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Rack of Lamb

AronAron Posts: 170
edited 10:25AM in EggHead Forum
I've got 2 frenched (freedomed?) racks of lamb sitting in my fridge that I will be cooking tomorrow night. They are each about .75 lbs.
These came vacuum packed from New Zealand with the instructions "Cook at 180 degrees celsius for 30 minutes per 500 grams." I've converted this to approximately 350 degrees for 20 minutes for the .75 pound racks. Does this sound about right?
Should I do these indirect, direct, or direct on raised grill?
I should be receiving my 8 pack of dizzy pig samplers either today or tomorrow (can't wait) so I will try a different rub on each rack. Any suggestions of which two? Also--should I put them on directly, or coat the meat with anything and then rub on?
Thanks.
--Aron

Comments

  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,521
    Aron,
    Man those racks of lamb are goooood!!! Qsis, who took first place with rack-o-lamb in the "anything but" category at New Holland gave me some pointers. Sear them direct at 500-600 on your regular grate level for a couple minutes a side to get a nice crust, then roast them indirect to an internal temp of 125-130. Medium rare is as far as you wanna go with those beauts. Rest for 15-20 before cutting into them.[p]If I had to pick a Dizzy Pig rub, I would use cow lick, red eye, and or raging river...not too much though, as these cuts have a wonderful subtle flavor. A soy sauce based marinade with a little wine, lemon juice and fresh garlic is very good too.[p]Have fun. You are in for a treat!
    Chris

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
    Instagram: @DizzyPigBBQ
  • AronAron Posts: 170
    Nature Boy,[p]After the sear, do I take the meat out and let it rest while I allow the egg to drop in temp (shouldn't take too long if I add the plate setter to go indirect)? Kind of like T-rex method, but with an indirect component added? Or do I want to put them back on fairly quickly after the sear?
    --Aron

  • Nature Boy,
    To the marinade I'd add a little finely chopped rosemary.[p]grillin bill

  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,521
    Aron,
    Sure, you could set them out for a few minutes while you set up your indirect setup. I wouldn't worry too much about dropping the temp. Your main concern is protecting the meat from the direct heat so you don't burn them. Nice to have more than one cooker for stuff like this, but not necessary.[p]Let us know how they come out!
    Chris

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
    Instagram: @DizzyPigBBQ
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 22,867
    Aron, I have been doing boneless lamb roasts for a few years now similar to the TREX method. By accident I had dropped the roast into a camp fire while ice fishing when the rope supporting it caught fire. It took about 3 minutes to get it out of the fire, about 30 minutes to alter the fire and resupport the meat. this time hung the meat near the fire for a lower temp inderect cook. this was the best lamb roast i have ever eaten. For a rub I use pepper salt and fresh roasemary. I have not been able to let myself drop an expensive meat into a roaring fire yet but have had great luck with the TREX method on steaks , lamb loin chops, and 2 bone prime ribs.


  • Aron,
    I do alot of boneless legs o lamb and use a soy, red wine, garlic and fresh mint marinade that is quite good. Wish I had the recipe here but I'm at work.[p]A buddy of mine did a rack one time that he coated with heavy grain mustard and chopped fresh rosemary. It was awesome. I like my mint recipe, but rosemary and lamb go together very well. The mustard in this recipe made a nice crust.[p]As I read this message, it doesn't seem very helpful since I give no proportions - but you should be able to be a little creative and get some great results. Enjoy!

  • ColaCookerColaCooker Posts: 60
    Aron,
    Nature Boy's method is what I use. I cook them just like a steak. Sear both sides at high temp. for 2 mins. and then dwell for 4 mins. The only thing different is that I wrap the Frenched part of the bone with foil before I start otherwise they'll burn up and fall off.[p]Enjoy!
    Cola

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