Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
Here are some of our new favorite non-beef burgers: Italian Turkey Burger, Grilled Tuna Burger and Goat Cheese Portobello Burger. You’ll want to perfect these before football season starts up in a few weeks! It's time to think about getting out to one of the many #EGGfests around the country - see a list here

Brisket Ruined - HELP!

Iceman5705Iceman5705 Posts: 83
edited September 2011 in EggHead Forum

Need some advice.  Did a 14 hour brisket cook and it came out terribly bitter and acrid.  Down right disgusting.

I followed the instructions for a long cook provided by naked whiz.  Sorted my charcoal by size and stacked it like a puzzle.  Started the fire in the center and put 4 chunks of hickory equidistant from the center on the outside so they would smoke during the cook.

Has anyone had this experience?  Is it the charcoal making it tast that way? Too much smoke?

$30 packer brisket junked.

Comments

  • SpoonSpoon Posts: 328
    I think it may be too much smoke. Hickory has a stronger smoke flavor than some woods. Maybe try oak next time and a litlle less wood.
    "Pork so tender you can pull it with a spoon."
    ~Spoon
  • While getting it started, it seemed like the charcoal was taking a while to burn clean.  I am wondering if the taste is coming from the gray charcoal smoke that is prevalent on start up.  Thoughts?  Was the charcoal not getting enough air? Did i have the charcoal packed too tightly?

  • BotchBotch Posts: 2,424

    While getting it started, it seemed like the charcoal was taking a while to burn clean.  I am wondering if the taste is coming from the gray charcoal smoke that is prevalent on start up.  Thoughts?  Was the charcoal not getting enough air? Did i have the charcoal packed too tightly?

    This.  You should let your charcoal burn until its clean smoke (just learned this myself thanks to this forum).  You can hold your hand in the beginning smoke, smell your hand, and that'll be what your meat tastes like.  Sorry it happened on such a large chunk of cow... 
    _____________________________________________
     
    I Know Why The Egged Bird Sings.
     
    Ogden, Utard.  
  • Need some advice.  Did a 14 hour brisket cook and it came out terribly bitter and acrid.  Down right disgusting.

    I followed the instructions for a long cook provided by naked whiz.  Sorted my charcoal by size and stacked it like a puzzle.  Started the fire in the center and put 4 chunks of hickory equidistant from the center on the outside so they would smoke during the cook.

    Has anyone had this experience?  Is it the charcoal making it tast that way? Too much smoke?

    $30 packer brisket junked.

    What temp did you pull it? Did you wrap it and let it rest for 3-4 hours? I over smoked one last year, I also pulled it a little to soon. 

    Sorry to read this I know how much work it is! 
    ~X(
    I'm ashamed of what I did for a Klondike Bar.
  • I cook my full brisket to 165-170. Pull it, wrap it in foil and put it in the cooler for a couple of hours. Many of posts talk of cooking to a higher temp. I did that once and it was terrible. Doubt it was over smoked.
  • LitLit Posts: 2,535
    As already stated hickory is a strong smoke flavor. I don't use hickory or mesquite anymore. Try to stick with a fruit wood like apple or cherry or an oak. I over smoked some ribs once and they tasted exactly like you describe. You can still trim off the outsides of the brisket to get rid of that flavor and atleast cube the insides of the tip and throw them in a skillet for burnt tips.
  • Sounds like creosote from the early burning charcoal or oversmoking. Can you trim the bark from around the outside of the brisket and salvage some of it for sandwiches?

    Pat
  • 4Runner4Runner Posts: 1,255
    Too much smoke and too soon.  I have done this before.  Make sure you are burning clean before starting.  Also, the recommendation for fruitwood is a good one.  Keep trying.  
    Joe - I'm a reformed gasser-holic aka 4Runner Columbia, SC Wonderful BGE Resource Site: http://www.nakedwhiz.com/ceramicfaq.htm and http://www.nibblemethis.com/
  • I've never used Hickory but I believe these guys here.   One other thing to watch out for is Mesquite,  it too is well known for turning acrid and nasty in certain situations.

    I've been to a few "Kansas City Rules" BBQ contests (just attending, not competing).   I watch what those guys that are in the serious competition do.   They use Royal Oak Lump charcoal.   And yes,  some do use the egg to compete with.  They use oak and cherry and apple.  I've never seen Mesquite used there.

    Good Luck !!

  • Thanks all.  I now know that I used way too much smoke.  As to salvaging any meat, although it was a big brisket, the nasty flavor permeated all the meat so I wasn't able to use it.

    I appreciate everyone weighing in and helping.  Next time we'll get it right.  Thanks again!

  • 4Runner4Runner Posts: 1,255
    Sorry to hear that. I know the disappointment...I have felt it many times. I have to laugh every time I read or hear how full proof the egg is. You can mess up meat easy on the egg. Keep it up.
    Joe - I'm a reformed gasser-holic aka 4Runner Columbia, SC Wonderful BGE Resource Site: http://www.nakedwhiz.com/ceramicfaq.htm and http://www.nibblemethis.com/
  • mollysharkmollyshark Posts: 1,519
    Hickory..one chunk.  ONE.  More than that and you have old tree.  I'm not a fan of fruit woods for beef, but some of that Jack Daniels barrel stuff works well also.  Mesquite is yucky no matter what you do with it.  An unnatural flavor.  Cook to 190. If the flat finishes before the point you can chop off the point and finish, but they will usually come out within a couple degrees of each other fast because of the increased fat layer in the point compensating for the thickness.  The muscle first breaks down at 160 which is the long plateau.  165-170 will get you an edible brisket if you luck out on the fat marbling, but 190 will nail it every time. 

    Make sure you have a drip pan under the brisket and the brisket up on a rack of some sort so the fat drips into the pan and not onto the coals.  Fat side up.  Lots of controversy on this but I like fat side up.  I do NOT use a plate setter.  Big roasting pan, vrack or something in it, brisket on top.  I think you just overdid the wood.  And yes, let the white smoke disappear as much as possible and then toss in the wood and put it all together.  Bug me if you have questions.  Have done a zillion of them.  Briskets, that is...yeah, questions also.
  • IQ2IQ2 Posts: 37
    I haven't done a brisket on my egg yet, but have cooked a kazillion briskets over the years. It is VERY easy to over-smoke. I have tried every conceivable wood, but pretty much settled on Oak. Pecan works well for me too, but none of them work if there is too much, too long. Sorry about the loss, they certainly don't give briskets away these days. Keep trying, I'm with mollyshark, always fat side up. Good luck on your next one, keep us updated.

    Paula in Texas
    Paula
    West Texas
  • Hickory..one chunk.  ONE.  More than that and you have old tree.  I'm not a fan of fruit woods for beef, but some of that Jack Daniels barrel stuff works well also.  Mesquite is yucky no matter what you do with it.  An unnatural flavor.  Cook to 190. If the flat finishes before the point you can chop off the point and finish, but they will usually come out within a couple degrees of each other fast because of the increased fat layer in the point compensating for the thickness.  The muscle first breaks down at 160 which is the long plateau.  165-170 will get you an edible brisket if you luck out on the fat marbling, but 190 will nail it every time. 

    Make sure you have a drip pan under the brisket and the brisket up on a rack of some sort so the fat drips into the pan and not onto the coals.  Fat side up.  Lots of controversy on this but I like fat side up.  I do NOT use a plate setter.  Big roasting pan, vrack or something in it, brisket on top.  I think you just overdid the wood.  And yes, let the white smoke disappear as much as possible and then toss in the wood and put it all together.  Bug me if you have questions.  Have done a zillion of them.  Briskets, that is...yeah, questions also.

  • Hey all, I did use the placesetter and drip pans filled to the brim with apple juice.  I think based on all comments and a discussion with an egghead friend of mine, we feel that it was definately over smoked.  I did two butts just a few weeks ago and they turned out awesome.  Only difference between now and then is alot more hickory on this cook.  I am learning.  Thank you all so much for your advice and encouragement. 

Sign In or Register to comment.