Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
Welcome to the EGGhead Forum - a great place to visit and packed with tips and EGGspert advice! You can also join the conversation and get more information and amazing kamado recipes by following Big Green Egg at:

Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Instagram  |  Pinterest  |  Youtube  |  Vimeo
Share your photos by tagging us and using the hashtag #EGGhead4Life.


In Atlanta? Come visit Big Green Egg headquarters, including our retail showroom, the History of the EGG Museum and Culinary Center!  3786 DeKalb Technology Parkway, Atlanta, GA 30340.

Need a Great Teryaki Sauce/Recipe

Smok'inCSISmok'inCSI Posts: 54
edited 10:42PM in EggHead Forum
Hi Guys:
I need a really great teryaki sauce recipe or bottled brand, Any Suggestions?
Thanks a million
mike

Comments

  • mb168mb168 Posts: 265
    Smokin'CSI,[p]I was just checking out some jerk sauces and found this sauce when you posted, haven't tried it though, Soyabi
  • RRPRRP Posts: 21,810
    IMG_0249.jpg
    <p />Smokin'CSI,
    It's hard to beat this brand! It is goooooooooooood stuff!

    L, M, S, &  Mini
    And oh yes...also a 17" BlackStone gas fired griddle! 
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
    Re- gasketing AMERICA one yard at a time!
  • mb168mb168 Posts: 265
    RRP,[p]I've never seen that, what is it? Looks like a rub through the bottle.
  • RRPRRP Posts: 21,810
    mb168,
    here you go - BTW I used to pay $7.99 for it and now Kroger carries it for $5.49

    [ul][li]product description[/ul]
    L, M, S, &  Mini
    And oh yes...also a 17" BlackStone gas fired griddle! 
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
    Re- gasketing AMERICA one yard at a time!
  • billtbillt Posts: 225
    Smokin'CSI,
    what are you doing with it ? is important.
    typically teriyaki is equal parts mirin,soy sauce and sake, alcohol boiled off. many recipes substitute sugar for the mirin or add sugar and often corn starch is added to thicken. dark sesame oil is often added. you can add garlic ginger lemon [for sea food]sesame seeds etc. you cannot go wrong with kikkoman products. beware of the others that have too many thickening agents link goes to a store bought one that is versatile.
    bill

    [ul][li]http://soyvay.elsstore.com/view/product/?id=28401&cid=1251[/ul]
  • RRP,
    grip

  • mb168mb168 Posts: 265
    mb168,[p]So it is chunky, garlic, ginger, and sesame seeds. The Yahoo shopping cart scares me a little bit with sites like that, have you bought from them before?
  • mb168mb168 Posts: 265
    RRP,[p]So it is chunky, garlic, ginger, and sesame seeds. The Yahoo shopping cart scares me a little bit with sites like that, have you bought from them before?
  • RRPRRP Posts: 21,810
    mb168,
    I have no need to buy it there as it readily available locally at Kroger grocery and I bet you can find it also. I used to get it at a speciality/candy/foods shop. It really is good but also more common than what you might think.

    L, M, S, &  Mini
    And oh yes...also a 17" BlackStone gas fired griddle! 
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
    Re- gasketing AMERICA one yard at a time!
  • Smokin'CSI,
    I always use Kikkoman Teriyaki Baste & Glaze. (Make sure it's the thick kind.) It's never let me down. Excellent on salmon - I actually cut up the salmon & put it in a freezer bag with this sauce & freeze it. Absolutely wonderful.[p]Cheryl

  • mb168mb168 Posts: 265
    RRP,[p]I'm buying a lot more online these days and less shopping in stores so I come across lots of sites and since getting the egg I search for related items, along with eating out less, I need to get out more. So if I find something I want even if it's a little more than in a store, it's easier to search online and combine it with a few other items than to search stores, plus I'm in a small town so the search is more difficult. but I do have a Kroger, have to check there.
  • mb168,[p]I've bought from them directly before - no problems - some of their products are at many groceries & also WalMart...[p]- Andy
  • RRP,[p]I'll second that - all the Soy Vey products are great - try the "Very Very Teriyaki" for sure - and also get the "Wasabiyaki" - it's fantastic on almost anything![p]- Andy
  • kecap manis (sweet soy) made with palm sugar is better than any teriyaki sauce I have ever had.

  • Smokin'CSI,[p]From America's Test Kitchen[p]Chicken Teriyaki
    from the Episode: Asian Chicken Classics[p]If you prefer to serve whole bone-in thighs and thereby skip the step of boning the chicken, trim the thighs of excess skin and fat, position the oven rack about 12 inches from the heat source, and increase the broiling time to 20 to 26 minutes, rotating the pan once halfway through the cooking time. This recipe was developed to work in an in-oven broiler, not the drawer-type broiler typical of older gas ovens. Mirin, a sweet Japanese rice wine, is a key component of teriyaki; it can be found in the international section of most major supermarkets and in most Asian markets. If you cannot find it, use 2 tablespoons white wine and an extra teaspoon of sugar. If desired, low-sodium soy sauce can be used in place of regular soy sauce. Serve with steamed rice, preferably short grain.[p]Serves 4 to 6
    8 bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs (about 5 ounces each), trimmed, boned, and skin slashed (see illustrations below)
    Table salt and ground black pepper
    1/2 cup soy sauce
    1/2 cup sugar
    1/2 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
    1 clove garlic , minced or pressed through garlic press (about 1 teaspoon)
    2 tablespoons mirin
    1/2 teaspoon cornstarch [p]
    1. Position oven rack about 8 inches from heat source; heat broiler. Season chicken thighs with salt and pepper; set thighs skin side up on broiler pan (or foil-lined rimmed baking sheet fitted with flat wire rack), tucking exposed meat under skin and lightly flattening thighs to be of relatively even thickness (see illustration 6). Broil until skin is crisp and golden brown and thickest parts of thighs register 175 degrees on instant-read thermometer, 8 to 14 minutes, rotating pan halfway through cooking time for even browning.[p]2. While chicken cooks, combine soy sauce, sugar, ginger, and garlic in small saucepan; stir together mirin and cornstarch in small bowl until no lumps remain, then stir mirin mixture into saucepan. Bring sauce to boil over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally; reduce heat to medium-low and simmer, stirring occasionally, until sauce is reduced to 3/4 cup and forms syrupy glaze, about 4 minutes. Cover to keep warm.[p]3. Transfer chicken to cutting board; let rest 2 to 3 minutes. Cut meat crosswise into 1/2-inch- wide strips. Transfer chicken to serving platter; stir teriyaki sauce to recombine, then drizzle to taste over chicken. Serve immediately, passing remaining sauce separately.[p]

Sign In or Register to comment.
Click here for Forum Use Guidelines.