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Hot-Tubbed Steak Question!

OconeeDawgOconeeDawg Posts: 148
edited November -1 in EggHead Forum
I can't seem to find a link to the Hot-tubbed Steak method. Can someone send me the link or give a little direction? Thanks!
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Comments

  • HossHoss Posts: 14,587
    You just place the steak(in a foodsaver or ziploc Freezer bag) in 100-110F water to soak for an hour or so before grilling.You may have to add more hot water to keep the temp up that long.It depends on what you sre hottubbing in.
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  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    you're just warming up the steak. don't get caught up in temps and times... steaks into a ziploc, suck the air out, and sink into a bowl of hot tap water. give it 20 minutes or so to come up to temp. might need a change of water or two also.

    then throw it on and sear to your liking. it will cook much faster. use the thermapen
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
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  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    nice write up. i'd offer that the lo-burner stock pot isn't necessary really, as your tap water will be more than hot enough. but both work
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
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  • thirdeyethirdeye Posts: 7,428
    7a2c3de0.jpg

    ...rest of the technique. That is, the salting. When this method was published by Cooks Illustrated, they recommended salting the steak for at least three hours. Then the last hour is spent in the warm water bath. (So, for the minimum it would be salting the steak and holding it in the fridge for 2 hours, then 1 hour in the water bath)

    Salt draws juices to the surface, where they eventually dissolve the salt; the juices are then reabsorbed in the form of a flavorful, concentrated "brine," bringing out beefy flavors and masking livery ones.
    Happy Trails
    ~thirdeye~

    Barbecue is not rocket surgery
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  • RRPRRP Posts: 14,882
    plus I use canning salt as it is much finer and seems to dissolve quicker than the coarse Kosher salt crystals.
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
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  • thirdeyethirdeye Posts: 7,428
    Right, plus it dissolves at a lower temperature which makes it great for making brines.

    And for those that may experiment with different salts in different applications, be sure to go by weight. In other words, if your recipe calls for a tablespoon of kosher salt (which is coarse), a tablespoon of canning salt or fine grind sea salt will be too salty because it's grain is finer.
    Happy Trails
    ~thirdeye~

    Barbecue is not rocket surgery
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  • RRPRRP Posts: 14,882
    and here's another interesting site about salt.
    http://www.mortonsalt.com/salt_guide/index.html
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
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  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    i agree. i think, though, that here (and maybe only here) hot tubbing has become a separate 'thing'.

    i personally don't do it to the specs of the cooks illustrated article simply because i don't carry it around in my head... i just do it to warm the meat before slapping the heat to it. in order to maximize the preferred cross section of "med-rare"-ness.

    to me, the "hot tub" method is cooks'-method-lite. more about taking the chill off than anything.

    i know you know this, but just using this as an illustration. maybe it will keep adam happy :laugh: left is a steak put on the egg cold, cooked to med-rare. right is a pre-warmed (one way being hot-tubbed) hot_tubbed_steak.jpg
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
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  • RicklesssRicklesss Posts: 391
    Man! what a great write up :)
    Ton's of super helpful info, and even a really cool drawing, I'm so thankful to be here, and learn from you all.
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  • 407BGE407BGE Posts: 187
    Stile has the explanation done perfectly. This method of cooking is called sous vide and is French for "under vacuum" as the meat is in a bag.

    This method works for steaks but I have done a roast using this method and it's unreal. Next time I do it I'll toad pictures but the same principle is true butthe roast is even thicker.

    For a roast or steaks I fill a cooler almost full with 120 degree water and then the temp does not drop due to the amount of water and the fact that's it in a cooler. For a roast, I'll go for 3 hours to get the whole roast up to 120ish.

    Throw it on a hot egg for crust and then slice. Another nice thin using this method is that the meat does not have to rest after cooking.
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