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cooking venison

jscarfojscarfo Posts: 328
edited January 2012 in EggHead Forum
a friend of mine has a rear leg of deer, its frozen and still on the bone he says he usually cuts it off the bone an puts it in a slow cooker for stew. my question is how to cook it on the egg, im thinking low and slow, looking for ideas.   thanks

Comments

  • SqueezySqueezy Posts: 1,101
    Bump
    Never eat anything passed through a window unless you're a seagull ...
    BGE Lg.
  • LongArmLongArm Posts: 16
    This is a little more complicated than domestic meat. The first question is where did the deer come from, and what was it's main food source? The taste and fat content of wild game is greatly influenced by what it eats and what part of the country it came from. Depending on how big it is, I like to have a "ham" cut into a top round, bottom round and a sirloin tip. These three cuts can be cooked just like their beef counterparts, usually.  I've had great luck with deer that I've gotten from northern Indiana, as well as north Florida. I think the key is what they eat. If the leg is not big enough to separate into individual roasts, then bone, roll and tie it, proceed like beef, and enjoy the venison taste.     
  • jscarfojscarfo Posts: 328
    It was shot in Connecticut I'm not sure of size I will find out thanks
  • hogaholichogaholic Posts: 225
    My son and I take 3-5 deer a year and I have cooked quite a lot of it, mostly burger and the tenderloins whole.

    When cooking the tenderloins I marinating the heck out of it. Poke some holes in there to let the marinade thoroughly penetrate the meat. I like simple rubs with a high pepper content. Cook to a final med rare.

    I won't have any experience with a whole rear leg. If you have a meat grinder you can grind it up into burger or mixt it with ground pork and make some brats. I use ground venison every week as burger (mixed with an egg and some breadcrumbs to hold it together) or chili, spaghetti, soup, etc/
    Jackson, Tennessee.
    VFL (Vol for Life)
  • On the tenderloin the best marinade I have found is Italian dressing.  ( I heard it from a friend tried it because I will try anything twice. Sounded nasty to me, But I was blown away its now my favorite way to marinate my deer tenderloin.) I have no clue what to do to the leg other than cut it in thin strips and make jerky out of it. haha. I do use my egg to make Jerky too because it can go low and slow. take pics I want to see since I am another hunter. Good luck
  • LongArmLongArm Posts: 16
     
    It was shot in Connecticut I'm not sure of size I will find out thanks
    Any idea what the deer primarily feed on in the area? If it's farm or row crops, the meat is usually much better tasting and needs little marinade. I use a dry rub, but have heard about the Italian dressing, although never tried it. Either way, it does taste different. A lot of people grind most of their deer. I only grind shoulders and any other scrap meat. The rear legs, or hams can be very tender and tasty if you butcher them with care, and as with everything, don't overcook. It will be much easier to get a good cook if you de-bone it, so it can be a uniform size, whether it's individual roasts, or whole. I do love jerky, and the previous post has me thinking......     
  •  
    It was shot in Connecticut I'm not sure of size I will find out thanks
    Any idea what the deer primarily feed on in the area? If it's farm or row crops, the meat is usually much better tasting and needs little marinade. I use a dry rub, but have heard about the Italian dressing, although never tried it. Either way, it does taste different. A lot of people grind most of their deer. I only grind shoulders and any other scrap meat. The rear legs, or hams can be very tender and tasty if you butcher them with care, and as with everything, don't overcook. It will be much easier to get a good cook if you de-bone it, so it can be a uniform size, whether it's individual roasts, or whole. I do love jerky, and the previous post has me thinking......     
    I hope this doesn't come across as blasphemy:  I urge you to put the shoulder in a crockpot with rice, etc.

    You can thank me later.
  • LongArmLongArm Posts: 16
     
    It was shot in Connecticut I'm not sure of size I will find out thanks
    Any idea what the deer primarily feed on in the area? If it's farm or row crops, the meat is usually much better tasting and needs little marinade. I use a dry rub, but have heard about the Italian dressing, although never tried it. Either way, it does taste different. A lot of people grind most of their deer. I only grind shoulders and any other scrap meat. The rear legs, or hams can be very tender and tasty if you butcher them with care, and as with everything, don't overcook. It will be much easier to get a good cook if you de-bone it, so it can be a uniform size, whether it's individual roasts, or whole. I do love jerky, and the previous post has me thinking......     
    I hope this doesn't come across as blasphemy:  I urge you to put the shoulder in a crockpot with rice, etc.

    You can thank me later.
    No blasphemy there at all. I totally agree. The shoulder is a tough piece to cook any other way, besides grinding it, or making cube steaks out of it....I forgot about that one, they are fantastic direct grilled, with a favorite marinade.  
  • jscarfojscarfo Posts: 328
    thanks ill try the crock pot
  • bigguy136bigguy136 Posts: 842
    I have some venison steaks. I'm thinking a ziploc in hot water till center is 80° then a 220° - 225° till the core is 130° with lots of smoke. Good? Bad?

    Thanks

    Big Lake, Minnesota

    Large BGE, Stokers, Adjustable Rig

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