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lamb question

I realize this might be a simple question, but if a recipe says "butterflied leg of lamb" is one to assume that the bone has been removed? THanks in advance.
Seth

Comments

  • djm5x9djm5x9 Posts: 1,342
    Seth Howard:[p]Yes. I like to roll it back up and tie it for the cook and slice to serve. The usual Greek marinate with lemon, olive oil, oregano, salt, pepper, garlic for a few hours works well with this cut.
    [/b]
  • BlueSmokeBlueSmoke Posts: 1,678
    djm5x9,
    That's good. I also like to make any additional cuts needed to allow the leg to lay perfectly flat and grill it (after marinating in the mix you suggested).
    Ken

  • BlueSmoke,
    Ken,
    could you give me time and temp for when you do it this way please? I am shooting for med rare. thanks.
    seth

  • BlueSmoke,
    One more thing.... any wood for this cook, or straight lump?

  • RhumAndJerkRhumAndJerk Posts: 1,506
    Seth Howard,
    This was from Good Eats and looked great when Alton Brown cooked. I have not tried it.[p]JJ always cooks a great leg of lamb at the Eggfests. Maybe his recipe is posted around here, but I cannot find it.[p]Hope this helps,
    RhumAndJerk[p]

    [ul][li]Silence of the Leg O' Lamb [/ul]
  • djm5x9djm5x9 Posts: 1,342
    Seth:[p]If you used anything you should use something light like pecan, maple or fruit woods. I think I would try it with just lump the first time. You may find the grilled flavor to be enough on its own.
    [/b]
  • RhumAndJerk,Oh MAN... I've tried this paste/rub several times and it is fool-proof. Highly advised. I usually TRIPLE the amount of mint though. Also, due to the high sugar content, apply this paste no more than an hour before you start your fire. I like to totally debone the leg, liberally slather this paste over all surfaces, then tie it all up to make a nice uniform roast. I pull out of the egg when the Polder says 131F for a nice rare roast. Anything more than 134F is too done. Go for domestic lamb if you can get it and avoid the shank portion.[p]

  • BlueSmokeBlueSmoke Posts: 1,678
    djm5x9,
    Good suggestions, esp. the fruit woods. I'm partial to grape vine - just seems more in keeping with the "greek-ness."
    Ken

  • QBabeQBabe Posts: 2,275
    Seth Howard,[p]I'm kind of partial to cherry wood...did lamb for Thanksgiving that was great!
  • BlueSmokeBlueSmoke Posts: 1,678
    Seth Howard,
    Cooked flat (not rolled), indirect, I'd reckon about 45 mins to an hour at 250 to 275º. Animal Eater's got the internal numbers - 135º is plenty.
    Enjoy!
    Ken

  • MarvinMarvin Posts: 515
    BlueSmoke,
    Interesting. I do mine direct over a hot fire, 450-550. Slight char on outside; inside temp 135 as you suggest. I have not done it indirect over smoke; may be my next act. What I do do over a low,slo fire is lamb shoulder, cooked like a butt until the internal temp is 200. Outstanding if rubbed with Moroccan spices first and done with applewood smoke. Happy holidays.

  • Marvin,
    What do you do with the lamb shoulder? Pull it? Slice it? How much do they typically weigh? Is there a lot of fat?

  • MarvinMarvin Posts: 515
    Animal Eater,
    We usually slice it. When cooked lo-n-slo, the fat is dissolved into a drip pan just like with a pork butt also a shoulder). When served, there is little fat and wonderful flavor. Give it a try.

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