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Egging using Pyrex dishs?

RicklesssRicklesss Posts: 391
edited 11:17AM in EggHead Forum
So I think I know you CAN use it. (I think)
But I think I know, too, that it soot's up and in general get's fairly dirty.
Does it pretty much ruin the dish? Or is it fairly easily cleaned up?
Thinking things like bread pans, and lasagna, and casserole dish's...
If temps are kept reasonable (under 400?) they won't crack will they?
Or do I have to "preheat" them first?
Sorry for all the questions! :blush:

Comments

  • Carolina QCarolina Q Posts: 12,300
    I have only baked brownies in my Pyrex, but had no problem at all. 350* dome, indirect, placed cold Pyrex in hot egg. Best brownies ever, btw.

    EDIT: No cleanup issues either. Same as in any oven.

    I hate it when I go to the kitchen for food and all I find are ingredients!

                                                                …Unknown

    Michael 
    Central Connecticut 

  • cookn bikercookn biker Posts: 13,407
    From scratch or box?
    Molly
    Colorado Springs
    "Loney Queen"
    "Respect your fellow human being, treat them fairly, disagree with them honestly, enjoy their friendship, explore your thoughts about one another candidly, work together for a common goal and help one another achieve it."
    Bill Bradley; American hall of fame basketball player, Rhodes scholar, former U.S. Senator from New Jersey
    LBGE, MBGE, SBGE , MiniBGE and a Mini Mini BGE
  • Carolina QCarolina Q Posts: 12,300
    hahaha. box of course.

    Rick, I just looked at the Pyrex web site and they say...

    PYREX GLASS BAKEWARE SAFETY AND USAGE INSTRUCTIONS:

    NEVER use on top of the stove, under a broiler, in a toaster oven, or place over oven vent or pilot light.
    AVOID severe hot to cold temperature changes, including:
    DO NOT add liquid to hot dish
    DO NOT place hot dish or glass cover in sink
    DO NOT immerse hot dish in water
    DO NOT place hot dish on cold or wet surfaces
    Handle hot ovenware and glass covers with dry potholders
    ALWAYS add a small amount of liquid to the vessel prior to baking foods that release liquids while cooking.
    DO NOT overheat oil or butter in microwave. Use minimum amount of cooking time.
    DO NOT use or repair any item that is chipped, cracked or scratched.

    I haven't had a problem going from ambient to 350 though.

    I hate it when I go to the kitchen for food and all I find are ingredients!

                                                                …Unknown

    Michael 
    Central Connecticut 

  •  
    Hi Rickless,

    Pyrex is fine on the egg, use it just like you would in your regular oven. I would think twice before using it at extreme temperatures that exceed that of a regular oven which it was designed for. It will not ruin the dish or soot it or do much of anything your oven wouldn't.
    The Pyrex name was sold by Corning in 1998 and the glass has been changed. It is no longer a borosilicate but a tempered soda lime glass that may not with stand thermal shock as well as the original. I have heard of the soda lime glass shattering when exposed to heat more frequently then the old glass. The new Pyrex has never been made in Corning, New York so if you have some that says that it was made in Corning NY then you know it is the older glass. Many of the older pieces may not say Corning NY but will look their age.

    Pyrex_Small.jpg

    I search the thrift stores for Pyrex, you can find great bargains on some great pieces of the original. This loaf pan I picked up for $3, it is huge and perfect for meat loafs.

    MeatLoaf_640_001.jpg

    After the cook it is no messier then if it had been cooked in a regular oven and was never exposed to temperatures or conditions that would not be found in normal use.
    MeatLoaf_640_002.jpg
    It cleaned up with no problems, I may have let it soak in hot soapy water for a while and I'm sure I used a 3M scrub pad on it (3M makes a white scrub pad as well as a green, the white is for more delicate surfaces and you can get pretty aggressive with it and not scratch the glass. I'm not sure the green would hurt Pyrex but why chance it.) The pan was no problem and as I recall only had a couple small spots that needed any scrubbing.

    Gator

     
  • Carolina QCarolina Q Posts: 12,300
    Interesting. I just looked at several of my Pyrex pieces. A couple are only 2-3 years old, but several date back to the 70s (remember avocado green? :)). All say Made in USA, but NONE say Corning NY.

    I hate it when I go to the kitchen for food and all I find are ingredients!

                                                                …Unknown

    Michael 
    Central Connecticut 

  • RicklesssRicklesss Posts: 391
    Great! Thank you everybody!
    I will do it!
    Thanks for the great tip about Corning changing glass compounds.
    I was assuming they got pretty darn nasty looking because of a couple recent posts here on the forum that mentioned an enameled D.O. getting pretty yukky, and another thread mentioning where one of those old (bright) white classic type casserole dish's getting blackened.
    Appreciate it! :)
  •  
    I have never been able to figure which pieces got marked Corning NY and which ones didn't. I wish there was a failsafe method of telling its age. There are web sights dedicated to the "vintage" Pyrex and tons of it are sold on flea bay. I don't know what patterns the newer stuff has been made in but I am sure there are older patterns that were only made of the original glass, your avocado green may be one of them. You at least know that it dates back to the 70's prior to the sale of the name. I have some that belonged to my mother and grandmother that are old enough just because I know who owned them. If I see a piece in a thrift store that has a good deal of wear on the bottom from being slid in and out of an oven then I can often guess if it is older then 1998. The newer glass can also be very clear and transparent where older pieces can have a amber or yellowish tint to the glass. It can be very difficult telling the old from the new at times.

    Gator
  • AngelaAngela Posts: 543
    yep, I wouldn't do it with new glass. All my pyrex dishes are prior to the change though, but I still don't use them. I prefer cast iron. I love my cast iron loaf pans.
    Egging on two larges + 36" Blackstone griddle
  • the new pyrex is suitable for oven use, it just does NOT have any thermal shock value. as you mentioned, borosilicate is one thing. pyrex these days is nothing more than tempered glass. old pyrex is actually more of a clear ceramic. like a "glass" stove top
  • AZRPAZRP Posts: 10,116
    I make enchiladas in a Pyrex dish with no problems, cleans up well. -RP
  • Carolina QCarolina Q Posts: 12,300
    Yep. My 2-3 year old stuff always goes from room temp into a preheated oven, whether in the kitchen or on the egg. Have put them into ovens as hot as 425*, as with last night's potatoes for instance. No issues at all.

    I hate it when I go to the kitchen for food and all I find are ingredients!

                                                                …Unknown

    Michael 
    Central Connecticut 

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