Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
Who’s ready for September? We’re ready as ever for football season! Check out our tailgating page for recipes that are great to bring to a tailgate, or cook at home if you’re entertaining friends during a game. Either way they’re sure to become a fan favorite! We couldn’t forget about Labor Day...we have recipes and cook out ideas to celebrate the long weekend no matter what you’re doing. And lastly, be sure to cook up a batch (or five) of bacon for National Bacon Day! We can’t wait to fall into cooler weather with you!

Big Green Egg headquarters has moved - come visit our new showroom and check out the museum and culinary center too! 3786 DeKalb Technology Parkway, Atlanta, GA 30340

Tri-Tip advice

edited 7:52AM in EggHead Forum
I have been doing my tri-tips by givin' a good hot sear at high temp then closing the air down to let 'em dwell. One of the links posted a bit ago talked about doin 'em low and slow. Anybody have any advice or a preference before I possibly ruin one in front of the neighbors. Thanks

Comments

  • WessBWessB Posts: 6,937
    Thor,
    Never done one..or for that matter even seen one where I shop..am looking forward to others responding to this post..good question..[p]Wess

  • Thor,
    all I know is there big and probably started in the Pacific northwest. Simple spice as salt and pepper is the norm. Also
    Oak wood is the wood for these babies. Good luck. Low and slow is the way..250 maybe for 45 or so minutes I'm guessing.

  • Thor,[p]It really depends on how much smoke flavor you like in your meat. If you grill a tri-tip, you won't end up with much smoke flavor. Since I love smoke flavor and don't necessarily care about a "seared" exterior, I always cook my tri-tips at 250. You might want to try one grilled and one low-and-slow and see which you like the best.[p]

  • Mardi,
    Thanks...that's kinda what I was wonderin' It seems since it is not a very big piece of meat that a low-n-slow wouldn't necessarily tenderize it any more,(not long enough to break it down, i.e pulled pork style).

  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,354
    Thor,
    Check this recipe. It is a winner. It takes time to do as prescribed (with all the marinade time), but simple seasonings will work as well. The guy who posted this recipe can really cook. Enjoy.
    NB

    [ul][li]Bill's Tri Tip[/ul]
    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,354
    Thor,
    If you want more smoke flavor, try sticking in the freezer for an hour, then smoking the partially frozen meat at 180-225 with a good dose of smoke for 30 minutes or so. Remove the meat (should still be uncooked, but smoked a bit), and bring your cooker back up to searing temps. Grillin Bill's cooking temp (which I linked to in my last post) works well...but I s'pose it is similar to the sear/dwell method you have been using. The half-hour of smoke with the cold meat really makes a difference.[p]For even extra smoke flavor, chill the meat overnight after your initial smoke![p]Just some thoughts.
    NB

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
  • Thor,
    I cook a 3 lb tri tip at 250-275 for four hours if thawed or five hours if frozen. Cover with mustard then apply your favorite rub. They are great. tstick

  • Thor,
    I wouldn't worry about trying to get the Tri-Tip to the tender stage. It is already a tender piece of meat.[p]Depending on your likes, you could grill it real fast and
    have it tender or lo and slo and it would still be tender! However, a lo and slo would tend to dry it out, I believe. Tri-Tip, if you look closely, has "Grill Me" tattooed on each tip.[p]Since this cut is essentially a roast, and can be steaked out, don't commit sacrilege by trying to "...break it down.."[p]Pete

  • Char-WoodyChar-Woody Posts: 2,642
    Sespe Pete, Good tips..er Tri tips..er both..!
    C~W[p]

Sign In or Register to comment.