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Using Liquids in a Drip Pan

edited 10:47AM in EggHead Forum
Is it advisable to use liquids in the drip pan to add moisture and/or flavor to meats? I'm a new BBQer and BGE owner. I know it's a bad idea to use water to cool down the fire, but what about using water or a flavorful liquid mixture in a drip pan?

Comments

  • Andy M.,
    Over the weekend, I used beer and water (50/50) in the drip pan for a boston butt with delicious results.[p]I am a relatively new member of the egg family -- I purchased my first egg last september. Don't be afraid to ask questions -- even the silly ones -- as you'll save yourself alot of time. More than likely, someone else has tried what you thinking about and can give you some great tips![p]Check back often![p]B~F

  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,508
    Andy M.,
    People here seem to go both ways. Many use dry drip pans elevated by spacers to prevent burnt drippings. I am partial to using liquid in my drip pans. Liquid goes in my pan for most of my indirect cooking of chicken pieces, ribs, country ribs, briskets and butts. [p]Your call. You don't really need the moisture, as the egg is pretty good at holding moisture. I like it because I never have to worry about drippings burning and adding too much smoky fat flavor to my meat. [p]As far as beer and flavorings in the liquid, I have done that also, and IMO it adds very little, if any flavor to the meat. But that is just my opinion (I haven't done a side-by-side test). [p]Welcome to the group. How long have you had your BGE??[p]NB

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
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  • JimWJimW Posts: 450
    Andy M.,
    I egged a duck over the weekend over a drip pan on a pizza stone. I didn't put any liquid in it, just used it to catch the drippings off the duck for use in some gravy. The duck and the gravy were great BTW.[p]I agree with the other posts that the added water/liquid in the drip pan doesn't really do much. As above I use the drip pan primarily to keep the stuff off the coals and/or to use the drippings in something.[p]Unless you're using a throwaway drip pan, I recommend that you line it with heavy duty foil.[p]JimW

  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,508
    JimW,
    I guess it depends what temp you use. When I tried the drip pan on pizza stone the drippings burnt and smoked profusely. It really messed up the flavor of the chicken. I was told spacers would have prevented this.[p]I have been using the same set of throwaway drip pans since July. I line it with foil. They are pretty crinkled, but still work fine after many many uses.[p]NB

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
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  • JimWJimW Posts: 450
    Nature Boy,
    I forgot to mention that I used 3 firebricks under the pizza stone. There was a little burned stuff but not much. Incidentally, I used a duck recipe I picked up here, from Gretl I think.
    JimW

  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,508
    JimW,
    That would make a difference!
    If I might inject an observation. That sounds like a great deal of mass. Seems like EITHER a pizza stone OR the firebricks would suffice (of course you might need spacers under the drip pan). Although you got good results, the extra mass used up a lot of lump, and increased your whoosh potential. Just some thoughts and opinions.[p]I am a big duck fan, but have not cooked one yet!!
    NB

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
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  • CatCat Posts: 556
    Andy M.,[p]Welcome to the wonderful world of Q, and to the BGE family.[p]Liquid in the drip pan will add neither flavor nor moisture to the meat. Water in the pan does provide a heat buffer for indirect cooking; because the water can't go over 212 degrees, the bottom of the meat won't scorch or burn.[p]Cathy[p]
  • I don't know if liquids in a drip pan add any flavor to meat, but if you're using beer in a drip pan, at least you have an excuse for opening a couple of beers. ("One for me, one for the drip pan.") :-)

  • GretlGretl Posts: 670
    Nature Boy,
    I have had problems in the past with the drip pan under the vertical poultry roaster (chicken sitter?) with the drippings burning and smoking. For that reason, I'd recommend some liquid in the drip pan. However, not using a buffer beneath the drip pan, often the liquid burns away and the drippings burn. Even using the pizza stone alone wasn't enough for me.[p]But here's a coincidence: last night while I was making dinner (indoors, sorry!) Jim came home and lit the BGE thinking that I wasn't home yet and I'd appreciate the fire. I had a whole chicken in the fridge, unbrined and unadorned with anything, which I promply washed, dried and slathered with olive oil and salt and pepper. Period. I popped it on the Eiffel Tower and set it in a drip pan placed on my thin pizza stone which was set on two thin firebricks. I put about a cup of white wine in the drip pan. My pizza stone is very thin. The firebricks I have are two thicknesses, and I used the thin ones (about 1 1/2 inch). I think that's the right thickness for what I need. End of story:[p]When the Polder reached 180, I took the birdie out and it was perfect. And more exciting, the drippings were also perfect for gravy-making. I wrapped the chicken and refrigerated it; the drippings are also in the fridge, and the fat solidified for easy removal and good gravy-making. I am looking forward to Virgin Leftovers for dinner tonight.[p]Cheers,
    Gretl

  • sprintersprinter Posts: 1,188
    BluesnBBQ,[p]Being kinda' generous to that drip pan arent you?[p]Troy
  • dan cdan c Posts: 31
    Gretl,
    Me too. The best bird I've cooked has been olive oil/salt pepper "rub". Makes for a great golden, tasty skin. I don't cook indirect, though. Hmmm...I don't get gravy either ;(
    I guess I too will have to try again...

  • sprinter,[p]I forgot to mention that the drip pan gets the Budweiser and I get the Guninness! :-)
  • BluesnBBQ,
    Be careful when you speak of the King of Beers.[p]B~F

  • sprintersprinter Posts: 1,188
    Bama Fire,[p]You're right, we should speak kindly about the "King of Beers"[p]GUINNESS STOUT[p]Nuff said[p]Troy
  • Actually, I enjoy Guinness and Budweiser. I prefer microbrews and imports, but I like the occasional Bud or Rolling Rock too (my beer snob days are long over!).[p]Here's an off-topic (but related joke): The presidents of Budweiser, Miller and Guinness are having lunch together at a brewing convention. The president of Budweiser orders a Bud. The president of Miller orders a Miller. The president of Guinness orders a Coke. When the other two presidents ask him why he didn't order a Guinness, the Guinness president says "If you guys aren't going to drink beer with your meal, either am I." :-)
  • RhumAndJerkRhumAndJerk Posts: 1,506
    Cat,
    That is cool, I have never thought of the stable temperature of water that way, but it does stand to reason. [p]Although, it would seem to me that steam from drip pan liquid should carry some flavoring attributes similar to smoke. It may just be that the smoke overpowers any flavor in the steam.[p]Personally, I almost always add a liquid to drip pan and in some cases, beer. When I do EW’s Pulled Pork, I put a cup of his vinegar sauce in the drip pan. Other times, I will use the water that used to soak the wood chunks in; it just seemed wasteful to throw it out.[p]Happy Smoking,
    RhumAndJerk[p]

  • Mr BeerMr Beer Posts: 121
    BluesnBBQ,
    You need an excuse to open a couple of beers???? :-) !!

  • Cat, you are correct as far as my experience is concerned. I useta use a conventional smoker that suggested using wine in the pan below the meat. It never made any difference in taste of of the meat. In fact,, I think it hindered my attempts of acheiving and maintaining the desired temp. AND BESIDES,,, I couldda drank that. What a waste.. Now it WILL help keep the drippings from sticking to the pan,, but that's all. I now use throw-away aluminum pans to catch drippings and act as an indirect barrier. MOISTURE? Forgitaboutit! If you are cooking on an EGG,, that is taken care of automatically. DON'T OPEN THE DOME UNLESS ABSOUUULUTLY NECESSARY.. IMHO!

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