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Is there a reason NOT to fill the Egg up with lump every cook???

MaskedMarvelMaskedMarvel Posts: 1,479
edited February 2012 in EggHead Forum
Greetings friends,

Seems a lot of fires have been going out recently...  I fill my Egg up with lump every cook - maybe a holdover from low and slowin' all the time.  But, I rebuild the lump before each cook, anyway, so I guess I don't get why you'd put less lump in?  

Maybe a rhetorical question...
Hope your Superbowl teams all win.  We're doing Costco pizza and ABTs here.  Go Cowboys!
8-Damien

Large BGE -- Greensboro!


Comments

  • tnbarbqtnbarbq Posts: 248
    I rake the used lump to allow ash and small pieces to fall through.  Then I top it off with fresh lump to about 2 inches above the air holes.  That seems to work well for me for most cooks.
    Scooter 
    Mid TN. Hangin' in the 'Boro. MIM Judge
  • I never fill the egg with charcoal unless I'm doing a long cook (butts, brisket, etc).  I suppose if lump cost 25 cents a pound I might do that.

    I try to gauge the amount of lump that I will need for a particular cook and then add just a little more.
    Jackson, Tennessee. VFL (Vol for Life)
  • Everytime you add new lump you have to or should wait for the VOC's to  to burn off. With used lump you've already completed that process and can throw the food on as soon as you get to the desired temp. I usually get 3-4 cooks out of a load of lump. Most of the fires that go out being discussed are during low and slow cooks which can be affected by a multitude of reasons. But I always clean and fill before a long cook.
  • I like to clean out all of the lump about every other cook.  I'll toss the very small lumps and keep the bigger ones.  Then, when I refill, I add the new lump from the bag first.  My thought is that the new lump is larger and will have more air between the pieces, allowing the fire to come up to temp easily.

    So, I don't fill it to the top, unless doing an all nighter.
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Just west of Austintatious


  • I do the same. Take my tongs and stir the fines down thru the fire box grate then add to about 2" above the air holes unless I am doing a long low and slow then I clean out everything and fill to top of fire box. I have a butt on now has been on for over 16 hours at 250 and there is plenty of "wood" left.
  • I'm not rich enough to fill it up every time. The only times I ever completely restock and completely re-fill is for long low and slows. Otherwise, stirring and sifting out the ashes and small pieces along with adding SOME new lump has worked just fine.
    "Take yourself lightly, but what you do seriously." - M. Martin XL BGE - Johnston, IA
  • I'm not rich enough to fill it up every time.




    I think that is his point, why do you feel it cost more to top off?  You still burn the same amount of fuel, just having extra available reduces the chance of "lack of fuel" conditions.  

     

    I try to keep double the amount I feel I need for each cook, just in case I would like to kick it up in temp at the end for any reason.

     

    -SMITTY     

    from SANTA CLARA, CA

  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 10,060

    Learned day one with the LBGE-Rule #1 You can never load too much lump!  See Smitty above-live by this one and you won't be wondering/sweating whether you can get the cook finished or not. Different levels of "too much lump" for hot and fast or low&slow-top of fire box or well into the fire ring but the premise holds regardless.

     

    Louisville;  L & S BGEs 
    Pit Barrel Cooker
    ABC- 
  • Peter CreaseyPeter Creasey Posts: 253
    edited February 2012
    After every cook, I totally empty the lump and save it then clean the BGE.

    On the next cook, I add new lump (so the larger lump is on the bottom allowing better air flow) then add the saved old lump.

    This whole strategy maximizes the desirable air flow during cooks.

    . . . . .  Pete

  • Ragtop99Ragtop99 Posts: 1,526
    edited February 2012
    The only times I ever completely restock and completely re-fill is for long low and slows. Otherwise, stirring and sifting out the ashes and small pieces along with adding SOME new lump has worked just fine.
    I generally do this. I don't aim for the minimum I need, but I don't see the need to light 4" deep amount of lump to cook a few hamburgers or Trex my steaks.   It think it comes up to cook temp faster when it isn't full and I'm not worried about VOC's from fresh lump.

    I empty the ashes every few cooks to make sure the air flow is good.
    Cooking on an XL and Medium in Bethesda, MD.
  • I could be wrong, and it may just be a few dollars and cents here and there, but I feel that I get the most bang for my buck if I don't have my "used" charcoal burning up while I'm waiting for the rest of the full XL egg to burn off and get ready. Do I have any science or proof? Absolutely not. I guess it's more of a "don't take any more than you need" or a  "waste not, want not" mentality (that may or may not be wrong).

    "Take yourself lightly, but what you do seriously." - M. Martin XL BGE - Johnston, IA
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 19,484
    i do more direct cooks than indirect, added space between the fire and the meat is good, rarely do i have an egg full of lump. if you want to save money on lump, learn to cook direct with raised grids and minimal lump, those indirect setups are costly with lump, you maybe burn twice as much with a butt cook using a platesetter than you would raised grid direct
  • CowdogsCowdogs Posts: 491
    After every cook, I totally empty the lump and save it then clean the BGE.
    . . . . .  Pete

    I love cooking on my egg, but not enough to do this...

  • Me either
    Jackson, Tennessee. VFL (Vol for Life)
  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    call me silly... but i look in the egg, and decide whether there's enough lump. if i want more, i add it.  if not, i just stir and light it.

    adding new lump means a little longer wait for VOCs to blow off, but that's no big deal.

    i only fill it when i think it needs it
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • Dear Silly,

    I agree with you. Exactly how I do it.

    "Take yourself lightly, but what you do seriously." - M. Martin XL BGE - Johnston, IA
  • choggchogg Posts: 30

    I normally will empty the coals and sift threw um..pick out the good stuf and reuse them...the rest I chunk..it is too costley to replace with new lump coal...The only time i use all new is before a long, slow cook.like a pork shoulder etc..

    I have found the only issue is AIR...make sure all the holes are not clogged up and the Egg can breath good..

    IF YOUR LOOKING YOUR NOT COOKING ..My Dog Likes it !!! C.Hogg....Shack Rag...GA.
  • choggchogg Posts: 30

    hay fishlessman..  I like the way your going with the heat..I started cooking all my pork at higher temps a while ago...# 1 . I like bark!!!!!

             # 2.  Cheaper than replacing all new lump.

             # 3 . Less time envovled with the whole process.

    IF YOUR LOOKING YOUR NOT COOKING ..My Dog Likes it !!! C.Hogg....Shack Rag...GA.
  • gerhardkgerhardk Posts: 893
    I really don't get all this talk about the VOCs burning off, if that was needed as the fire sinks into fresh coal you would get VOCs all through the cook.  To me it is important to get the fire to temperature and heat the dome so you don't have condensation build under the dome and rain on your food.  The VOC thing just makes no sense to me, actually I don't even know what VOC means.

    Gerhard
  • CowdogsCowdogs Posts: 491
    I agree. On low and slow cooks, when only a small portion of a larger pile of fresh lump is lit, 90% of the VOCs are going right past the meat.
  • Google it. VOC's don't have to be technically "burned". They are organic fumes that are removed by heat and air movement, namely the updraft through the eggs. So while very little of your lump maybe burning at the start of a cook the heat and airflow eliminates them within 15-30 minutes. Think paint fumes. And they can, and do affect taste of the food just like cooking with briquettes before the starter fluid is burned completely off.
  • Gotta Go for the clear smoke at 1st IMO

     

    LET'S EAT
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