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dough with food processor, thoughts?

Roll TideRoll Tide Posts: 505
edited 12:52PM in EggHead Forum
anyone use a food processor to make pizza dough? I know thy I will have to be careful not to get the dough too hot. I don't currently have a mixer, its on the ever expanding to-buy list, so just wondering if anyones tried this and your thoughts. My food processor has a dough attachment, btw

Comments

  • HossHoss Posts: 14,600
    Give it a WHIRL!!!You ain't got much to lose! ;) :laugh:
  • Roll TideRoll Tide Posts: 505
    that's a very good point... lol
  • WingRiderWingRider Posts: 326
    I assume that you do not have a bread machine?
  • Trey the"no-knead" pizza dough. I've done it several times with great results. It take a few minutes to mix, then rests for two hours and your ready for two pies from the normal recipe. Dave
  • I assumed you wanted pizza. Otherwise try the "no-knead" breads. Dave
  • PattyOPattyO Posts: 883
    I won't use anything other than the Kitchen Aid dough hook or knead the old fashioned way, by hand. Kneading is stretching and slapping to get those gluten strands long. The food processor cuts them. That's good for pastry dough. And yes, you have to be careful of the friction heat you are creating. Put that KA on top of your wish list.
    PattyO
  • 70chevelle70chevelle Posts: 278
    I've gone thru a progression. I did start out using my Cuisenart with the dough blade and the dough setting. (Then I went to my wifes Kitchenaid until I bought my Electrolux Assistent) It worked fine, and you are correct about not getting the dough too hot or working it too much. If it's what you have, definitely use it. Here's what I would do if I were you. Put all your wet ingredients in the bowl. Add 75% of your flour and quickly incorporate it. Let it rest (absorbing the water) for 20 minutes, minimum. After that, add the rest of your flour and dry ingredients and incorporate. Once the dough comes together, dump it on the counter and give it a few stretch & folds. Seperate into balls and put in the fridge for a day or 2. Good Luck!
  • Roll TideRoll Tide Posts: 505
    No, I don't have a bread machine, either.
  • Roll TideRoll Tide Posts: 505
    I've found a couple no knead recipes that I've thought about trying. Thanks
  • Roll TideRoll Tide Posts: 505
    PattyO, Thanks for the comment. I hve been browsing some online and in the store the past couple days. I may have to invest in one.
  • Roll TideRoll Tide Posts: 505
    70Chevelle,
    Thats kind of what I would like to do. I would like to make some breads, doughs, etc... with what I have now if I could and eventually updgrade. Kind of like I did with my egg. I had other cookers, learned the ropes and moved up the best grill/smoker in the world. Thanks for your comments. Can you describe how the dough made in the processor compared to the dough made in the mixer?
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 22,739
    ive never tried it with pizza dough, does it matter if you make it way ahead of time like they recommend, im thinking it doesnt make alot of difference if you make it ahead of time, worth trying anyways
  • tach18ktach18k Posts: 1,607
    I use it to do mine, be sure to use the dough blade, also I have been using Bobby Flays pizza dough I got online some where, works very well with the FP.
  • AngelaAngela Posts: 543
    All the time. I own a stand mixer too but for small batches of dough the food processor is faster at kneading.
    Egging on two larges + 36" Blackstone griddle
  • Boilermaker BenBoilermaker Ben Posts: 1,956
    There's an Italian cooking show on PBS called Lidia's Italy. The host routinely uses her food processor to make dough. I'm not sure if she uses it for pizza dough, but I know I've seen her make focaccia and other breads with it.
    If it's good enough for an Italian...

    Then again, people had been making bread for at least a year or two before bread makers, mixers and food processors were invented, so...what's wrong with a little kneading?
  • I recommend "the best bread ever" by Charles Van Over. His work goes into great detail on using a food processor for bread. you van make artisan class breads with a food processor.
    There are two caveats. The batch size is limited but larger then most bread machines and there is considerable wear and tear on the plastic parts of the work bowl and blades.
    TTFN WLL
  • 70chevelle70chevelle Posts: 278
    Roll Tide wrote:
    70Chevelle,
    Thats kind of what I would like to do. I would like to make some breads, doughs, etc... with what I have now if I could and eventually updgrade. Kind of like I did with my egg. I had other cookers, learned the ropes and moved up the best grill/smoker in the world. Thanks for your comments. Can you describe how the dough made in the processor compared to the dough made in the mixer?

    Thats kind of what I would like to do. I would like to make some breads, doughs, etc... with what I have now if I could and eventually updgrade. Kind of like I did with my egg. I had other cookers, learned the ropes and moved up the best grill/smoker in the world. Thanks for your comments. Can you describe how the dough made in the processor compared to the dough made in the mixer?[/quote]

    The dough I make in my Electrolux Assistent is better, because that's it's purpose. I'm sure I could get an attachment for it to be a food processor, but the Cuisenart would still be better. Make sense? That being said, making dough is more about measuring, patience and getting experience to know when the dough is ready for it's next step. If you follow the steps I laid out, have a good scale to measure your ingredients (repeatable, consistent results), you will be able to make excellent dough with a food processor. The long counter rise or a day or two in the fridge helps with fermentation and gives great flavor to the dough. There's definitely a lot to it, and you have to experiment to see what you like best. When I started I was using Robin Hood Pizza dough in a packet, just add water :woohoo: I thought it was good then. :ermm:

    Good Luck!

    Here's a good place to start for pizza dough in bakers percentage so you can make any amount you like.

    100% Flour (A good bread flour or All Purpose)
    65% Water (room temp: not hot or cold)
    1%-2% Salt
    1% Olive oil
    .5% IDY

    When you done kneading, the dough should not look lumpy, it should be smooth. If you have an IR thermometer, it should be in the high 70's. (Too low a temp the yeast won't activate, too high and you'll kill it) Separate into 300g dough balls and put in ziplock containers in the fridge for 24 (+-) hours. Take out about 2 hours before you plan on shaping. If you make too much dough, put the extra dough balls in plastic sandwich bags, squeeze out the air and use a twisty tie. Take out the day your ready to use and let them rise in a covered ziplock container on the counter all day.
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