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Drawing of bolts raising grate

Peter CreaseyPeter Creasey Posts: 253
edited 8:24PM in EggHead Forum
I have misplaced the architectural-type drawing that someone provided here that displays how carriage bolts are installed to raise the grate ~1/8 - 1/4 inch.

Can someone please provide it here, please.

Thanks!

Comments

  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    was flashback bob. might do a search for his posts...
    maybe he'll see your post, too
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • RJH10RJH10 Posts: 10
    Peter,,,I have a pic/diagram of it ,,, whats you e-mail addy and I will try to send ,,, Randall...
  • RJH10 wrote:
    Peter,,,I have a pic/diagram of it ,,, whats you e-mail addy and I will try to send ,,,

    Randall, Thanks!

    I have sent you an email with my email address.
  • RJH10RJH10 Posts: 10
    I sent it to you Pete ,,let me know if that is what you were looking for.. Randall...
  • RJH10 wrote:
    I sent it to you Pete ,,let me know if that is what you were looking for...

    Randall, Thanks! I received what you sent in good shape.

    What you sent is helpful but is not really the diagram I was trying to recover. Yours shows how to raise the grid. I want the diagram that shows how to raise the grate.

    The diagram I was trying to recover is fairly large and shows the interior of the BGE and how the air flows through the raised grate in the firebox. It was drawn by hand but in a very professional, architectural-type style.
  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    viz.?

    Markkal123firegrate.jpg

    i wouldn't call it "professional", hahaha

    this one was mine. i thought you wanted bob's diagram on how the bolts were attached
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • stike wrote:
    this one was mine.

    S, Yes, I believe that is the one I was wanting.

    Thanks!
  • reelgemreelgem Posts: 4,256
    I'm curious as to why you would want to raise the grate? It's obvious with a grid but a grate??
  • reelgem wrote:
    I'm curious as to why you would want to raise the grate? It's obvious with a grid but a grate??

    Anne, Look at the additional air flow you get. This is desirable.
  • FidelFidel Posts: 10,172
    The thought is to increase air flow by raising the edges of the grate 1/4" or so above the firebox. It also allows ash to fall around the edges of the grate. The increase is somewhat limited because you plug 3 of the holes in the firegrate with the bolts.

    I tried it and noticed absolutely no difference in performance, lump use, speed to temps, etc. The only thing it did for me was make it more difficult to clean the ash and more difficult to use my wiggle rod - the bolts are in the way.
  • Peter, there was another drawing or picture that raised the fire grate as well, but did not clog up 3 air holes, and did not have 3 legs that get in the way of the ash tool. It used short bolts and washers to do this. Personally, I took a piece of expanded metal, cut an 11 inch circle (for a large egg) and use that as a fire grate. Air flow is superb, I no longer need a wiggle rod. I thought it would burn up quick, but I have been using it for well over a year and it still looks like it did when I threw it in the egg.
  • DryFlyDryFly Posts: 351
    Fidel is on the money. I did the same to my Small and it works. I used shorter stainless steel bolts that when inserted into the outer ring of holes caught the lower part of the firebox and did not extend to the floor of the Egg as depicted in the drawing. It raised the grate 1/4" and resulted in much more air and easier to control. More responsive. As I said this is in a small. I don't know if the configuration in the other sizes would give the same result
  • ChubbyChubby Posts: 2,956
    I also noticed very little, (if any) real improvement
    in actual performance.

    The theory is plausable Anne...I just didn't find it translated into actual results!

    Evans
    I spent most of my money on good bourbon, and bad women...the rest, I just wasted!!
  • My sense is that the raising of the grate creates significantly more space for air flow than is minimally blocked by 3 holes being blocked with the carriage bolts.

    The carriage bolts have not caused any problems with my regular removal of ash that falls below the firebox.

    Intuitive physics logic seems to support the idea of raising the grate using the carriage bolts.
  • FidelFidel Posts: 10,172
    But the assumption you have to make is that the fire grate would be the bottleneck for airflow. It isn't.

    If it were the bottleneck, then opening that area would lead to improved performance.

    Like I said, I tried it and noticed no difference in the way my eggs performed (medium and large). If it works for you, great.
  • Fidel wrote:
    I tried it and noticed no difference in the way my eggs performed (medium and large).

    Rod, I haven't found the urge to try to compare before and after after raising the grate. My assumption has been that it has to be an improvement...even if only minimally.

    My recollection is that some of the seasoned veterans here spoke up strongly that the raised grate improved air flow as expected.

    I'm surprised to now hear conflicting information.
  • FidelFidel Posts: 10,172
    That is precisely why I tried it - it came highly recommended by some respectable folks that frequent this space.

    Think about why it would work -- what does it do to make the egg function better? Are you having problems attaining high temps or maintaining low and slow cooks due to ash buildup? If so, then maybe it is a good idea. If not, then maybe it isn't something that is worth the effort. It wasn't for me.

    Besides, as stike will tell you, the zinc on the galvanized hardware will surely poison you at high temps. (this comment is SO tongue in cheek - please don't take this last one seriously)
  • DarnocDarnoc Posts: 2,661
    This was my modification of the bolts that I posted about two years ago.This has the advantage that when you come in with a wiggle stick you don't hit the bolts and get things out of alignment.

    spatchcockchicken329.jpg

    It is a easy matter to turn the washers in or out to give you the amount of air flow that you want.
  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    it's the stainless that can kill you. galvy fumes are harmless.(true)

    hahaha
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • danny285danny285 Posts: 360
    If you want more air flow and less plugging get yourself a TurboGrate. there is nothing like it and it will never clog up.
  • cookn bikercookn biker Posts: 13,407
    Peter, Peter, Peter, I have sooo been thinking of you. Just know, YOU have been missed.
    Don't bee sucha stranger, K?
    Molly
    Colorado Springs
    "Loney Queen"
    "Respect your fellow human being, treat them fairly, disagree with them honestly, enjoy their friendship, explore your thoughts about one another candidly, work together for a common goal and help one another achieve it."
    Bill Bradley; American hall of fame basketball player, Rhodes scholar, former U.S. Senator from New Jersey
    LBGE, MBGE, SBGE , MiniBGE and a Mini Mini BGE
  • cookn biker wrote:
    Peter, Peter, Peter, I have sooo been thinking of you. Just know, YOU have been missed.

    Molly,

    Er, I guess that's good...right??

    Thanks for the kind sentiments...I think!!
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