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Asian Carp

ArvadaManArvadaMan Posts: 202
edited 9:13PM in EggHead Forum
I was traveling this month and came across an article in an airline magazine about a chef who was eating the invasive jumping Asian Carp that have been causing problems in the US. I was intrigued by the article and was wondering if anyone on the egghead forum has egged and or eaten one of these? If so, what do you think?

Here is the article:

http://www.hemispheresmagazine.com/2010/05/01/one-giant-leap/

Comments

  • KokemanKokeman Posts: 816
    The only thing I have heard good about them is shooting them as they jump behind the boats.
  • misfitmisfit Posts: 358
    C'mon down here, we got a problem with leaping sturgeon. Several people have died by that. What do you put on the headstone, "He Was Whacked By A Fish"???
  • Capt FrankCapt Frank Posts: 2,578
    Carp, Asian or otherwise, is real low on the foodchain. They are bottom feeders, which means they absorb all the contaminents in the river bed. Would you want to eat something that has lived its whole life in the Chicago Sanitary Canal? :sick: ?

    Capt Frank
    Homosassa, FL
  • Capt FrankCapt Frank Posts: 2,578
    Carp, Asian or otherwise, is real low on the foodchain. They are bottom feeders, which means they absorb all the contaminents in the river bed. Would you want to eat something that has lived its whole life in the Chicago Sanitary Canal? :sick: ?

    Capt Frank
    Homosassa, FL
  • ArvadaManArvadaMan Posts: 202
    My understanding is that it is not a bottom feeder but feeds on algae. I heard it is not related to common carp.
  • Capt FrankCapt Frank Posts: 2,578
    You may be right, I don't know, but I do know that the state of Michigan is trying to close the Chicago Sanitary Canal temporarily so they can be eradicated before they get into Lake Michigan. Many algaes feed on pollutants that we have dumped in our waterways, so we are back to square one. There are hundreds of species of fish that are both safe to eat and good, why risk eating something that is neither? B)

    Capt Frank
    Homosassa, FL
  • Bulldog MomBulldog Mom Posts: 242
    I just a story on the Today Show this morning, where a executive chef is working on several dishes. I would like to egg some but not sure where to by it.
  • ArvadaManArvadaMan Posts: 202
    I suppose so. I was just curious it anyone had since I read the article.
  • RRPRRP Posts: 20,245
    Judi - we live near the Illinois River where those god-for-shaken fish are problematic to boaters and skiers - they are spooked by sound and literally jump out of the water. After you have been hit by one of the slimy, bloody things I can't imagine wanting to eat one!
    L, M, S, Mini
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
  • I read the same article. Good idea I thought. One thing that humans have shown over and over again, once they get a taste for something, they will kill the hell out of it.

    Bottom feeders? True enough, but so is lobster.

    Anyway, the fish you need to be worried about are the ones that EAT the bottom feeders. Bioaccumulation and bioconcentration can result in fish unacceptably high in contaminants. That's why it's usually a good idea to eat fish at the bottom of the food chain. By definition, this fish (even if fished to extirpation) could be considered sustainable. Clever

    Pollock used to be considered 'inedible' as well.

    I like when people think outside the box.
  • I grew up on the St. Lawrence River near where the borders of New York State, Ontario and Quebec converge. There is now a local motel in the area that brings in anglers from the UK who pay big bucks to fish for carp in the river but they just land them, take a picture and release. Years back there used to be a lot of bow anglers who went after carp.

    When I was a kid you could get a few bucks if you hooked a carp and there was an Asian fisherman nearby who would buy it off you. I assumed they ate them and in fact I ate a carp-like fish in a restaurant in Vancouver which wasn't bad but never tried eating the carp at home as the perch, pickerel and mudpout (small catfish) were tastier and not as bony.

    Rob
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