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To soak or not to soak...

HurricaneJamesHurricaneJames Posts: 17
edited November -1 in EggHead Forum
that is the question... whether 'tis nobler... oh wait...[p]Just some questions about heavy/light smoke at high and low cooking temperatures.[p]What produces the most smoke at high temps?
At high temperatures, is it better to use soaked chunks, soaked chips, dry chunks, or dry chips for maximum smoke?
If you wanted a more subtle smoke flavor, what would you use?[p]What will get you the most smoke at low temps for things like pulled pork?
If you just wanted a little smoke flavor at low temps, what then?[p]Thanks!
James

Comments

  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,243
    HurricaneJames,
    What produces the most smoke at high temps?
    For high temp stuff, start with cold or partially frozen meat, and smoke at low temps (180-225) with the meat on the opposite side from the coals. Remove after 20-30 minutes (should be only very slightly cooked). Then bring the cooker up to your cooking temps, and add meat back for the cook.[p]At high temperatures, is it better to use soaked chunks, soaked chips, dry chunks, or dry chips for maximum smoke?
    I use chunks whenever possible, and don't soak them. Just my preference.[p]If you wanted a more subtle smoke flavor, what would you use?
    Cherry, Alder, Mulberry, Sugar Maple, Apple and other fruitwoods. One or two chunks is all you need for a good light smoke.[p]What will get you the most smoke at low temps for things like pulled pork?
    Put your cold meat on the smoker right after you have a healthy core fire, at about 180-200 dome. Add 2 or 3 chunks right into the core fire, and a few more several inches away that will smoke as your fire progresses.[p]If you just wanted a little smoke flavor at low temps, what then?
    Use one chunk of the milder woods I mentioned above.[p]Just some thoughts. Play around with different things, and have fun!
    NB

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
  • HurricaneJames,
    I keep a stock of pre-soaked chips that provide lots of smoke and lots of flavor. I mix and match different chips for different flavor combinations and soak them in beer, wine, or hard cider for weeks or even months. Simple formula, fruitwoods with wine or cider, other hardwoods with beer. Stay away from green bottled beers, unless you like that skunky flavor. Bear in mind though, that whatever smoking woods and soaking methods you use, whether its chips or chunks or tea leaves, will only impart subtle influences as most of the smoke flavor comes from the lump itself.
    Side note: my dog got it between the eyes from a skunk a month ago, the whole house smelled like Heineken for 2 weeks.

  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,243
    TOROLNSTND,
    I always wondered why so many brewers use light-leaking green and clear bottles....especially the imports that travel so far. Still scratching my head...they must know brown is better. I guess they would rather have the packaging identity than fresh beer![p]I will have to try some cider or beer soaked wood chunks. Sounds interesting!
    Cheers
    NB

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
  • Char-WoodyChar-Woody Posts: 2,642
    TOROLNSTND, I laughed...Great post, and your pup brings back memories... Hand bathed outside in about 5 quarts of home canned tomato juice, then scrubbed 6 times in dog shampoo, and still every time she got wet..the odor would present itself...We took wide detours whenever old man stripes walked across our former acreage...!
    I have some Hienekens..now I wonder about finishing it. :-)
    C~W

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