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Do you use any filters on your camera

tsheehan7tsheehan7 Posts: 105
edited November -1 in EggHead Forum
I think a polarizing filter would help you a ton on some of these pics.
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Comments

  • BigjohnBigjohn Posts: 144
    I keep a polarizing filter on my camera most of the time. Usually take it off when I use flash at night.
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  • I always have a UV or skylight filter on my lens for protection.
    Often use a polarizing filter.
    Sometimes use a ND filter (mostly for blurring running water).

    Anything else can be done in Photoshop.
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  • NibbleMeThisNibbleMeThis Posts: 2,246
    I don't use a polarizing filter unless I'm shooting on water or around reflective glass.

    For my Egg and plated cooks, I just use a 50mm lens, manual exposure, and a custom white balance.
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  • Boilermaker BenBoilermaker Ben Posts: 1,956
    You're using custom white balance for your egg photos? You use a grey card?
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  • NibbleMeThisNibbleMeThis Posts: 2,246
    Kind of, it's a black, white, grey digital target. But sometimes I just use a white piece of paper:)

    I have to do a custom white balance. My egg is under a colored canopy and the afternoon sun causes all kind of weird lighting and colors.
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  • asianflavaasianflava Posts: 313
    Pepe Le Pew wrote:
    I always have a UV or skylight filter on my lens for protection.
    Often use a polarizing filter.
    Sometimes use a ND filter (mostly for blurring running water).

    Anything else can be done in Photoshop.

    Same here. I also like the ND so that I can get a shorter depth of field.
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  • probe1957probe1957 Posts: 209
    Unless there is a special effect I am going after that I cannot get in PhotoShop, I never use a filter. Speaking just for myself, it makes no sense to buy a $1000 lens then stick a $30 UV filter on it and call it "protection." Any filter is bound to degrade the image to some degree.
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  • Bear 007Bear 007 Posts: 343
    I'm with you, really don't see the need, Photoshop does everything for me.
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  • probe1957 wrote:
    Unless there is a special effect I am going after that I cannot get in PhotoShop, I never use a filter. Speaking just for myself, it makes no sense to buy a $1000 lens then stick a $30 UV filter on it and call it "protection." Any filter is bound to degrade the image to some degree.

    I bet you've never dropped a $3,000 lens. I have, and my UV filter saved the glass. As far as degradation, what is the largest enlargement that you have printed? Have you really done a comparison? I have, with a 20" x 30" print, and could not tell any difference whatsoever (with a Hoya filter). Good insurance, IMHO. If you print larger than that, I think you should be using a large format camera. But, if you feel better with bare glass, then I say go for it. :)
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  • The Naked WhizThe Naked Whiz Posts: 7,780
    Amen.
    The Naked Whiz
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  • "Sparky""Sparky" Posts: 6,024
    tsheehan7 wrote:
    I think a polarizing filter would help you a ton on some of these pics.

    You think a polarizing filter would help who a ton,and on which pics? :whistle: I use filters on all of my lenses(for protection from me mostly).My pics aren't great,but I am proud enough to share them with my friends here.Remember,most of us aren't professional photographers,we just like to share our cooking pictures. B)
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  • The Naked WhizThe Naked Whiz Posts: 7,780
    Yes, I'm not sure what photos he might be referring to. Food photos won't benefit from a polarizer. Typically blue skies and killing glare/reflection is what they are used for.

    If people wanted to improve their photos of food here, the number one thing I see that could be done is to use your camera's macro/closeup feature if it has one.
    The Naked Whiz
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  • tacodawgtacodawg Posts: 335
    I did not know you could get filter for the iPhone. Some pictures might not come out the very best but I figured out how to take the picture, send it to photo bucket and get it to post here. I think they get the point across. I wsh it was an easier process so more peole would post pictures. My next goal is to try to figure out how to put a pictue on my posts as a avatar or whatever it is called.
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  • tsheehan7tsheehan7 Posts: 105
    Hahaha. Now I see why I've gotten all these confusing responses. I thought I was posting a reply to Boilermaker Ben's beautiful photos of the national parks. They're great photos but the sky is washed out in most of them.

    Somehow I posted a new thread. Sorry for looking like such a dummy.
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