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Pittsburgh Eggers?

UKBradCUKBradC Posts: 46
edited 9:44PM in EggHead Forum
I was recently in Pittsburgh visiting friends and got to try a delicious steak and cheese sandwich on my first trip to Primanti Brothers. I have hated cole slaw all my life, but the cole slaw on that sandwich was delicious. Does anyone out there have a recipe or know a secret for making it that good? It was vinegar-based, not mayo, for those who haven’t been there. I know I could never live up to the original, but I’d like to try and make a BGE version of this sandwich.

Comments

  • Old SaltOld Salt Posts: 28
    Bradlee,

    found this link, hope it helps http://projects.washingtonpost.com/recipes/2009/01/28/primanti-bros-sandwiches/

    My favorite is the pastrami and swiss. Primanti's is the perfect place to go after a night on the town, a concert or a hockey game. Just make sure that the fries are smoking hot and the slaw is ice cold.

    Pat
  • reccitronreccitron Posts: 176
    My favorite is the corned beef dipped in hot sauce. Below is another link that I've had bookmarked for a while but haven't needed to try yet so I don't know how good they are.

    Even though I don't live in the burgh any more, there is a place near me that makes Primanti style sandwiches that are very close to the original. Of course there is nothing like getting one in the strip district.



    http://www.milspouse.com/primanti-bros-sandwich.aspx
  • PattyOPattyO Posts: 883
    I think the secret is how thin the caggabe is shaved. We can't duplicate that with a kitchen knife, not even a mandolin. They use the slicer. The dressing is vinegar, sugar and a little oil. No herbs, plain.
    PattyO
  • reccitronreccitron Posts: 176
    PattyO wrote:
    I think the secret is how thin the caggabe is shaved. We can't duplicate that with a kitchen knife, not even a mandolin. They use the slicer. The dressing is vinegar, sugar and a little oil. No herbs, plain.
    PattyO

    I've never noticed the thickness of the cabbage. I'm anxious to check that out the next time I'm there.
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