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Nature Boy - A follow-up if you may on brisket....

Charcoal MikeCharcoal Mike Posts: 223
edited 6:18PM in EggHead Forum
Nature Boy -[p]Thank you very much for your reply, as it gave me much to consider. I do have a follow up question about your post to my brisket question from yesterday. You said:[p]"Another factor is how quickly the brisket dries out after it is cooked tender. Sometimes it is ready to pull off (when the polder probe slides in and out like butter) at 185 internal. Any further cooking will take you downhill."[p]Does this mean you always pull at 185? Or do you have another method you use to tell if the brisket is "cooked tender" - just the resistance of the polder probe? I have heard of others going as high as 210, and wanted to get a variation of opinions for my cook.[p]Thanks in advance, and cheers![p]- Mike[p]

Comments

  • Charcoal Mike,
    Some briskets will be ready at 185 others you will have to take to higher temps, it has to do with the fat content of the meat.
    A prime brisket will be pulled off the cooker at a lower internal temp than a choice or selct brisket.
    There is no always temp with BBQ, part of the fun.
    Jim

  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,508
    Charcoal Mike,
    Jim, as usual, gives you great advice. Man we are lucky to have him sharing his expertise with us![p]You said:
    Does this mean you always pull at 185? Or do you have another method you use to tell if the brisket is "cooked tender" - just the resistance of the polder probe? [p]Sometimes it needs to cook a bit higher than 185, but I start checking for tenderness in the 180-185 area. For me, the polder probe seems like the simplest method for judging tenderness. It is already in the meat, so you don't have to poke any new holes. And you can tell a lot by pulling and pushing it a little bit. You will know when it feels right! Rarely do I need to go to 200.[p]Chunk-o-chests to you.
    Chris

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
    Instagram: @DizzyPigBBQ
  • GrumpaGrumpa Posts: 861
    Nature Boy,[p]Could you explain the right "feel" of the probe when done? Would this apply to butts as well?[p]thx[p]bob[p]please email me too if you can :)
  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,508
    Bob,
    Kinda hard to explain, and some experiments and observations will help you. It should feel like you are poking a banana. There should be very little resistence.[p]We already have a "Bob" who posts here. Are you he?? Did not recognize your email address![p]email on the way.
    Beers!
    Chris

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
    Instagram: @DizzyPigBBQ
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