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How to Cook My Goose....?

RiverFarmRiverFarm Posts: 216
edited 7:34AM in EggHead Forum
I have a five and a half pound domestic goose that I wanted to try cooking in the Egg tonight. Any ideas or suggestions? These can be on the chewy side so I was hoping that the Egg would help tenderize it.

Comments

  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 5,463
    IMG]http://i53.photobucket.com/albums/g57/gdenby/ChrsmsGoos.jpg[/IMG]

    A shot of the goose I did 2 years ago for Christmas. Note that the skin is scored all over. This allowed the large quantity of fat geese usually have to run into the drip pan, and so the skin was very nice and crispy. Placed a few lemon wedges inside to improve moisture, add flavor. If I recall correctly, the outside was just well coated with salt and pepper, maybe a little ginger.

    Started it with a rather hot dome temp, about 400, but lowered it after the first 15 min to 350.

    Used pecan shells for smoke. The smoke flavor was mild, and so the rendered fat was usable for frying, altho not as good as the excess fat that I rendered seperately.
  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 5,463
    ChrsmsGoos.jpg

    grr...
  • gdenby, yeah, you had bracket issues with that picture. Wow, that looks gorgeous! Ours are home-raised geese so they're not very fat; they spent a lot of time free-ranging. So I was wondering whether Egging one would improve its tenderness and how to achieve that. I have some lemon I can use for the interior.

    Was this a commercial or a wild goose?
  • And I forgot to ask, how long did you cook it?
  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 5,463
    It was commercial, and pretty fatty. The problem I've had with geese is getting the large amount of fat out of the flesh, and the scoring really helped. If yours is not so fatty, perhaps not scoring it might be good. Just a few knife pricks where the fat is thick.

    Alternatively, if it is really thin, insert some herbed butter under the skin. I have trouble imagining a goose that really is thin, tho. Also, bring does help birds from being dry, but you would need to do that overnight.

    I don't recall the time exactly. I think it was about 4 hours, but I'm not sure. Cooked to 165 in the breast.

    Good luck.
  • A couple of weeks ago, I went out with the boys on Friday night. Didn't get home until late Saturday night.
    Let me tell ya, when I got home, my Goose was Cooked! :S :unsure: :blink: :pinch:
  • This is a fairly lean goose. Not as lean as our geese used to be, but I'm hoping I get some fat and I'm not sure I will. I don't think I'll need the butter, though.

    How big was yours?

    The internal temperature is helpful. Thanks again!
  • Tim, You seem to STAY in trouble!!!! :woohoo: :woohoo: :woohoo:

    Good luck on the job interview - hope to meet you in Plano!
  • I think my goose was just hijacked....
  • I didn't even HONK during the hijacking ! :laugh:
  • And I still don't have a criminal record! :lol:
    I hope to make Plano but it's not looking good, my second interview might be moving to Friday. If I don't make it, I'll call the Legion on Saturday to say hi.
  • HossHoss Posts: 14,600
    You got a grinder??? ;)
  • Well, I cooked my goose. I started a little hotter, at about 350°, but dropped the egg to about 300°. The goose was trussed with some lemon and onion chunks and some rosemary in the cavity. About an hour in I added potatoes to the pan on the plate setter; by then there was some nice goose fat to cook it in. It was done after two hours but my husband came in from his deerstand with the news that he had bagged a doe with his bow, so dinner had to be put off a bit. The goose and potatoes were still very tasty, but some of the meat was chewy. I'm not sure what to do about that!
  • mkcmkc Posts: 540
    A little late for the goose in question, but...

    One thought (especially since you're dealing with lean birds) would be to brine it overnight like you do a turkey. That generally helps with moisture retention.

    Another idea, which I use to reduce the gameyness of lamb and which also tenderizes because of the acidity is an overnight buttermilk soak. That's a lot of buttermilk, though, probably more than you want to purchase and later pour down the sink. I do like this method for lamb shanks, though. I'll add salt to the buttermilk as well.
    Egging in Denton, Texas
  • Hi, Michelle. I do use dry-brining a lot, although I'm not sure if I dry-brined this bird; probably not because I would have labelled it then. But it was juicy enough; it was just a bit tough. Maybe marinating it in something would have helped to break down those fibers. You're right, that would be an awful lot of buttermilk. But a wine or vinegar marinade might do the same thing at less expense and waste. Crockpotting them helps, too, and I did try cooking this one at a lower temperature than most people suggested - 300° rather than 400. Maybe even lower and slower would have helped. I guess I don't know as much about the science of cooking meat as I should.

    We still have several more geese in the freezer, and at least one is an adult, not a young one. So I'll have to go back to the drawing board. Maybe the Egg isn't the answer... could that be??!

    By the way, I wanted to ask you what kind of yeast you use for your bread-making. I started off using the Red Star that you can buy in quantity from King Arthur, but when I ran out I checked out some other sources and noticed on Amazon that someone said Fleischman's brand didn't have the same strong, yeasty taste that Red Star lent its products. So I bought some. I haven't noticed any yeasty or sour flavor, but then I've also been using white whole wheat flour instead of the regular kind.

    Leslie
  • mkcmkc Posts: 540
    RiverRat wrote:

    By the way, I wanted to ask you what kind of yeast you use for your bread-making. I started off using the Red Star that you can buy in quantity from King Arthur, but when I ran out I checked out some other sources and noticed on Amazon that someone said Fleischman's brand didn't have the same strong, yeasty taste that Red Star lent its products. So I bought some. I haven't noticed any yeasty or sour flavor, but then I've also been using white whole wheat flour instead of the regular kind.

    Leslie

    Hi Leslie,

    I use SAF Instant which I buy in 1 pound bulk from www.pennmac.com. King Arthur may sell it as well (their site is having problems so I can't check). It's made by the same folks as Red Star, but it's a fine-grained instant dry yeast. I've found it a very reliable, long-lived yeast (I also keep it in an airtight container in the freezer). I don't notice an overly-yeasty flavor, either. Some grocers and specialty stores carry it in packets, too. I think I originally found it at Williams-Sonoma (20 years ago, though).

    I don't care for Fleischman's since I've had inconsistent results with it over the years.

    Since whole grain flours go bad quickly (the oils in the germ oxidize and go rancid), I keep my flour in the freezer. I definitely noticed a flavor improvement after I started doing this.

    With the geese, I would guess it's like any animal protein - the older it is, the tougher and drier the meat is. That means the low and slow, wet methods of cooking like stewing and braising will work better. Those older birds will have more flavor, though. You could always try duplicating the crockpot method in the Egg by using a dutch oven to braise the bird. I also wonder if larding the meat would help - and doesn't bacon make everything better? B)
    Egging in Denton, Texas
  • Michelle, I use SAF Instant too; I called it Red Star because they make it. I bought my first lot from King Arthur, and I keep both that and my flours in the freezer, except for some unbleached white which is in a canister on my counter. Interesting that you've had inconsistent results with Fleischman's; so far it's working well for me but I haven't had it long.

    I think braising is the key to tender goose. I have looked all over for French country recipes for goose because they would have used older barnyard critters, but all I've found are recipes involving goose parts. When I roast a goose I like to make rillettes with the carcass, but I still need to figure out how best to cook the entire bird. Again, I'm not sure larding would do the trick since it was juicy enough - just a bit too chewy.

    I checked out the European Peasant Bread you mentioned and it looks good except that it's mostly white flour. My husband and I are trying to find a recipe we both like. I prefer whole grains, like the 100% whole wheat and the whole wheat sandwich bread, and he really likes the semolina. I'm thinking about trying the peasant bread and substituting white whole wheat for some of the regular white. I also use vital wheat gluten when I'm baking bread with whole grains; I don't know if that really makes a difference in loft but it's supposed to.

    Leslie
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