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Best way to move the egg??

HubHub Posts: 52
edited November -1 in EggHead Forum
Hi Folks,

I am purchasing an awesome new table today for my large egg. It is currently inside an old, worn out table. Being the only man of the house, I pretty much have to move the egg by myself. I have to get the egg out of the old table and into the new table. I suspect it isn't going to be easy. :(

Any suggestions? I don't care if I destroy the old table, but don't want to damage my egg or my new table. Thanks for any suggestions.

Comments

  • SmokeyPittSmokeyPitt Posts: 4,874
    Invite a neighbor over in exchange for some ribs, and consider one of these ;)


    Which came first the chicken or the egg?  I egged the chicken and then I ate his leg wing. 
    2014 Wing King's Apprentice
  • h20eggh20egg Posts: 168
    When doing a similar move I just removed the top and guts, the bottom was easily, well, maybe not EASILY, but safely moved, by my 120# wife and me. Wouldn't want to have had to have moved it far though.
  • 1. Use large Ty raps or if you still have the clips for the hinge secure the hinge.
    2. Remove the bolts that secure the band around the dome.
    3. Remove the dome.
    4. Remove the fire ring and fire box.
    5. Reach from the inside and use the air intake as a handle.
    If this feel to heavy get help!
    It's hard to tell from here if you can do this but I'm almost 60 and not a weight lifter and I didn't have an issue.
    WLL
  • TRPIVTRPIV Posts: 278
    When it's apart, it's still heavy, but not impossible heavy. It's more awkward than heavy.

    Take the grate, fire ring, and firebox out. With the dome closed - Loosen the nut for the hinge ring on the dome. If that nut is bent and not easily removed, you may want to get a new nut and bolt in case the nut breaks. Remove the dome. Now you should have the base and hinge as one assembly, and very thing else. Be careful with that hinge. Don't let it fly up and crack you a new set of eye brows.

    If you open the vent door on the bottom, you should be able to use that as a hand hold.

    Just go slow. Make sure the area around you is clear of obstructions and there is nothing to trip you up.
  • srq2625srq2625 Posts: 262
    Not a big deal. Remove the dome and the guts. Open the bottom draft door. Hook your strong hand (I'm right-handed so that's my "strong hand") through the draft door. Brace your other hand on the table and life. I don't think the large base unit weighs more than about 80#. Lower it carefully to the grass or onto a double layer of cardboard box if lowering to a hard surface.

    To carry it to it's destination, I dry off my arms (by now they're sweating a bit) and then squat down, clamp the base unit between my arms, and lift with my legs. The, more or less, dry skin of my forearms provides more than enough friction to keep the egg from slipping so the "clamping force" is really quite minimal. Carrying it that way, I could probably carry it a couple of hundred feet with no major issues.

    When you get it to the new table, reverse the procedure in the first paragraph.

    FWIW - I'm only 5'8", 50 years old, and not some sort of muscle-bound ape (I'm a desk bound software engineer).
  • JeffersonianJeffersonian Posts: 4,244
    Like the others, I removed the guts but I left my dome on. To pick the shell and dome up, I reached inside it and grasped the bottom vent, picking up the unit as a whole. It was surprisingly stable and slipped right into my new table.
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