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1st time brisket questions

billyraybillyray Posts: 1,124
edited February 2012 in EggHead Forum

Getting ready to do a brisket for the 1st time. I will use a packer cut. Trim the fat or not? Cook fat side down? I saw on the Whiz's sight about using the point for burnt ends, does the point slice up like the flat if you don't want to do the burnt ends, or which way is better?

Thanks, Bill

Felton, Ca. 2-LBGE, 1-Small and waiting on a mini

Comments

  • No trim and fat side up.  Only way to go imo.
  • I trim mine a little, but not much.  If it's got 2 inches of fat or more, I'll probably trim half off.

    I usually do fat side up.  That controversy will never be solved.  Probably doesn't make much difference at all.  To me, if I'm cooking low and slow (225-250), I like fat side up to baste the meat, but at higher temps, I like fat side down, so I don't burn the flat (left over from offset smokers, I guess).

    Some people like burnt ends so much, they joke about throwing the flat away.  I think it's overrated.  But, if you use the point for slicing, it gets somewhat fatty.  Some people like that.

    Just my 2 cents.
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Just west of Austintatious

  • bubba timbubba tim Posts: 3,216

    Don't trim and fat side down protects the meat. The theroy that the fat melts down the side keeps the meat juicy is false.

     

    SEE YOU IN FLORIDA, March 14th and 15th 2014 http://www.sunshinestateeggfest.com You must master temp, smoke, and time to achive moisture, taste, and texture! Visit www.bubbatim.com for BRISKET HELP
  • Don't trim and fat side down protects the meat. The theroy that the fat melts down the side keeps the meat juicy is false.

     

    lol.  Like I said, this controversy will never be solved.  The Egg distributes the heat throughout the cooking area, so you don't have direct heat coming up from the bottom.  As far as trimming, if you have excess fat on the point, trimming will cut down on the drippings.  Keeping 4 inches of fat on the point serves no purpose.

    @Bubba Tim.  Not trying to start a food fight.  I'm sure your briskets are to die for.  I'm just expressing my way, which works out rather well.
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Just west of Austintatious

  • boatbumboatbum Posts: 1,273

    google playing with smoke and fire   -- someone here pointed me to that - was very helpful.   There are lots of very good articles, opinions.   Trim, not trim,  fat up, fat down, foil/nofoil etc.    The most fun is take a stab at an approach, then next time, try it different.   Your own style of cooking and what you like in the results will determine your opinion over time.

    Long as you stay with the heat till after you get past the stall and up to 195-205 internal - it will work.   When it gets close - poke it with the thermometer - you will feel the difference when it is ready. 

    My opinion ( experts correct me ) - the most important thing starting out is heat management and cooking it all the way till done.

     

    Cookin in Texas
  • My opinion ( experts correct me ) - the most important thing starting out is heat management and cooking it all the way till done.

     

    That's approximately 100% of it.  The rest is ****.
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Just west of Austintatious

  • billyraybillyray Posts: 1,124
    Thanks for the input, looks like I'll have to cook about 12 different briskets over time to fine out what I like.
    Felton, Ca. 2-LBGE, 1-Small and waiting on a mini
  • boatbumboatbum Posts: 1,273
    That doesn't sound bad.....
    Cookin in Texas
  • Gonna chime in here because I am looking to do my first brisket soon. You cook to an internal of 195-205? Is there a reason you dont want this meat at med rare like other roasts. Completly naieve here when it comes to brisket, so please bear with me on this.
  • Brad,

    A brisket is a very tough cut of meat.  To cook it medium or m. rare would be like chewing leather.  The collagens need to break down to gelatin to make it tender.  Also, 195-205 is not a guarantee.  Use the toothpick test to check for it being ready.
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Just west of Austintatious

  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 6,916

    Below are good references for brisket info-(and the temp is "ballpark"-boatbum has the key-ease of feel with a probe, "kinda like butter")

    http://www.amazingribs.com/recipes/beef/texas_brisket.html
    http://www.bubbatim.com/
    http://www.nakedwhiz.com/recipes.htm
    http://playingwithfireandsmoke.blogspot.com/1996/03/brisket.html
    All the info you will ever need. Enjoy the journey-<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

     

    Louisville   L & S BGEs 
  • LyndeLynde Posts: 12

    I need some help well - cooking my first brisket for a Super Bowl party.  I picked up a LARGE 18.6 lb packer trimmed brisket.  I'm using the BBQ Guru DiGi temp controller - plan on cooking at 250 degrees to an internal temp of 185 (do fork test at 185).  Planning on inserting the meat probe in the flat  Guessing its going to take 16-18 hours to cook.  Does this sound about right?  Any suggestions?

  • That's a pretty good guess.  I bet you'll need to go a little higher on your I.T. though.  Start early enough so that you can get 2 to 3 hours of FTC in.


    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Just west of Austintatious

  • boatbumboatbum Posts: 1,273

    I would plan on 195 and above internal. 

    Cookin in Texas
  • LyndeLynde Posts: 12

    Thanks VI and Boatbum - guess I'll leave some more time just in case.  Plan on putting the beast on at 7:00 PM Saturday.  If it takes 20 hours due to size it would come off by 3:00 PM which gives me 3 hours WHDF.  I've had burnt ends at Jack Stack's in KC - they are great.  What do I do with the point to make burnt ends?  Same temp?  Leave point in one big piece?  How long to cook?  Any help is appreciated.

  • billyraybillyray Posts: 1,124
    From the Naked Whiz sight.

    Now, what about the point that you separated from the flat? We recommend that you make "burnt ends" from it. Put the point back in the cooker for another 3-4 hours to add more smoke and cook it even further. Then you can take it from the cooker, chop it, place it in a pan, add some sauce, and return it to the cooker for about another 30 minutes to add even more smoke. You can then use burnt ends to make sandwiches on cheap hamburger buns.

    Felton, Ca. 2-LBGE, 1-Small and waiting on a mini
  • LyndeLynde Posts: 12
    Billyrayy - after meat to temp I was going to remove the point from the flat and wrap the flat in HDAF and place in a cooler for 3 hours.  Question is what do I do to the point to make burnt ends - put back in the BGE after separating?  Leave whole or cut into pieces and wrap pieces in foil?  No clear on what to do here.
  • billyraybillyray Posts: 1,124
    Lynde  Put the point back in the cooker for another 3-4 hours to add more smoke and cook it even further. Then you can take it from the cooker, chop it, place it in a pan, add some sauce, and return it to the cooker for about another 30 minutes to add even more smoke. You can then use burnt ends to make sandwiches on cheap hamburger buns. So says Naked Whiz recipe.
    Felton, Ca. 2-LBGE, 1-Small and waiting on a mini
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