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need input on blackened prime rib

East Bay AlEast Bay Al Posts: 101
edited 9:35PM in EggHead Forum
Howdy all- My wife has decided we should have blackened prime rib for NY Eve dinner. She had it in a New Orleans restaurant years ago and loved it.
I have to say I am sceptical about blackening an $80 piece of meat. I took a look at the recipe section and the archives, and didnt find a single reference.
Has anyone tried this? Had this? Have suggestions or a recipe to pass along?

Thanks

Comments

  • Al,

    Sounds interesting, is it boneless? I would think it would be hard to do a traditional blackening with the bones in. I can see a steak.

    Steve

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • cookn bikercookn biker Posts: 13,407
    I really like Paul Prudhomme's blackening seasoning.
    Molly
    Colorado Springs
    "Loney Queen"
    "Respect your fellow human being, treat them fairly, disagree with them honestly, enjoy their friendship, explore your thoughts about one another candidly, work together for a common goal and help one another achieve it."
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    LBGE, MBGE, SBGE , MiniBGE and a Mini Mini BGE
  • Carolina QCarolina Q Posts: 10,703
    This sounds intriguing! Wonder if it was it blackened whole at a high temp, then roasted til done at a lower temp? Don't see how that would really work. Or was it roasted first to a very rare temp, then cut up and the individual servings blackened. Or not roasted at all, just cut up and blackened.

    Try it on a ribeye first! :)

    I will not eat oysters. I want my food dead. Not sick, not wounded... dead.

                                                      Woody Allen

    Michael 
    Central Connecticut 

  • I have blackened ribeyes (boneless, aged prime typically) on a few occasions and really like them. I typically hot tub the steak to an internal of 110 to 112 F, and then apply blackening spice to the outside, prior to dropping it onto my hot griddle in the egg (typically at about 500F or a little higher). 60 or so seconds per side is about all it takes. Be careful, you are cooking the steak on the griddle, and too long will overcook the steak internally. I also brush with butter as I turn the steak (like a prime rib or ribeye isnt enough fat and goodness :whistle: :cheer: :ermm: )!!!

    For your prime rib, I would probably roast the whole prime rib roast first, let it sit for 20 minutes tented, and then slice into steaks, spice and blacken. If you are blackening the whole prime rib, you might finish roasting at a lower internal termperature than you want your finished blackened steaks to be. This is likely how it was prepared for your wife. Not sure I would try blackening a whole prime rib - dont think that is what they are referring to. If you have your egg and griddle hot and ready to go, you could do this right before sitting down to eat.

    Finally, IMHO, I like the Paul Prudhomme Blackened Redfish Magic much better than the Beef Magic (which has a slightly curry flavor to me). I just think the blackened redfish spice has the true flavor of what blackening is, beef, chicken or fish.

    The suggestion by Carolina Q to go get a few ribeyes and try it first is a solid piece of advice ;) !!!! Hot tubbing and then blackening likely best mimics the roasting and blackening scenario.

    Good luck!
  • Molly,

    Pssst. Chef Paul invented blackening B)

    Steve

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • One more quick piece of advice. Go buy the prime rib tomorrow, unwrap, and put it in your fridge to dry age for the next 12 days. If intrested, search dry aging and you will get a wealth of information regarding dry aging. There are folks on this forum that are dry aging experts for sure!!!

    Have fun!
  • Really???!!! My dad told me that blackening was what he invented as he cooked...I mean burned the dog sh&@ out of...cheap pieces of meat in the back yard :S :unsure: :sick: !!!

    Man, that Paul P makes some tasty blackening spice!!!
  • Dave,

    :laugh: :laugh: B)

    Steve

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • Carolina QCarolina Q Posts: 10,703
    LFGEnergy wrote:
    The suggestion by Carolina Q to go get a few ribeyes and try it first is a solid piece of advice ;) !!!!

    HAHAHAHAHA! Good one, Dave!! As if I had even the slightest clue!! Just seemed like a reasonable idea. :blush: :laugh:

    I will not eat oysters. I want my food dead. Not sick, not wounded... dead.

                                                      Woody Allen

    Michael 
    Central Connecticut 

  • Just an experience thing...maybe more in life than in cooking....like attorneys say, "Know the answer before you ask the question" ;) ! Not big on experimenting on guests, or is that "with" guests?!?!?
  • Carolina QCarolina Q Posts: 10,703
    unless they are inlaws. :)

    I will not eat oysters. I want my food dead. Not sick, not wounded... dead.

                                                      Woody Allen

    Michael 
    Central Connecticut 

  • Thanks guys (and gals) I was thinking to try it on smaller pieces (steak) w/o company, so we are on target there. I do blackened catfish now and again, but prime rib- thats for some Worchestershire and horse radish! But blackened does sound intriging- worth a try.
    I only wish the fridge had enough space to dry anything!
    Pam cant remember if the edges were done blackened (roast) or if it was steaked- I'm leaning toward a high temp sear, then the usual lower roast.
    What do you mean by hot tubbing? If the meat starts out warmish, dont you end up with a smaller pink center?
    Thanks again for all the help.
    Al
  • thebtlsthebtls Posts: 2,300
    Just my two cents...first, why blacken a prime rib and second why dry age it...you risk ruining that $80 piece of meat with both. Just cook the meat man...it's prime rib! Doesn't require a lot of fuss in my home anyway.
    Visit my blog, dedicated to my Big Green Egg Recipies at http://www.bigtsbge.blogspot.com You can also follow my posts on FaceBook under the name Keep On Eggin' or the link http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Keep-On-Eggin/198049930216241
  • MikeeMikee Posts: 798
    I'll call your two cents. While it is tough to dry age beef for most of us; letting it dry a few days does wonders. Without all that excessive water inside the meat does not boil when cooked. Juices do not flow out of the meat and the meat remains juicer after the cook. When the meat is cooked to the desired temperature, the meat will be still be red/pink in the middle yet at the proper temperature.
  • Hot tubbing is a method to warm the inside of the steak prior to finishing exterior on the egg at high temp. You place the steak(s) in a plastic bag, and submerge the steaks in a pan of hot water for 45 minutes or so, until they reach the desired internal temperature. Then the egg finishes the outside (my favorite is Pittsburg style, which puts a black char on the exterior while the interior remains pink).

    Type "hot tubbing" into the search, and you will get many posts, some with pictures, of the method which better explain than I can type. It is the only way I do steaks anymore.
  • thebtlsthebtls Posts: 2,300
    Bottom line for me; I pay Anything over $20 for a piece of meat it goes on the grill the same night...
    Visit my blog, dedicated to my Big Green Egg Recipies at http://www.bigtsbge.blogspot.com You can also follow my posts on FaceBook under the name Keep On Eggin' or the link http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Keep-On-Eggin/198049930216241
  • Paul Prudhomme makes a blackened steak steak seasoning - I have tried it but don't care for the caraway flavor on my steak. Haven't blackened steak in a while but if I would, I would use the blackened redfish seasoning. I would do the roast, season and sear heavily (that's what blackening is about), roast to 125, then tent and rest for 15 minutes. Let us know how it comes out.
  • Frank,

    Is it caraway that gives the beef (or steak) magic that odd flavor??? I thought it was curry - but I am just now taking time to learn flavors of individual spices. First time I tried it I kind of did a turn the head sideways while saying Huhhhh????? Didnt understand what that flavor was doing in a blackening spice. Not a fan. The RedFish Magic is the true flavor of blackening IMO.

    Good Sunday to you. Heading to office to clean desk, that I can take Christmas to New Years off!!!!!

    Dave
  • REALLY disagree with you on this one. Started aging beef a year or so ago (3 prime rib subprimals and one whole NY strip so far), and even wife complains when she now gets out of the meat case meat versus the aged beef. Last one went about 40 days, and it was our best so far. The difference in flavor and texture is incredible, but also a personal preference thing, so not for everyone!

    BTW, visited your blog and was VERY impressed!! Will spend some more time and look at recipes in near future. My wife would love focus on organic foods. You obviously have spent some time putting it together. Very nice :cheer: !

    Regards,

    Dave
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