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Beef Brisket Results.

Skkyhawke2Skkyhawke2 Posts: 8
edited November 2011 in EggHead Forum
Allow me to preface my comments by stating that I had endlessly read on BGE forums that cooking a brisket was the absolute high point of cooking on a BGE.
If one can successfully cook a brisket then they have arrived. So-be-it.
I cooked my first brisket.
Studied and followed all the suggestions as to temperature control, seasoning, timing, etc.
The Brisket came out 'good' as in successful. 
My disappointment came with the meat itself.
It was not tough. I cooked it to 190-195, wrapped it, allowed it to remain wrapped for 2 hours then let it rest for an hour before serving.
Again, it was NOT tough.
Had I been served this meat with my eyes closed I would have been equally happy learning it was nothing more that good old pot roast.
It was simply 'just' another hunk of meat.
Honestly, didn't know what to expect.
Figured it surely would/could top a standing rib roast or a beef tenderloin roast for quality and flavor.
Needless to say I was rather disappointed.
Not particularly convinced I'll be purchasing another brisket to attempt any time soon.

Comments

  • I think you have the wrong idea about brisket and you really can't compare it to a standing rib roast or beef tenderloin.  Brisket is one of the toughest pieces of meat on the cow.  The magic with brisket is to turn this tough piece of meat into gold.  You need to take it as a challenge, that when cooked properly, will become a juicy, tasty piece of meat.  I love brisket when it's properly cooked.  When not cooked just right, it's just OK.
    That's how I've always looked at it.
    Packerland, Wisconsin

  • njlnjl Posts: 853
    Why don't you give us more details as to exactly what you did / how you cooked it.  I've only ever done brisket in the oven...and our recipe is to cook it for a total of around 5 hours at 350 in liquids (water + wine) tightly covered with foil.  The real trick to our recipe is to cook it half way, chill it (overnight preferably), slice it, put it back in the baking pan, and finish cooking it.  When it's done right, it's so tender you have to fully support each slice, or they break when serving them.  We do flat cuts, 5-7 lb range, and they need to have some fat on them.  I won't buy them if they've been removed from the cryopak and trimmed by the store.

    I just did my second rack of pork (smoked on a large egg) and have been considering trying a brisket.
  • i've given up on briskets. I've done 4 cooks with briskets (all with similiar results) using different techniques offered on the forum (i.e. low and slow, foiled, injected, ovened, etc...etc...). I've never gotten impressive results (meaning any better than what i get in a crock pot). Note: I've only used flats since packers arent readily available. Not sure if that's my issue or not, but i'm having too much fun cooking other stuff to mess with it. 

    Greygoose

     
  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 5,102
    Allow me to preface my comments by stating that I had endlessly read on BGE forums that cooking a brisket was the absolute high point of cooking on a BGE....
    Honestly, didn't know what to expect.
    Figured it surely would/could top a standing rib roast or a beef tenderloin roast for quality and flavor.
    Whole briskets are not common where I live, (and rather expensive) so I don't have a lot of experience with them. Meaning, I have trouble hitting the sweet spot of both tender and moist, not moist and tough, or dry and tender. But they usually have a better flavor than rib roasts or tenderloin, if from nothing more than the many hours cooked with smoke.  Even the ones that turned out like shoe leather.

    I do in fact prefer chuck roasts, as they too take a long time cook, and are a little less likely to go dry than brisket.
  • I do in fact prefer chuck roasts, as they too take a long time cook, and are a little less likely to go dry than brisket.
    Can't think of anything I like "EGGed" better than pulled chuck roast, and they are so easy.  I cook them exactly like a pork butt, only take the internal temp a little higher (200-205).
    Packerland, Wisconsin

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