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Difference between soup and stock ?

EGGARYEGGARY Posts: 1,222
edited 8:06PM in Off Topic
Was talking about Chicken Soup and was wondering about what is the difference between, lets say, Chicken Soup and Chicken Stock ? Or are they the same ?

Thanks.

Gary
Canoga Park, Ca.

Comments

  • Stock is just the liquid. It is in the soup that has other stuff in it...chicken, rice, noodles, veges,etc. In Carolina they make chicken stew. Get a bowl if anyone offers to you.
  • BBQMavenBBQMaven Posts: 1,041
    Normally stock is where you take the bones of the chicken and simmer till you cook the marrow out of the bones. You can add all kinds of ingredients for different flavors, then you strain the batch and use as the base for the soup.
    Kent Madison MS
  • what's the difference between stock and broth?
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Just west of Austintatious


  • Gary,

    A stock is made of bones and trim, with a higher ratio of bone to meat. It is simmered longer than a broth to allow the connective tissue to become gelatinous and to extract the richness of the marrow. A broth, which is a soup, uses a higher ratio of meat to bone and a shorter cooking time to allow the flavour of the meat to stay strong. You can start a broth with a stock or remouillage (which is the second use of the bones from stock) but the stock alone has a rich texture but not a lot of flavour.

    Steve

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • RRPRRP Posts: 21,914
    Steven, I'm impressed with your knowledge and am just wondering out loud how often does an electrician get to use the word remouillage? :laugh:
    L, M, S, &  Mini
    And oh yes...also a 17" BlackStone gas fired griddle! 
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
    Re- gasketing AMERICA one yard at a time!
  • Ron,

    Did I spell it wrong? :huh:

    Steve

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • RRPRRP Posts: 21,914
    no - not at all - I was just kidding - I know some electrical terms and just wondered if remouillage also refered to the remains of accident prone electricians who met their maker!
    L, M, S, &  Mini
    And oh yes...also a 17" BlackStone gas fired griddle! 
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
    Re- gasketing AMERICA one yard at a time!
  • The thing that's wrong with the French is that they don't have a word for remouillage. :laugh: :laugh:

    Paraphrase from a George W. Bush quote
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Just west of Austintatious


  • thebtlsthebtls Posts: 2,300
    Typically 'stock' contains bones and some trim. Broth, on the other hand, is usually made with pieces of actual meat, and seasonings so it tends to be richer (Obvioiusly in the case of vegetable broth, meat is not required).

    The terms stock and broth have become interchangeable over the years because they are very similar: water simmered with meat and/or bones, and usually some vegetables and aromatic herbs, then strained.

    BOTH can be used as a base for soup, stews, sauces and even gravy but there is one distinguishing characteristics between the two; broth is actually a 'finished product' and can be served on it's own.

    So, what is the practical description of how to use both? The simple answer is that if your recipe calls for broth or stock you can use either. You can also find canned or boxed broth at the grocery.
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