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Red Eye Express Tri-tip

Joel FermanJoel Ferman Posts: 243
edited 10:55AM in EggHead Forum
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<p />Well if you guys have not made tri-tip on the egg yet, DO IT. I have been doing it for almost a year now, and it is by far my favorite thing to make on they egg, and around here you can pick up a 2lb tri-tip for about $4.50, and it'll feed 3 college guys (in sandwich form). About 1 hour on the egg at 350 or so, and this beaut was amazing. Added a touch of oak to the lump.
-Joel[p]P4300023.JPG[p]P4300024.JPG[p]P4300027.JPG[p]P4300028.JPG[p]P4300030.JPG[p]P4300031.JPG[p]P4300032.JPG[p]P4300033.JPG[p]P4300034.JPG[p]

Comments

  • Joel FermanJoel Ferman Posts: 243
    P4300029.JPG
    <p />Joel Ferman,
    Almost forgot, as you can see here I start with a GOOD sear on both sides, then I go with the indirect setup.
    -Joel

  • TxEggTxEgg Posts: 19
    Joel Ferman,
    I have been meaning to try a tri-tip. Your post may have just given me the needed extra encouragement. Your post brings a something I have been wondering. After a searing at 600-700*, can you place a cold platesetter inside to do an indirect cook? I am worried that I would crack my platesetter if it goes from ambient air temp to such a hot environment.

  • Joel FermanJoel Ferman Posts: 243
    TxEgg,
    I use cheapie firebricks. If you were so inclined, you could keep the plate setter in the egg while it warms up, and when it reaches around 450 degrees, take it out, get the temp up, throw the tri tip on, sear both sides for a minute or so, and then when you put the plate setter back on, it should still be pretty damn hot.
    -Joel

  • KennyGKennyG Posts: 949
    tritip.jpg
    <p />Joel Ferman,[p]I concur! [p]K~G

  • TxEggTxEgg Posts: 19
    Joel Ferman,
    Thanks, that's a good idea. I'll give it shot.
    Dean

  • AronAron Posts: 170
    TxEgg,
    Just be careful taking out a hot plate setter. I had been making flat bread (at around ) and then decided to cook chicken direct when I finished. Even with my heavy gloves, it was super hot. Be sure you have a safe place to put it down within close distance.[p]Aron

  • SSDawgSSDawg Posts: 69
    KennyG,[p]Did you cook that one direct? I am finding myself cooking without the plate-setter more and more these days.
  • KennyGKennyG Posts: 949
    SSDawg,[p]This one started with a 2 minute per side megawatt sear and then direct on a 400° Egg until finished. The pic is deceiving, it was a little more well done than it appears.[p]I used this meat in the chili I made at Waldorf. The plate-setter has its place for many cooks, but not for beef IMHO.[p]K~G

  • Mike in MNMike in MN Posts: 546
    Joel Ferman,
    That series of pictures just made my 16 year old nad I drool....almost brought tears to our eyes![p]Tri tip, I've never seen it in the store. Is it named anything else?[p]Mike in MN

  • BordelloBordello Posts: 5,926
    Mike in MN,
    Try the link and scroll to the bottom of the page. Hope it helps.[p]Cheers,
    New Bob

    [ul][li]Link[/ul]
  • djm5x9djm5x9 Posts: 1,342
    SSDawg:[p]Do you mean you are cooking more "direct" vs. “indirect”? If so, a couple of questions: 1 - Why do you find yourself making the change? 2 - What benefits or disadvantages have you noticed? 3 - Which cooks, in your opinion benefit most? 4 - Any additional comments on technique you care to share?
  • Mike in MNMike in MN Posts: 546
    New Bob,
    Thanks. We just don't see those in the stores that I shop at. I'll have to ask my butcher if he can get them. Then again, I don't see brisket either.[p]The 2 porterhouses I grilled tonight were just fine though.... Except my wife wasn't happy with me because I used a couple of chunks of hickory, and she doesn't like too much smoke. My son didn't complain![p]Mike in MN

  • WessBWessB Posts: 6,937
    Mike in MN,
    If I add any wood to my steak cooks, which I typically dont anymore, I prefer mesquite chunks. With the higher temps usually associated with a steak mesquite just seems to have a better effect IMO..give it a try sometime for yourself, your wife most certainly wouldnt care for it as it will give a smokier taste than hickory...Enjoy.[p]Wess

  • TxEggTxEgg Posts: 19
    Aron,
    Thanks for the warning, [p]

  • SSDawgSSDawg Posts: 69
    djm5x9,[p]Well, seeing as I go the idea from you, I doubt there is much I could tell you. You planted the seed, and the hassle involved in adding the plate setter, adding wood when the plate setter in on, etc. served as additional motivators. Have gone direct with every bird I've cooked over the past few months. The only things I've used the setter for are butts and ribs, but since I've raised my grill, I may try even those direct. Not sure yet, but I'll let you know.
  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,439
    RagingRiverSalmon.jpg
    <p />djm5x9,
    You have definitely been an inspiration to the advantages of direct cooking. I have been navigating my way to cooking direct a vast majority of the time. If I may....unsolicited as it may be....[p]1 - Why do you find yourself making the change
    Cuz the food often tastes and looks better. Because my hero, Darryl, advocates direct cooking.[p]2 - What benefits or disadvantages have you noticed?
    The fact that cooking direct, especially in the upper dome area, provides a cooking atmosphere with the characteristics consistent with indirect cooking. Heat is coming from all sides. With proper placement and fire control, you can enjoy the benefits of direct cooking....better crusting, more flavor from the Mallard Reaction, added flavor from the fat dripping on the coals....while at the same time the movement of hot air through the upper dome cooks the food from all sides (sorta like indirect heat would).[p]3 - Which cooks, in your opinion benefit most?
    I think chicken shines the most if you compare an indirect to a direct cook, but really almost all cooks could benefit at least some time sucking up some direct heat.[p]4 - Any additional comments on technique you care to share?
    For low and medium heat direct cooks, I like to get a roaring fire first, then choke it down to my target temp...often 275-300. The fire has less hot spots when you let all the coals get going first.[p]I think people who are stuck on the drip pan thing should at least play a little by trying things direct that they normally cook indirect. Try different things. WooDoggies cooked his Eggfest drumsticks at 250 or less direct for close to two hours. Lots to learn from that cook![p]And lots to learn from you, sir Darryl.
    Thanks for all you do!
    Chris[p]

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
  • WooDoggiesWooDoggies Posts: 2,390
    Damn Chris, great post.... I'm printing this one out.... and I hope that Wise One somehow incorporates this into his revised BGE Cookbook.[p]Yeah, I'm a Darryl fan, too...... he's has been a big influence on my approach to outdoor cooking.[p]PBR's
    John [p]

  • djm5x9djm5x9 Posts: 1,342
    SSDawg:[p]I would like to know your thoughts with ribs and butts direct. My motivation for asking the question was to find out if direct vs. indirect was working out well for you. By the way, there is a Bud in the "ice box" and soon to be vegetables in the garden should you stop by for a visit as the summer progresses . . .
    [/b]
  • djm5x9djm5x9 Posts: 1,342
    Chris:[p]LOL . . . Thanks for the kind words! Let me remind you that there are a great many Nature Boy posts (all in the archives for the ambitious) that I have printed out and periodically refer to for some excellent technique! Not to mention the spice mixing skills! Experimentation definitely does help hone the technique![p]By the way, I had some Bubba Burgers with Vidalia onions this evening. Compared to my excellent homemade burgers these store bought burgers were very good!
  • djm5x9djm5x9 Posts: 1,342
    WooDoggies:[p]Looking forward to the day I can share a Bud with you!
    [/b]
  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,439
    thanks John. Just a few thoughts from what I have learned the past few years...most of it learned right here on this board![p]I am with you on a self-invited mini fest at Darryl's Prncess Pad. Count me in.
    Chris

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
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