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Need house fire prevention help...

SweathogSweathog Posts: 75
edited 1:14PM in EggHead Forum
OK gang, I have a screened-in porch into which I would occasionally like to put my small egg to cook. The porch has a finished ceiling as the blurry pictures below demonstrate. The ceiling height is 9 feet. The small is in a nest, therefore, about 3 feet high. Is this a bad idea? Will I burn my house down? Will I mess up the ceiling and bring the wrath of Mrs. Sweathog? Inquiring minds want to know. Thank you for your support.

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Comments

  • DynaGreaseballDynaGreaseball Posts: 1,409
    I inquired about building an outdoor kitchen here in Charlotte. I was told I couldn't even get a permit if any cookers of any kind were to be located under a roof structure. My county wants us to move our cookers out in the open. Bummer, huh? Guess the Fire Dept. know though.
  • I don't think you would burn the house down however I do think the smoke might discolor the white trim
  • SweathogSweathog Posts: 75
    That's a good point that I had not thought of. Thanks.
  • Sweathog,

    I would not bring the egg into the porch area.

    Not only will it smoke up the trim, the smoke smell may stay forever.

    Potential buyer may think you had a fire therefore fire and water damage. IMHO
    Billy
    Wilson, NC
    Large BGE - WiFi Stoker - Thermapen - 250 Cookbooks

  • EggtuckyEggtucky Posts: 2,746
    Half the reason I screened in my porch was the hot tub..the other half was the cooking...I am working on a solution to the discoloration as I can see that will become an issue..but I find it no more unsafe than letting your wife cook with gas drunk!! :blink: ;)
    HPIM0004-1.jpg

    5a57574f.jpg

    Just be careful..keep the mesh screen closed..I cant 'officially' recommend it..but so far no problems for me...
  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,476
    Howdy Sweathog.
    The funny thing about fire is that it happens fast, and never like you think it could. I cooked in the same spot for 8 years (in my driveway 10 feet from the house) before I burnt my house down. Even then it was just a small stray ember, a little wind, and 15 minutes of not being right there. Sure, there was stuff nearby that could catch on fire, but, as the fire marshall said, everything had to be lined up perfectly (or imperfectly) for it to happen. Lots of folks cook on their decks and screened porches with no problems.

    And, for 8 years my spot was perfectly safe. Then one day my perspective changed. From now on I will cook more than 10 feet from my house, and there won't be anything nearby that can catch on fire.

    I won't tell you it isn't safe. It could be so long as you take every single possibility into consideration (flashbacks, grease fires, embers), and are watching it every minute.

    Sure looks like a great cooking spot on a rainy day though!! Those who know me will tell you I am not paranoid at all. But I wouldn't cook there unless I knew I could be there the whole time.

    Just one opinion!
    Cheers
    Chris
    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 28,780
    Chris,

    Amen brother.

    Steve

    100_0136.jpg
    100_0145.jpg

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • Celtic WolfCeltic Wolf Posts: 9,773
    I thank you for that reminder.. The Wolf Den plans are being changed again..
  • you have a perfect concrete patio for your egg. why do you want it under the roof in a screened in area? to protect you or the egg? i think if you'd ask people that have had their house burn, they would say they would rather get wet and bitten my mosquitoes than have their place burn down. consider the odds and the consequences. get a nice patio umbrella and a bug net hat.

    10 feet away from the house and direct the bottom draft door away from the house are pretty good rules for egg placement. even with a spark screen, burning hot embers can shoot out the bottom draft door and sparky lump will send spark fairies airborne.
  • Celtic WolfCeltic Wolf Posts: 9,773
    Considering that Chris's house burnt down almost three years ago and it's still not quite finished.. I'd rather get wet.
  • Grandpas GrubGrandpas Grub Posts: 14,226
    That's a beautiful spot.

    I would have to think at some point in time there will be smoke buildup on the ceiling/walls.

    Secondly, you have seen the pictures above with houses that have burned down.

    Even with the lower vent screen vent closed I have seen sparks spit out around or through the screen.

    My direct rear neighbor's house burnt down due to a charcoal grill on a patio. It took 10 to 15 minutes to engulf the house. The upper windows were blowing out like someone had put a bomb in those rooms. It took the fire department with 3 trucks about 2 hours to kill the fire and start the clean up.

    Good question, good post and responses. My eggs are on a cement patio but too close to the house.

    GG
  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,476
    You're welcome, man.
    Now is the best time to make changes!

    While you are at it, check and make sure your insurance is up to date. Building costs have skyrocketed, but what they cover you for doesn't go up as fast! (pretty smart on the insurance companys' part). Cool thing is, all you gotta do is tell them you need more coverage....and now is the time for that too!

    Dang...I did not even realize I was climbing up on a soap box. I'll get down now ;-)


    Safe cookin!
    Chris
    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,476
    Howz the rebuild comin' dude?
    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 28,780
    Chris,

    Long and slow man. I'm doing most of the general stuff because the general contractor doesn't seem to be getting things done. Rough in should be done in about three weeks and then drywall and then on and on and on. You know the drill man.

    Steve

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • FlaPoolmanFlaPoolman Posts: 11,672
    Good luck Steve. Hell of alot worse than my termites. My heart goes out to you & Chris as my rebuild was minor (no load bearing walls). Key I guess is pay attention not just to the cook but to the surroundings. It can happen anywhere.

    Pat
  • Angie2BAngie2B Posts: 543
    Eggtucky--Do you cook on that wooden floor with no protection? If I was you I would at least get one of those grill mats that hardwares sell. IMHO. :ohmy: :ohmy: :( :(
  • Angie2BAngie2B Posts: 543
    I need to move my eggs....they are way too close to the house. Thanks for the thread.
  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 28,780
    FlaPoolman,

    Appreciate the thoughts. The whole thing just gets a little old after a while. We'll be a year next month and we're not even close. Lived in five different places so far and you don't have your stuff.
    Not whining but it is avoidable and that should be what everybody thinks about. And as Chris said, make sure you're insurance reflects where you are right now.

    Steve

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • SweathogSweathog Posts: 75
    Y'all have me convinced. This is a REALLY bad idea. I like my house. I prefer it unburned. Thanks to everyone for your input. I guess my large could use company on the patio.

    Sweathog
  • FlaPoolmanFlaPoolman Posts: 11,672
    Appreciate the advice and I will definitely follow it. I hope it works out for you in the very near future.
    BEST WISHES TO YA

    Pat ( termites aint s*#) poolman
  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,476
    Best of luck man. Sounds like this fella needs a phone call every morning to make sure he's got the next guy lined up. And so on.

    Go get 'em man!
    Chris
    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,476
    Howdy Angie.
    Do keep in mind that even though my cooker was 10 feet from the garage, the door was open and the garage was chocked full of stuff. Plus I did not have the BGE bottom vent screen (highly recommended). Nobody is sure what the wandering ember actually ignited, but I am thinkin maybe it was a grocery bag full of newspapers to be recycled that was just inside the garage on the opposite side from the cooker...20 feet away. The vent was pointed toward that corner of the garage and the wind blew down through the top vent and the ember came out the 1/2 inch slit in the bottom. It was a freak thing.

    As far as I have seen, most fire officials recommend 10 feet from the house. Gas grill. Webers. George Foreman Grills. Eggs. Turkey Fryers. No reason for alarm, just be careful out there, and keep the area around you free of stuff that can catch on fire. Never hurts to know when the wind might be whipping up too. A calm day often becomes windy pretty quickly.

    As far as Sweathog goes, to me that looks like cooking inside the house, except there are screens instead of windows. And as non-conservative as I am, I would not do that!

    Sure sounds like I am still lookin for the soapbox, but just hope to prevent folks from unnecessary hardships!!

    Happy cookin
    Chris
    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,476
    Almost two years dude. And while not quite done, it's mo betta than befo.


    Still, you're right. You don't want it!
    Beers.
    Chris
    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
  • TXTrikerTXTriker Posts: 1,177
    I have a covered patio with pavers for a floor but I move my Egg out from under more because I don't want the smoke in the attic. I'm afraid the odor will remain forever in the insulation etc. and I'd never get rid of the smell.
  • Celtic WolfCeltic Wolf Posts: 9,773
    Got the insurance part covered. The Lightening Strike took care of that issue.
  • Angie2BAngie2B Posts: 543
    1.) My eggs are older and do not have the screen.

    2.)The Med is about a foot from the side of the house.

    I definitely need to move them.
  • EggtuckyEggtucky Posts: 2,746
    Well..actually I do have a mat being cut to size that I am sposed to pickup tomorrow...but I watch 'er pretty close, rarely do overnight cooks, and keep a fire extinguisher very handy.. and I don't want to minimize the risk cuzz I know there are folks like Chris who have suffered the ultimate catastrophe relative to this, but actually, about as likely that wiring in my hot tub will short out, or a lightning strike. The story is horrible and scary, but it is anytime anyone suffers that kind of catastrophic loss. I really see it as a pretty low risk. For instance, one of those weed burners or MAPP torches that I see some use on this forum could blow up in your hand.
  • Angie2BAngie2B Posts: 543
    Just concerned.....I reread my post and it may have sounded like I was yelling, but I wasn't, just worried about your safety.
  • EggtuckyEggtucky Posts: 2,746
    Oh no..I didn't take it that you were yelling and I appreciate your concern ;) thank you.
  • WileECoyoteWileECoyote Posts: 516
    This is a great thread. An interesting topic with factors which I had not previously considered. Just one of many examples why this forum and the members are so helpful.

    As a relatively new egger I hadn't really thought about where to place the egg. I figured it is thick ceramic and well insulated, with a covered dome and a heavy cast iron daisy wheel to stop anything from popping out, so I figured the odds of it starting a fire are pretty low or at least a whole lot lower than using a standard charcoal or gas grill.

    I still feel that way but the points raised in this thread made me realize the need for extra caution, especially when running wide open with the daisy wheel removed. I have indeed seen some flames and an occasional small spark come out the top of the egg when the wind shoots up through a fully open vent. So now I am planning on making a mesh screen cover for the top of the egg instead of running with it wide open.

    My cooking location varies based on the weather but it is always on a very large concrete driveway which is covered by an aluminum and steel carport ceiling. The carport is big enough for 3 full size cars with room to spare so the egg is almost always 5-10 feet from the house. I do have 23 acres of mostly wooded land on either side of the driveway, though, and the brush can get pretty dry during the summer heat so I need to be extra cautious about sparks during the summer and fall. I think it will actually reduce the risk of fire to keep the egg under the carport. The aluminum and steel roof should block most of the embers from floating high into the air and the concrete driveway should let them land and burn out harmlessly on the ground. Plus the carport shades the egg from high winds. The carport ceiling is white so it may get dirty but it is easy to power-wash as needed.

    So the only risk seems to be an ember which escapes the screens on the top or bottom vents, which would be very rare and have to be a very small spark, and then it would have to float at least 10' horizontally and land in a dry spot of grass or on the shingled roof of the house. Possible: yes. Likely: I think not, provided that I keep my screens in place. Also, the base of my egg will soon be mounted inside a table which will be enclosed on all sides with only a narrow opening for air in the front or side. So if a spark still manages to get out the bottom vent then it should die on the ceramic tile and metal shelf which are supporting the egg.

    Are there other risk factors or scenarios to worry about that would be unique to the egg, or that other users have found with large carports?
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