Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
Welcome to the EGGhead Forum - a great place to visit and packed with tips and EGGspert advice! You can also join the conversation and get more information and amazing kamado recipes by following Big Green Egg at:

Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Instagram  |  Pinterest  |  Youtube  |  Vimeo
Share your photos by tagging us and using the hashtag #EGGhead4Life.


In Atlanta? Come visit Big Green Egg headquarters, including our retail showroom, the History of the EGG Museum and Culinary Center!  3786 DeKalb Technology Parkway, Atlanta, GA 30340.

legs up vs. legs down

doublesuiteddoublesuited Posts: 13
edited 8:36PM in EggHead Forum
still a relative newbie here and just got my plate setter a few weeks ago. Am still trying to figure out when to use it legs up vs. legs down. I've searched a bunch of other threads and it seems like there is no consensus views.

I'm looking to cook three things indirectly over the next few weeks and would want input on whether to cook legs up or down (or even directly).

1. Turkey breast (not whole bird)
2. Thin crust pizza
3. Mac and Cheese


Thanks for you help,

Comments

  • RascalRascal Posts: 3,703
    Funny, I had that question concerning another issue... Oh well, I'll work it out... 8 - )
  • MaineggMainegg Posts: 7,787
    HI! I have found that legs down gives you more space between the fire and your pans or food. with your pizza stone on it legs down you really have some mass to heat up so give it a little extra time to do so. that is thick. yesterday I did legs up to give me more room to cook a turkey vertical. this dropped me down a few inches so I was not hitting the top. sometimes you just have to experiment and decide what works best for you. But think about what you are cooking and trying to archive. and post pictures, we all love pictures! Julie
  • BajaTomBajaTom Posts: 1,269
    Iuse the legs up when you need to use a drip pan. I use the legs down to cook pizza or to cook with a pot. Good luck, Tom
  • cookn bikercookn biker Posts: 13,407
    He he, We must both live in the gutter.
    Molly
    Molly
    Colorado Springs
    "Loney Queen"
    "Respect your fellow human being, treat them fairly, disagree with them honestly, enjoy their friendship, explore your thoughts about one another candidly, work together for a common goal and help one another achieve it."
    Bill Bradley; American hall of fame basketball player, Rhodes scholar, former U.S. Senator from New Jersey
    LBGE, MBGE, SBGE , MiniBGE and a Mini Mini BGE
  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    i like a little airspace between the barrier and whatever i'm cooking. generally i go platesetter legs up, with the grid on top. allows me to put a drip pan on the PS under the grid, too

    there's no consensus for good reason, though. there are just a number of various ways to set up each cook.
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • FlaPoolmanFlaPoolman Posts: 11,672
    :woohoo: :woohoo: Like you I had to read the post before it was removed :blush: Looks like the rest answered the question.
  • EggtuckyEggtucky Posts: 2,746
    Didn't read the other responses but here's how I'd use it..
    1. Legs up
    2. Legs down, then 'egg feet' holding pizza stone
    3. Legs up

    Here's the rule I use and it seems to have worked pretty well...if you want the egg to act more like an oven, then legs up. This creates a greater airspace between the hot platesetter and your dish creating a more even temp on top and bottom of your dish..if you want to brown the bottom of your dish, i.e. apply more heat to it, legs down. The platesetter is a heatsink and once heated to dome temperatures radiates heat to whatever is near it..make sense?
  • Eggtucky wrote:
    Didn't read the other responses but here's how I'd use it..
    1. Legs up
    2. Legs down, then 'egg feet' holding pizza stone
    3. Legs up

    Here's the rule I use and it seems to have worked pretty well...if you want the egg to act more like an oven, then legs up. This creates a greater airspace between the hot platesetter and your dish creating a more even temp on top and bottom of your dish..if you want to brown the bottom of your dish, i.e. apply more heat to it, legs down. The platesetter is a heatsink and once heated to dome temperatures radiates heat to whatever is near it..make sense?


    thanks. great post, makes complete sense.
Sign In or Register to comment.
Click here for Forum Use Guidelines.