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Basic Pizza Question

KyEggKyEgg Posts: 23
edited 8:56PM in EggHead Forum
I've spent some time searching the forum and can't find an answer to this question, probably because it is so basic. How do you get your dough with all your toppings on to the pre-heated pizza stone? In my mind the dough is so soft you couldn't pick it up from the sides or it would tear.

Thanks in advance.
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Comments

  • Based on your question I assume you don't have a bakers peel.
    Without one the easiest thing is to make the Pizza right on top of parchment paper. You can slide the pie around by pulling on the edges of the parchment and even put it right on the pizza stone. After a few minutes on the egg you can slide the parchment out and the crust will be directly against the stone.
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  • RRPRRP Posts: 15,837
    Pizza peels - there are different types - here's mine
    IMG_2158.jpg
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
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  • What Gulf Coast says works. I have a couple of pizza screens. More sable to transfer onto the Egg. Same process though. Place screen and pie onto the stone. A few minutes later. Remove the screen. You can buy screens at most kitchen/rest. supply stores.
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  • Carolina QCarolina Q Posts: 8,471
    What he said. Folks who use peels, typically sprinkle them with corn meal before placing the dough on them. Makes the pizza slide off easily. As you're adding toppings to your dough, shake the peel from time to time so the dough doesn't stick. When you're done, it should just slide right off onto the pizza stone.
    Michael 
    Central Connecticut 

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  • KyEggKyEgg Posts: 23
    I see, thanks. Any peel better than another (wood vs metal)?
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  • KyEggKyEgg Posts: 23
    I see, thanks. Any peel better than another (wood vs metal)?
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  • Simple and effective would be to lighty dust a parchment paper the size of your pizza stone approx. Roll out your pizza (by hand if possible - warm 1 day aged dough) and lay the dough on the lightly floured parchment paper. Make sure the paper is left square so you can pick up the the topped pizza to transfer it to your preheated Egg (on for 30-40 min with pizza stone on plate setter legs down on fire ring).

    When the pizza rises or goes lighty golden remove the paper by holding the in place with a burger fipper and pull the paper from underneath. Check bottom of pizza after a minute has elapsed, so you can gauge how your pizza dough reacts with the heat of the stone.

    Practice makes perfect...don't give up, it will get really fun when you master this step.


    Marc
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  • All give good advice. I can give you a couple more ideas. Pizza screens are the easiest, and you CAN leave it on the stone until the pizza is completely cooked. The bottom will be cooked and crisp, don't worry. Then just remove the screen and the pizza comes off on your counter, or whatever. Here's my favorite picture of Fidel's pizza:

    Setup1217108.jpg

    I tried using a peel last month, instead of using a screen. I had used semolina in the crust and it was handy, so I sprinkled that on the peel instead of cornmeal or flour--which works too. The dough round moved around on that peel like it was on BALL BEARINGS!!! Cornmeal doesn't compare with it.

    Don't overload the dough with lots of toppings. If it sits on the dough that is on top of the cornmeal or flour for too long, the dough can get soggy and it sticks to the peel. DISASTER! Put the toppings on quickly and get it onto the stone before that happens.

    Judy in San Diego
    Judy in San Diego
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  • You can leave the parchment under the pie until the pizza is done as well. It will only burn where it is exposed and the crust will still get nice and crisp/brown.
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  • Hey Judy,

    Just a tip for that screen, maybe you already now this but that screen look to new or clean. Pizza screens have to heat treated before you use them. Brush them with olive oil and burn it to brown or black. When it cools put your dough on it and it should not stick at all. Try not to take your time when topping and allow no moisture between the screen and the dough.

    If you read above at my last comment, try using parchment paper.

    Your Pizza does look great!

    Happy Egging

    Marc
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  • Agreed! All doughs bake differently, see what works for the cook. ;)

    Marc
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  • That picture is Fidel's, not mine, I'm just his (unpaid) PR person. I wonder what Fidel would say In any of his fluent languages about his screen being too new or too clean?

    Judy
    Judy in San Diego
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  • Screens should be heat treated so the dough does not stick and to clean them aswell. All pizza joints that use them do that. I have been making pizza for 17 years now and I have gotten really familiar with picking up a pizza with my custom made stainless peel.

    When I was in Napoli, Italy this past summer my wife found it really easy to make it right on top of a wood peel that was floured before putting the dough on top. The wood was also treated with olive oil for years (done once a year - 2 times a year for the first 2 years if new). The wood is like a maple not pine, the wood is not very poris and the oil help close the pores. If you buy a wood peel oil it the night before that way it soaks in good.

    Only trying to help.

    Marc
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  • Primeggister1 - Just use standard olive oil on the peel? Do you just rinse with water after use?
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  • RRP- Your would peel looks like it has a finish applied to it- is that polyurethane?
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  • SmokeyPittSmokeyPitt Posts: 6,866
    This may not be the best approach, but I pre-heat the stone just a little (where it is warm but I can still handle it with my hands), then I make the pizza right on the stone. This also solves the problem of the crust burning before the pizza is done. Of course, this only works if you are making one pizza.


    Which came first the chicken or the egg?  I egged the chicken and then I ate his leg. 

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  • FidelFidel Posts: 10,168
    Just for the record, that screen has cooked well over 100 pizzas. Never once had one stick.
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  • Fidel, that has got to be one of the best pictures of an Egg "egging" a pizza I've ever seen! Send it to BGE so they can use it in their next cookbook!

    Steve
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  • RRPRRP Posts: 15,837
    Steve,

    Sorry - I just saw your question. When I bought that raw wooden peel 9 years ago I applied 3 coats of Behlen brand Salad Bowl Finish. That's a nontoxic, food safe cured finish. To this very day I've never applied any more and it still cleans up super well and has never been stained by grease or whatever. I would recommend it! BTW it comes in a quart, but all I needed was a pint for the 3 coats.

    Ron
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
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  • Was just trying to help, sorry if I affened you. Pizza looks great.
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  • RRPRRP Posts: 15,837
    The purist here say the wooden is the best, but I prefer my metal one, but cut and serve on my wooden one. As for the canvas covered one in the middle that's a Super Peel and is really handy moving a gooey crust off on to your stone. Here's the site for a demo of how it works:
    http://www.superpeel.com/videos.html
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
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  • Standard olive oil is fine and lightly wash when your all your pizzas are done, and re apply oil when dry (next day) so you are ready for your next cook.
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  • RRP - Thanks for the info. I will look into doing mine that way.
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  • FidelFidel Posts: 10,168
    Never said I was offended, I'm more the type to be an offender than an offendee.
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