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Garden Question

Desert Oasis WomanDesert Oasis Woman Posts: 5,604
edited November -1 in EggHead Forum
Do hot peppers help keep bad bugs away from tomato plants? Hurt the tomato plants?
Thanks ;)

Comments

  • beesbees Posts: 335
    I would contact your local or state extension office. I am a master gardener and have used such a trick to help but would not be able to help with what local peppers to use with whatever variety of tomatoes you intend to plant.You might have a master gardeners help line linked to the extension service.Let me know if I can help. Randy
  • FluffybFluffyb Posts: 1,815
    Hornworms, those nasty creators, will also attack pepper plants, though not their first choice. I've heard marigolds will help.
  • HossHoss Posts: 14,587
    My Grandmother used to plant marigolds between her tomato plants.Back then they dusted the plants with"Black Molly"too.It had DDT in it! :woohoo: ;) She lived to 99. :) Not sure about the answer to your question.You can get a TON of info from your local extension service and county agent.Should be under USDA.
  • MetalheadMetalhead Posts: 668
    I have heard that basil in between tomato plants will help keep the bugs off the tomato plants.
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 15,720
    i have asparugus behing the tomatoes and mint nearby, tomatoes are supposed to ward off asparagus beetles (poison works better :laugh:) have mint nearby, nothing hurts mint except rum and bourbon. ;)
    lifted this from the net

    TOMATOES: Tomato allies are many: asparagus, basil, bean, carrots, celery, chive, cucumber, garlic, head lettuce, marigold, mint, nasturtium, onion, parsley, pea, pepper, marigold, pot marigold and sow thistle. One drawback with tomatoes and carrots: tomato plants can stunt the growth of your carrots but the carrots will still be of good flavor. Basil repels flies and mosquitoes, improves growth and flavor. Bee balm, chives and mint improve health and flavor. Borage deters tomato worm, improves growth and flavor. Dill, until mature, improves growth and health, mature dill retards tomato growth. Enemies: corn and tomato are attacked by the same worm. Kohlrabi stunts tomato growth. Keep potatoes and tomatoes apart as they both can get early and late blight contaminating each other. Keep apricot, dill, fennel, cabbage and cauliflower away from them. Don't plant them under walnut trees as they will get walnut wilt: a disease that attacks tomatoes growing underneath walnut trees.
  • Dimple's MomDimple's Mom Posts: 1,740
    Are you talking about companion planting and interspersing hot pepper plants with tomatoes? (I don't think it will make a difference.) Or are you talking about spraying some sort of hot pepper concoction directly onto your tomato plants? (No idea if that will work of not. You could try it on only some of the plants and compare, but I think it might harm the plants instead of help.)

    By bad bugs, I assume you mean the worms. If you are wanting an organic treatment, I think picking (the worms off) is the best!
  • Dimple's MomDimple's Mom Posts: 1,740
    Hey, Randy, I'm an MG as well (in Island County, WA). Just got done teaching a 'cooking with herbs' class yesterday at our annual Whidbey Gardening Workshop. My feet still hurt for all the prep, set up, etc. Three or four days of straight standing and walking (the standing is the worst for me) is a killer!
  • beesbees Posts: 335
    That's Very interesting. I just taught the new MG intern class about pollination and Honey Bees. Do you have an Advanced MG level? Randy
  • Dimple's MomDimple's Mom Posts: 1,740
    We do not. We have to take 10 hours of advanced CE every year. Our entire program is in flux right now. We have a new director (for our county) and he's not a people person. Has alienated a huge percentage of the people and morale is down. This year they have really cracked down on making sure that people do all their hours, including CE and they have cracked down on the classes that are eligible.

    So you do bees? I sometimes attend our local group, Whidbees. I had wanted to get some hives, then read up on it for about a year and decided with all the problems bees are having, it was too much work and expense for such an iffy thing. So I went the mason bee route. Then we moved onto a property with 3 abandoned hives. So I'm still keeping it as an option and attend classes and meetings when I can.

    I continue to do the mason bees every year but have never been real successful at getting them to come back without me having to buy new bees every year. At $25 - $30 a tube, it's a bit pricey. I usually wait til it's late in the season and the buyer at my local store is a good friend and she sells me their leftovers at half off.

    In the meantime, the abandoned hives are still in the yard. The first year we lived here, I turned one of them into a planter. They all are sort of falling apart now. The plum orchard they sit under is desperately in need of pruning and the whole area is sort of abandoned and wild. I would like to get it back under control someday.
  • beesbees Posts: 335
    Yes I am keeping bees for the second time. The frist was when we had a farm outside of town that was in the 70's,and at that time there were minimal problems now there is a dozen or so of them, it't sad. We have to have 20 CEU and 25 volunteer, it's really not hard. I'm about to complete an Advanced MG level specialty in Bees and Pollination. If you start back I'll help as I can.Take care, Randy
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