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bathroom wall tile question

RRPRRP Posts: 19,332
edited 11:50PM in Off Topic
we are soon to begin a major renovation of our bathrooms. While the work will be done professionally I am doing certain prep work myself as will I do the painting. the walls are presently drywall covered with vinyl backed wallpaper. I've already removed the wallpaper with ease and now am using Zinser product DIF to remove the glue residue. Nearly half of the remodeled walls will have floor to ceiling ceramic tiles which includes showers and bath tub. My question is will the wall tile be installed on a waterproof backer board which would be placed over the existing drywall or not? In other words do I really need to take the time and effort to clean the glue residue off as it is making such a mess!
L, M, S, Mini
Ron
Dunlap, IL

Comments

  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    they would probably prefer you take the drywall off, down to the studs. the drywall isn't required as back-up, and can cause more trouble than it's worth with the added thickness (window/door trim and jambs).

    who is doing the actual design and plan?

    make these decisions in advance, or the GC will make them for you.
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • "Sparky""Sparky" Posts: 6,024
    Hey Ron,if you're gonna cover that much in tile,I would specify that they use a concrete backer board.They would use it anyway in the shower,but the other walls(if you want to keep them even(flush)will also need the backer board.If you're only tiling up to say(blah,blah")in the rest of the room,you'll just have to prep the drywall above that point.I hope that makes sence to ya man :pinch: I can speak better than I can type(sometimes) :whistle:
  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    i have a chair rail in the bathroom (yep, just the one).

    taken down to studs, we have new drywall above ( GWB ) and backer board below, flush. the tile runs up and just over the joint. Otherwise the chair rail cap would not sit flush, or there'd be a gap the thickness of the backerboard if it sat on top of the drywall.
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • tach18ktach18k Posts: 1,607
    On several of my bath remodels, I always take the wall down to the studs. I can then take pictures of wiring and other things. Also it gives you room to replace other things like plugged drain lines and other assorted hidden stuff. I use the backer board in all areas where any water will be present, that includes the tile on the counter and back splash. Matching backer boards and Green drywall is not a big deal, done right and no one will notice. Take pictures! I did a kitchen remodel and forgot how I did the wiring for some lighting, sure came in handy.
  • I am with Doug, If you are going through the expense to do it in the first place do it right. The Hardy board(concrete backer board) will be much more durable to bond the tiles to the wall than just sheet rock. Hardy Board is still somewhat cheap and would save a lot of time and effort preping sheet rock walls. If it were my house I would use the Hardy Board. We just finished a total house re model and in the bath rooms I used the Green Board(moisture resistant sheet rock) and the Hardy board. It will be there a long long time. :)
  • FlaPoolmanFlaPoolman Posts: 11,670
    Ron just rip the old drywall out and install grayboard or the fiberglass board. I just completely redid mine including having to replace the studs. Not a bad idea to do the plumbing while your in there. Call me if you need any help.
  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 28,169
    Ron,

    What Sparky said. If you keep any of the old board poke it witha screwdriver and if it isn't soft anywhere, spray it with tea tree oil (it stinks) and then cover it with Kilz.

    Steve

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • CarbonizerCarbonizer Posts: 188
    Ron: Don't know how old everything there is, but if you have a two handle tub/shower valve it doesn't meet Illinois code anymore. Need to change to a single handle pressure-balanced valve. They can pop you if your were to sell the home. They work and look better too. Also might be a good time to replace the piping if its galvanized steel. Use type L copper. Doing either would be easiest with all the drywall removed.

    Bob
  • CarbonizerCarbonizer Posts: 188
    Ron: Should have mentioned that some single handle tub/shower valves are not pressure-balanced and do not meet code either. If you want, e-mail me a picture of the face-plate and handle to my house e-mail and I should be able to tell.


    Bob
  • RRPRRP Posts: 19,332
    Thanks to all of you for your responses - I appreciate your input, insight and for the offers to help!
    L, M, S, Mini
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
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