to be done.
    Living the good life in MACDonna
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