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Getting EGG to right temp

msdt323msdt323 Posts: 2
edited November -1 in EggHead Forum
Dear fellow EGGers,
I am having trouble getting my EGG past 400 degrees. Any thoughts? I have both top and bottom vents open and a Weber chimney full of hardwood charcoal emptied. How to get past 600 degrees for searing also. Thanks alot.

Joe

Comments

  • golfguygolfguy Posts: 105
    Make sure there is no unobstructed airflow and the ash/small pieces of lump are not blocking the grate. When I start getting to temps of 600+, I take the daisy wheel off.
  • When I had trouble getting temp up I found that the fire grate had a lot of ash. Cleaned out the grate, fire box, and underneath and had no more problem with temp. My cook tonight, IMAG0002.jpg
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Welcome to the Swamp.....GO GATORS!!!!
  • 2Fategghead2Fategghead Posts: 9,623
    Joe, Welcome to the forum.

    You say you have a Weber chimney full of hardwood charcoal emptied.

    Can I assume your you are using natural lump charcoal?

    What did you use to lite your lump?

    What size egg do you have?

    In total how much lump do you have in your egg? Is it past the fire box or just above the holes.
  • Grandpas GrubGrandpas Grub Posts: 14,226
     
    Physics... Heat = Fuel + Oxygen

    Check the oxygen flow through the lower vent, fire grate and up through the lump bed. Use a wiggle rod to clear an air path through the fire grate and you will get to the famous point of melting your gaskets.

    GG
  • I have a large and have figured out that it is pretty finicky if it gets any chunks stuck in the breathing holes below the lump. You definitely have to clean them out and all the ash before you fire up.

    Large BGE, Santa Maria Pit, Hasty-Bake Gourmet, MAK One Star Pellet Pooper,  26" Weber, 22" Weber Performer.  Most have custom handles made by me.

    http://www.amlwoodart.com

    "Just living from one cook to the next"

  • Grandpas GrubGrandpas Grub Posts: 14,226
    TheHandleGuy wrote:
    I have a large and have figured out that it is pretty finicky if it gets any chunks stuck in the breathing holes below the lump. You definitely have to clean them out and all the ash before you fire up.

    That's not correct. Other than a long or overnight cook I only clean the ash from under the fire grate every 8 to 10 cooks on the large. On the mini I need to clean out about every 4 or 5 cooks.

    I haven't cleaned out the ash behind the fire box in 3 - 3.5 years now and I have done a lot of cooking on the large.

    However, you are correct about having the holes in the fire grate and the holes in the fire box clear. If the oxygen can't get into the lump bed temperature is going to be an issue.

    GG
  • Grandpas GrubGrandpas Grub Posts: 14,226
     
    I had been testing some island chicken thighs trying to come up something unique. The mini had gotten pretty messy so last night I loaded the mini and let it rip. I knew I had better check on that little bugger but forgot all about it.

    I looked at it today and the gasket/adhesive had melted and sealed the dome to base 360°.

    GG
  • 2Fategghead2Fategghead Posts: 9,623
    Oh oh :ohmy:

    Now you have to get it open.

    Are you going to try to build a fire under the fire box? :huh:
  • Grandpas GrubGrandpas Grub Posts: 14,226
     
    A fire is the first choice. If that doesn't work I a blade for fabric cutting that is razor sharp and 8" long. Some vice grips on the end of that will cut most anything.

    Kent
  • I have had my gaskets freeze together in the winter up here in the northland. Take off the daisy wheel and drop a fire starter cube down, if there is enough coal left in there that works to warm it enough to get them apart.

    Not sure if it will work the same for you since they are melted not frozen.
  • This is DEFINITELY not what I have experienced. I clean out my Mini after every other cook, or it simply won't light (or stay lit, I should say) due to ash buildup. (Yes, I'm using good Royal Oak lump). My large needs a good cleaning less frequently.

    If I hadn't cleaned out my ash in 3 years, there would be no room for charcoal!
  • How much hardwood lump fits into a chimney starter? Perhaps you don't have enough lump in the Egg. Fill it up to the top of the firebox.
  • msdt323msdt323 Posts: 2
    Thanks for the replies. I will test it tonight.
  • Grandpas GrubGrandpas Grub Posts: 14,226
     
    Freezing the gaskets together is one issue and burning the gaskets together is another.

    I too get winter freezing.
    eggnsnow.jpg

     
  • Don't know what happened here. I had a nice reply... Oh well

    Large BGE, Santa Maria Pit, Hasty-Bake Gourmet, MAK One Star Pellet Pooper,  26" Weber, 22" Weber Performer.  Most have custom handles made by me.

    http://www.amlwoodart.com

    "Just living from one cook to the next"

  • tacodawgtacodawg Posts: 335
    You might check to make sure that the bottom half of the grate where the opening lines up with the vent outside is aligned.
  • GnaGna Posts: 1
    I too am having a problem getting my large BGE up to temp.  No matter what I do, I evidently can't get proper airflow. I am using Best of the West 100% natural mesquite charcoal.  I've cleaned it out completely, started over with fresh charcoal. I've used large lumps, small lumps, combination. I've used electric starter, BGE starters. I get the fire going strong, put the lid down, it goes to about 400 then drops to around 300 and stays there, regardless of venting. Firebox hole is lined up with airvent. Desperate to get cooking, I've even put a small fan near the vent hole to no avail. Thermometer is not off.  I have gotten it up to 550 once or twice but don't know that I did anything different. I'm not a novice griller, I know I can't depend on this thing. Nothing can be this finicky.
  • muttinmuttin Posts: 45
    i am a newbie to the egg only had it about 3 month but i cook on it 5-6 days a week and i found after about the first month i was having a lot of problems getting it up past 300. so i called the guy i bought it from he was very helpful. i was cleaning out the ash but the problem i had, was cleaning the holes in the fire ring they were full of ash and also i was using way to much charcoal for an everyday cook was filling that sucker up. since then i move the burnt coals around to get ash to drop through and then clean out them vent holes every time and it is working great don't really need a huge amount of charcoal for an every day cook. i am using starting cubes to start my fire and using dragons breath lump charcoal. the other thing i have changed is not dumping charcoal from the bag into the egg i put it in a tub then take it out with some gloves. keeps from getting all that small stuff in the grill. i did pizza this weekend at 600 degrees and then meat loaf at 350 Sunday and then fish at 325 last night. this grill is the best thing i have bought in a long time. 

    last night i timed it (because my wife thinks it takes to long sometimes ) to see after using 2 cubes to light it. temp was at 300 ready to cook in 8 min
     
    hope that helps someone out there 
  • I too am having a problem getting my large BGE up to temp.  No matter what I do, I evidently can't get proper airflow. I am using Best of the West 100% natural mesquite charcoal.  I've cleaned it out completely, started over with fresh charcoal. I've used large lumps, small lumps, combination. I've used electric starter, BGE starters. I get the fire going strong, put the lid down, it goes to about 400 then drops to around 300 and stays there, regardless of venting. Firebox hole is lined up with airvent. Desperate to get cooking, I've even put a small fan near the vent hole to no avail. Thermometer is not off.  I have gotten it up to 550 once or twice but don't know that I did anything different. I'm not a novice griller, I know I can't depend on this thing. Nothing can be this finicky.
    @Gna - it's not that "finicky" - you are having an abnormal (though not uncommon) issue. I think Muttin's advice will more than likely help you as well - make sure the holes in the fire ring are not plugged up.

    The thing is, I understand where folks can get frustrated & think it's the Egg's fault - but fire has been around quite awhile now, and it's possible to reach temps higher than 550 in most other grills, so it's silly to think that it cannot be done w/ the Egg.

    Try to look at it from a "troubleshooting" perspective - to start a fire & maintain it, you need 3 things: air, fuel, and an ignition source. After the fire has been started (ignited) then concentrate on the air or fuel - if you're convinced you have enough and the "proper" fuel (make sure your lump isn't damp, or has NEVER gotten damp), then you can concentrate on the air.

    Think of the bottom vent as the intake, and the top as the exhaust. It sounds like you're not getting enough intake. And that is why I feel, in my opinion, that you may want to check to see if the holes in your ring are plugged.

    Please check this & post back your results.

    Many folks have gotten the Egg to temps WELL exceeding 500 degrees - I have seen reports of folks pegging the thermometer, and the needle going back around (insinuating that the temp was over 1000 degrees). So, the Egg IS capable of very high temps - the difficulty lies in knowing what to do to get it there. It's like a Ferrarri - it can go fast, but if you don't know how to drive it at those speeds, you shouldn't be doing it!!
    :P
    Don't get set into one form, adapt it and build your own, and let it grow, be like water. Empty your mind, be formless, shapeless — like water. Now you put water in a cup, it becomes the cup... Now water can flow or it can crash. Be water, my friend. - Bruce Lee
  • GeekGodGeekGod Posts: 52
    edited August 2011
    This replacement grate will be a big help getting up to temperature quicker (I have one and love it!).


    PS: my Large BGE will do over 700 - the guage will peg so it is probably going much higher.   I use the BGE lump.

  • BotchBotch Posts: 2,362
    This replacement grate will be a big help getting up to temperature quicker (I have one and love it!).


    PS: my Large BGE will do over 700 - the guage will peg so it is probably going much higher.   I use the BGE lump.

    Thanks Geekgod!  I know I had seen that posted here before but couldn't find it; I can get my Large up to 650 but that's not the 900 or so I want for my Neapolitan pies... 
    _____________________________________________
     
    I Know Why The Egged Bird Sings.
     
    Ogden, Utard.  
  • Hillbilly-HightechHillbilly-Hightech Posts: 966
    edited August 2011
    Dear fellow EGGers,
    I am having trouble getting my EGG past 400 degrees. Any thoughts? I have both top and bottom vents open and a Weber chimney full of hardwood charcoal emptied. How to get past 600 degrees for searing also. Thanks alot.

    Joe

    @msdt323 - another thing that I have learned, based upon advice from other Eggheads, is to NOT worry about getting the ENTIRE Egg that high, because it takes FOREVER to cool back down.

    So, I went out & bought a small stainless grate (I think about 12" diameter). I just go ahead & start the Egg, wait for the "bad" smoke to disappear, and what I do is place that directly on top of the coals. Then, I place my steaks on those & sear. I do NOT worry about what the temp at the dome is, because for searing, I don't close the dome, and with the grate & steaks RIGHT OVER TOP of the coals, you're getting about as high of a temp as you can get!!!

    Then, after a good sear (anywhere from 60-90 seconds per side depending on thickness), I remove my steaks, wrap them in aluminum foil, and let them "rest" - while they are resting, I remove the small grate, and put the regular grate in, close the dome, & get the Egg to the proper temp.

    During the rest period is when I'll add my rubs, and let them "marinate" on both sides of the steak while it is resting in the aluminum foil.

    Once the Egg is up to temp (approx. 350-400), then I'll throw the steaks onto the regular grid & "roast" till desired temp.

    I've had FANTASTIC success w/ this method, and my GF actually says she doesn't like to go out to a restaurant anymore & eat a steak because mine are so flavorful!!!!

    =D>

    HTH,
    Rob
    Don't get set into one form, adapt it and build your own, and let it grow, be like water. Empty your mind, be formless, shapeless — like water. Now you put water in a cup, it becomes the cup... Now water can flow or it can crash. Be water, my friend. - Bruce Lee
  • DnormanDnorman Posts: 117
      Physics... Heat = Fuel + Oxygen Check the oxygen flow through the lower vent, fire grate and up through the lump bed. Use a wiggle rod to clear an air path through the fire grate and you will get to the famous point of melting your gaskets. GG


    This is correct, however moisture in the Egg can make it hard to get it up to temp,  I say Burn it out, get it as close to 600 as you can and bake it out.  then take everything out and clean all the ash.  then all problems should be taken care of.

     

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