Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
Welcome to the EGGhead Forum - a great place to visit and packed with tips and EGGspert advice! You can also join the conversation and get more information and amazing kamado recipes by following Big Green Egg at:

Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Instagram  |  Pinterest  |  Youtube  |  Vimeo
Share your photos by tagging us and using the hashtag #EGGhead4Life.


In Atlanta? Come visit Big Green Egg headquarters, including our retail showroom, the History of the EGG Museum and Culinary Center!  3786 DeKalb Technology Parkway, Atlanta, GA 30340.

Plugging the gap: MBGE fire ring

StanleyStanley Posts: 623
edited 4:10AM in EggHead Forum
Gandy Dancer had a thread going about SBGE and MBGE issues with getting to temperature, with speculation that it might have something to do with the gap between the fire box/ring and the inside of the Egg allowing air flow to bypass the combustion chamber. There were suggestions about plugging this gap with foil, etc., and some comment about difficulty keeping such a spacer in place. I may have missed a conclusion to this story, but my recollection is that there were some who had had positive results plugging this gap.

My MBGE gap is about 5/8" all around. One idea I've been bouncing around in my head is to fabricate a ring from sheet metal that would set between the fire ring and fire box (thus the weight of the ring would hold it in place). The outside diameter would match the inside diameter of the Egg body at the appropriate height. The inside diameter would be such that there would be enough overlap to allow the ring to hold it in place without protruding into the fire box area. This could be one solid "O", or (as I'm leaning toward) two half Os that would butt but not overlap when in place. The main reason for my two half Os thought is that I could fabricate with less wasted material. I would avoid galvanized SM just in case.

I have attempted a rudimentary sketch that I hope will give some idea what I'm thinking about. I welcome all thoughts. Thanks.
Rings.jpg

Comments

  • Clay QClay Q Posts: 4,435
    You can try stuffing heavy duty aluminum foil around the sides and top of the lower draft door between the egg wall and the fire box to help direct fresh air to the burning lump.
    Then fire up for a test run.

    Fire building, lighting techniques and lump brands are some factors to consider.
  • lowercasebilllowercasebill Posts: 5,218
    remember the coefficient of expansion of metal and egg ceramic are different. one of us put his c-i grid on the firebox, in contact with the walls of the egg...fired it up and split his egg. i would go with the 2 havlves, slip joint or leave room for expansion. just my 2¢
  • Ditto what bill said
  • civil eggineercivil eggineer Posts: 1,547
    I am still a little concerning with blocking the sidewall air circulation. Who knows, maybe that is partially responsible for keeping things moist when cooking. I would think the burning lump is what is drawing the air in as a direct stream to the combustion area and not around the outsides of the firebox. I suppose the buildup of heat would also cause a natural draft up the sides. Way to much thought, plug it with asbestos. :laugh:
  • fieroguyfieroguy Posts: 777
    Amen to what Frank said...

    Mike
    Wrens, GA
  • Beanie-BeanBeanie-Bean Posts: 3,092
    Stanley,

    Let me know if you need a guinea pig/tester for an SBGE...I'd be happy to test your device. I read about the max temp/gap thoughts and actually tried some foil the other day when I cooked some steak, and plugging the gap actually helped with the temps.

    Thanks,
  • Grandpas GrubGrandpas Grub Posts: 14,226
    Stanley,

    I havn't completed the 'plug' tests as of yet hence no further discussion (posts) have followed nor any conclusion as of yet. Actually what has been derived is more questions. More on all this later.

    I do need some information from other med/small egg owners who seem to be having preceved problems. Depending on thunderstorms & available time, I will do another test on the medium today or tomorrow.

    The split ring seems to be a good idea but that is going to be difficult for most forum members to fabricate and of course there will be the talk of types of material used & health issues.

    The metal 'O' is a good concept and would eliminate one big problem in my medium. My gap is large enough that other considerations need to be taken into account. The foil 'rope' idea is good and easy, however, gap is large enough that the 'rope' will quickly fall down in the egg.

    I am thinking/working on 2 more ideas lower down in the egg.

    GG
  • MACMAC Posts: 442
    YB has done this years ago with his fire rings. Check him out. You need to get the fire to the grate. He had the answer.
  • FrankCFrankC Posts: 414
    I still plan on doing exactly what you're proposing, with the exception of the material it's made of. I'm going to measure the inside diameter of my medium's top of the fire box, and then have a high temp ceramic gasket made next week. I'll let you know how it works.
  • PhilsGrillPhilsGrill Posts: 2,256
    How about this. Pull the firebox all the way forward and push the fire ring all the way to the back. That should cover up most areas. My .02
  • StanleyStanley Posts: 623
    Thanks for all of the responses, and thanks to Grandpas Grub for all his research efforts. Tonight I TRexed a rib eye on my MBGE. No modifications - just made sure it was relatively free of ash - poked around at the grate and firebox holes to make sure they were pretty clear. Ran up quickly to 300° dome and stayed there for a while (unfortunately, I wasn't timing). Maybe 10 minutes later the gauge started cranking and I had to put on the DFMT and close the draft to keep it from going nuclear while I got my steak ready. This is like it used to be in the old days (about 6 weeks ago :) ) when my Egg was new. Now I don't know if I need a gap filler. I'll still watch the results of GG's research with interest.
Sign In or Register to comment.
Click here for Forum Use Guidelines.