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Spark danger

JasonATIJasonATI Posts: 62
edited 7:22AM in EggHead Forum
If I have the egg on a slow cook can I bring it into the garage to avoid winds and rain.

Comments

  • Carolina QCarolina Q Posts: 12,578
    Why? It doesn't care about the weather. Plus, you'll smoke up your garage.

    I hate it when I go to the kitchen for food and all I find are ingredients!

                                                                …Unknown

    Michael 
    Central Connecticut 

  • Winds and rain won't really affect the egg on a slow cook. Turn the the egg so that the lower vent is away from the wind. As for you, well then you need to just pull it close to the garage where you can seen the temp probe. If you are using the dome temp as a guide, twist it so that the temp you are trying to maintain is at the 12 o'clock position, then you can usually see it easier to tell if it is at the correct temp without actually having to see they numbers themselves.
  • One more thing.......if you are worried about getting in the rain to open the egg then you are breaking a rule already. NEVER open the lid on a low and slow if you can help it......at least not unless you are doing it to rotate the cook or sauce something. :P
  • Celtic WolfCeltic Wolf Posts: 9,773
    Sure you can do it... However, you will not live long enough to enjoy what were cooking..

    This is a charcoal fired device. CARBON MONOXIDE KILLS

    Leave it outside, as others have said weather won't bother it..
  • thirdeyethirdeye Posts: 7,428
    DSC08238a.jpg

    DSC08241a.jpg

    Last summer, I was in the final stages of a Chinese meal on the Egg, cooking in what I thought was a regular rainstorm. Well it turned out to be a flash flood, and we got about 3" of rain in 30 minutes.

    Here is a picture out my front door of my flagpole with old glory barely hanging on.

    DSC08239.jpg


    Oh yeah, the cook? Well it turned out fine.

    DSC08246a.jpg
    Happy Trails
    ~thirdeye~

    Barbecue is not rocket surgery
  • wind and rain won't affect a slo cook.

    hell, a blizzard won't.
    no worries

    your worry wouldn't be sparks, but carbon monoxid, anyway. don't screw around. keep it outside. it'll be fine
  • JasonATIJasonATI Posts: 62
    I should have been more specific, its a triple garage and I would have it in the center of the double stall with the door open. I was concered about the wireless temp sender and also the unsealed sides of the boards.
  • No worries on the wood, it will dry. Slip a zip-lock bag over the sending unit and leave it opened.
  • EggzellentEggzellent Posts: 238
    Celtic Wolf wrote:
    Sure you can do it... However, you will not live long enough to enjoy what were cooking..

    This is a charcoal fired device. CARBON MONOXIDE KILLS

    Leave it outside, as others have said weather won't bother it..


    "...I should have been more specific, its a triple garage and I would have it in the center of the
    double stall with the door open.
    I was concered about the wireless temp sender and also the
    unsealed sides of the boards..."


    Unless this triple garage is unattached to the house and nobody plans on going in it for a while...I'd heed the advice given above. Regretfully putting aside your original concern expressed in the topic heading...and if the smoke smell doesn't stink up the place...you may not have to worry about it anyways.
    (as Celtic Wolf pointed out).

    It's interesting to me how many of you are able to even cook so close to your homes on a regular basis and in ever changing wind conditions. Our house is anything but 'tight' (we like it that way) yet our very first cook permanently placed our XL BGE maybe 35 foot from it (on the concrete) for weed burner starts and the same fresh air in the house.

    Then again, I realize that a lot of these newer and larger houses have supposedly 'airtight' construction (with triple garages seemingly the 'norm' nowadays)...yet I simply wouldn't trust the concept for what my opinion is worth.

    Good luck! ;)
  • JasonATIJasonATI Posts: 62
    Once you have it up to temp do any sparks come out of the top daisy wheel? I usually pull the table out into the driveway.
  • 'Q Bruddah'Q Bruddah Posts: 739
    Up to temp there may not be a lot of sparks. What the previous posters are trying to communicate is that it is a vessel containing fire that may spark but an even greater danger is Carbon Monoxide, colorless odorless and deadly.
  • i started my car in the basement garage (door to the house is gasketed and was shut behind me, grage door open) and backed out into the driveway. three or four minutes later the carbon monoxide detector went off on the second floor of my house.

    there is no reasonable way to safely bring a lit charcoal grill inside, even your garage, with the door open, especially if there's another option.

    if you'd asked first about how to protect the wireless transmitter, we'd be able to answer that. always ask the REAL question. :)

    put it in a tupperware container or ziploc, put an umbrella on a stand over the egg (my set up), etc.

    please don't risk it. i am pretty loose and fast with food safety (dry aging at home, cooking food to lower temps than the feds say.. etc.), but i cannot think of a single legitimate reason or way to roll a charcoal grill into a structure. especially if it's just to protect the wireless transmitter
  • and though there is a CHANCE of a spark, crbon monoxide is an absolute certainty.

    it's why i can';t help but mock people afraid of fumes from the egg (like galvy bolts or silicone adhesive). they already have the most dangerous type of fume possible coming from their egg, and it happens every single time they fire up.

    we fear what we can see, and often ignore far greater risks because we don't understand them.

    someone who drives because they fear flying, for example. they aren't rational. they're just not very good at math. :silly:
  • 'Q Bruddah'Q Bruddah Posts: 739
    Well, said. Nearly every winter in Seattle, where the weather is fairly mild, people die trying to heat their homes with a charcoal grill. Many times they are immigrants from tropical climates not used to the cold and just trying to stay warm. They were uninformed but still dead.
  • JasonATIJasonATI Posts: 62
    stripstike wrote:
    if you'd asked first about how to protect the wireless transmitter, we'd be able to answer that. always ask the REAL question. :)

    I've used my Weber gas grill in the garage before but I knew that it would not throw sparks, the egg concerned me. The CO detector in the house never came off zero so it must have drafted out.
    Its probably my type A personality that gets worried about the table getting wet, possible rust on egg parts and the wireless transmitter getting wet.

    Thirdeye, if I saw rain like that i'd put a lifevest on my egg. :) Thanks everyone.
  • ledmondledmond Posts: 88
    Remember just 3-4 yrs. ago one of the "Boston" band members put a charcoal grille in his bathroom and killed himself (on purpose), so even if you are careful, it can be deadly.
  • Celtic WolfCeltic Wolf Posts: 9,773
    Propane and natural gas produce Carbon Dioxide and no where the levels of Carbon Monoxide that charcoal produces.

    Read the side of the charcoal bag.. They ALL say WELL Ventilated..


    Now if you are a fan of spending 4+ hours inside a glass tube not much bigger than you breathing pure oxygen under pressure go ahead and be stupid..
  • Carolina QCarolina Q Posts: 12,578
    JasonATI wrote:
    Its probably my type A personality that gets worried about the table getting wet, possible rust on egg parts and the wireless transmitter getting wet.

    So, you worry about "stuff", but CO doesn't bother you? Okay, bud... Good luck.

    I hate it when I go to the kitchen for food and all I find are ingredients!

                                                                …Unknown

    Michael 
    Central Connecticut 

  • JasonATIJasonATI Posts: 62
    Carolina Q wrote:
    So, you worry about "stuff", but CO doesn't bother you? Okay, bud... Good luck.

    The CO was not a concern because it says use in a well ventilated area, I thought that a garage door 16'x8' opened would be considered "well ventilated" but I will not use it in the garage.

    Thanks again.
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