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Pork Shoulder Blade Boston Roast ???

greeneggonmyfacegreeneggonmyface Posts: 29
edited 1:40PM in EggHead Forum
Okay. I have been cooking for many years, but I still get confused by all the different names for cuts of meat.
This morning my local market had this on sale "pork shoulder blade boston roast" and I bought a 4.22lb cut. I also just got my large BGE about two weeks ago and have been lurking here ever since. I really want to cook this on the egg tomorrow evening but have no idea of how to do it. i am perusing the many recipes shared here and have the wonderful cookbook from Bill.
The trouble seems to be this. What the heck is this cut?! Is it a Boston Butt? Is this what you make bbq pulled pork from?
Please help! Thanks!!

Comments

  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,404
    greeneggonmyface,
    That be a boston butt. And yes, pulled pork is best from this cut. Sounds like a pretty small one. Is it boneless???[p]Anywho, you are prolly looking at 10 hours or so at 250, to reach 190-200 internal. Rest it for 15 -30 minutes, and pull away![p]Enjoy, and let us know how you make out!
    Chris

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
  • QBabeQBabe Posts: 2,275
    greeneggonmyface,[p]I just did my first one.... see the thread below called "RE: Pork Butt - Low and Slow - I DID IT!"[p]I've tried to put the link into the message, but it's my first attempt so let's see if it worked![p]QBabe
    :-)

  • greeneggonmyface,
    The advice you have gotten is good. I just finished a 7 pounder with bone in yesterday and always prefer it to the boneless. Use your v-rack and drip pan,although I know you already know that..Happy eating the best pulled pork you ever had...dips and/or sauces are such a prsonal thing I would not dream of offering a suggestion..lol...nde[p]

  • sdbeltsdbelt Posts: 267
    greeneggonmyface,[p]If you want to eat the pork shoulder for dinner tomorrow, you'll need to start your cook tomorrow morning, or even better, tonight.[p]A pork shoulder, even the rather small one that you have is best cooked at a low temperature over a considerable amount of time. What this does is render as much fat out of the meat as possible, and break down all of the connecting tissues in the meat, so that the meat is tender and relatively lean.[p]To prepare your butt, it's best to rub it with spices a day in advance of the actual cook. This allows the spices to sink in to the meat a bit. I've rubbed and cooked the same day, and it still tastes good, just not quite as good as otherwise.[p]For the cook, your best bet is to do it indirect. That means putting some type of heat buffer between the fire and the butt. I use my plate setter, and have also used fire bricks. On top of the heat buffer, put a drip pan. The rendered fat is going to drip into that pan, and not the fire.[p]If you don't have a way of going indirect, then just use a drip pan, and somehow suspend the butt above the drip pan. You don't want it sitting in its own juices, or the bottom 1/3rd won't come out correct. The BGE v-rack for ribs will work.[p]Again, the cook should be done at a pretty low temperature. Cooking at or just below 250 should be your goal. Keep the temp steady, and especially don't overshoot 250 when you first start up the Egg, as cooling a BGE is no simple task.[p]You'll want to use a Polder or other external meat thermometer to monitor the progress of your butt. This allows you to avoid ever opening the lid on your BGE. Opening the lid will allow all of the moisture to escape, and essentially defeats the benefits of a BGE over other cookers. Additionally, opening the lid can lead to "fanning the flames", which may cause the temp to shoot up...another hassle. Best advice: Don't open the lid![p]When the butt gets between 195 and 205 it's done. I've been removing mine at about 203 lately. [p]Let the butt sit inside for a while, so that it cools down and is easier to pull. Some wrap them in foil for quite a while during the cool down period, which allows the butt to slowly go through the "plateau" period again. This is the temp in which the connecting tissues break down, so it does seem like a good idea. I've not noticed a benefit with this myself, but it certainly doesn't hurt, and if you don't need the meat right away, it's definitely an excellent way to save the pulling for later in the day. You can stash it in the oven (off) or a cooler chest. Either way, that butt'll stay pretty warm for several hours wrapped in foil.[p]Enjoy![p]--sdb
  • sdbelt,[p]it must be the silly season, because I fell on the floor laughing as I read your post.[p]Best lines = "To prepare your butt it is best to rub it with spices...", " Let the (your) butt sit inside for awhile."[p]CB
  • sdbeltsdbelt Posts: 267
    chur buddy,[p]I aim to please. Glad you enjoyed it.[p]Beers![p]--sdb
  • BYCBYC Posts: 358
    greeneggonmyface,[p]Guys and Gals.....Being from the south and raised around butts I simply could not resist...I strongly recommend that you marinade or simply pour over the butts apple cider vinegar before applying the dry rub. It provides a distinctive flavor found only in the best southern BBQ. Also, as a dry rub use Tony's in the green canister. Lastly, half to three quarters of the way to doneness I always warp my butts in aluminum foil or place in a disposable aluminum pan and cover with tin foil. This allows all the flavors to be trapped within the meat, the pork will pull more easily, and clean-up is a snap. As a reference point for doneness. As the butt cooks it releases water thus the weight is reduced. When the butt is roughly half the starting weight you will know the butt is ready. In time, this measure of doneness will become second nature and you'll have no need for a thermometer. [p]Cheers.....BYC.....Back Yard Club

  • BYCBYC Posts: 358
    greeneggonmyface,[p]Guys and Gals.....Being from the south and raised around butts I simply could not resist...I strongly recommend that you marinade or simply pour over the butts apple cider vinegar before applying the dry rub. It provides a distinctive flavor found only in the best southern BBQ. Also, as a dry rub use Tony's in the green canister. Lastly, half to three quarters of the way to doneness I always warp my butts in aluminum foil or place in a disposable aluminum pan and cover with tin foil. This allows all the flavors to be trapped within the meat, the pork will pull more easily, and clean-up is a snap. As a reference point for doneness. As the butt cooks it releases water thus the weight is reduced. When the butt is roughly half the starting weight you will know the butt is ready. In time, this measure of doneness will become second nature and you'll have no need for a thermometer. [p]Cheers.....BYC.....Back Yard Club

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