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Rib-eye Roast--Suggestions?

Big MurthBig Murth Posts: 350
edited 9:27AM in EggHead Forum
Before all the hardcores skidaddle for Waldorf, I'd like to beg everyone's indulgence again: Have had a 6lb. ribeye Roast in the freezer for some time--need to Egg that bad boy, now!! Love to hear your suggestions for prep, temp 'n times, direct/indirect, use the Polder(?), etc. Also, having had some wonderful steaks with minimum of smoke/flavor woods on the Egg, what are your thoughts about wood, if any? Thank you ladies and gentlemen...and to all of you headed to Eggfest
we hate you!! Not.
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Comments

  • SpinSpin Posts: 1,375
    Big Murth,[p]An ribeye roast is a prime rib with the outer meat layer and internal fat layer removed, thus any prime rib cooking technique will work well with only a minor shortening of the anticipated cooking time.[p]As the meat is excellent with no prep, I would suggest using a prep that lets the meat shine. A simple prep of kosher salt and fresh cracked pepper will do wonders. A light coating of canola oil with some minced onion and garlic in it for an overnight marinade will add a delicate flavoring. Dry the meat well with paper towels prior to the salt/pepper addition. Dry meat naturally browns better than wet meat.[p]I like to cook this meal direct at 250°F, flipping it around every 45 minutes to expose all sides to the direct fire - ending with the bone side down.[p]If you choose to use a drip pan, space the roast up to set above the side lips of the pan as this allows a better cooking of the lower side (CW taught me this). If the crust is less than what you want (give a look 10-15°F before reaching done temp), remove your polder and open both vents wide to raise the heat to finish the crust.[p]Cook to 135°F internal and remove to under tented foil for a 15 minute rest before slicing.[p]Spin
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  • Big MurthBig Murth Posts: 350
    Spin,
    Thanks for your response. Do you like to use a V-rack on a direct with this cut? Any thoughts on flavor woods---I've got many different varieties from cherry to apple, J.Daniels Barrel bits to pecan, maple, etc. Or should I just let her cook sans wood? By the way, how far and where should the Polder be positioned in the roast? Thanks pard!

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  • Big MurthBig Murth Posts: 350
    Spin,
    By the way, any rule of thumb on time, e.g., minutes per pound @ 250 direct? Gracias!

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  • SpinSpin Posts: 1,375
    Big Murth,[p]A v-rack would work with the exception of facing the ends of the cut downward. I cook directy on the grill. A firebrick can be useful as a prop for those times when the cut doesn't want to rest quietly on the side you have chosen to face the fire :-). [p]I seldom use a smoke flavoring, but a light application of JD chips early in the cook is nice. Red oak is also very good.[p]The polder should read internal temps of the very center of the meat. I add the polder after the turning/searing process is completed. I insert it in the end of the cut as it is easier for me to judge the position of the tip this way, and provides a solid insertion.[p]Timing tends to be 40-50 minutes/lb. Planning the finish to be early allows you the luxury of cooking the meat longer if it wants. Tent in foil and cover with a towel to preserve the heat if finished early. I have prepared a 15.5 lb ribeye roast for transportation and served it 4 hours later. It was still steaming and juicy (removed at 130°F to a preheated cooler and wrapped in towels).[p]Spin

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  • SpinSpin Posts: 1,375
    Spin,[p]BTW, if you use a firebrick as a prop, it may make your dome temperaure drop. Don't adjust your vents to compensate as the brick will be removed shortly and you already have adjusted the vents for proper dome temp. The meat is only proped to sear each side and the fire will still sear.[p]Spin

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  • ShelbyShelby Posts: 803
    Spin,
    I've done several rib-eye roasts on my webber but have yet to do one on the egg and looking forward to it.[p]You didn't say...is it bone-in or boneless?[p]I agree with Spin on the prep of the meat.
    I always start and cook with the fat/bone side up so that any juice will run down and thru the meat. [p]But do have a question for you Spin: what would be you thoughts on searing the roast for a minute or two on either side, then dropping the temp, the way you'd do a steak?

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  • SpinSpin Posts: 1,375
    Shelby,[p]I have done that. The problem is getting the Egg back down to cooking temp after searing the meat. This can take a while unless two Eggs are involved. The longer, lower cook seems to produce an equivalent crust.[p]Spin

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  • Char-WoodyChar-Woody Posts: 2,642
    Spin, if I can insert a thought here, I also have done that with no problem. Sear the standing on all sides, at the high temperature 700+. The Standing rib will turn into a ball of flame, so be very careful in turning the roast. Once the roast is seared for a few minutes per side, set the rib roast bone side down and fat side up if there is one, close bottom vent to a 1/4 inch, Daisy on at full opening and let the egg settle down to 350 and then watch to readjust the vents to maintian 300 to 350 for the rest of the cook. Internal to no more than 140F..or take out at 135F and tent for 15 or 20 minutes..Then enjoy.
    Plain salt and ground peppercorn for the seasoning and it leaves the flavor of the meat to enjoy.
    One can do the entire cook at 350 indirect. Lots of variables.
    Cheers to ya and if your going fest...enjoy!
    C~W[p]

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  • Big MurthBig Murth Posts: 350
    Char-Woody,
    Thanks to you, Spin, Shelby and a couple of other Eggers who emailed me direct for tips on the big Ribeye. Ques: Spin does his at 250 and figures around 45min. per lb. This baby's six pounds and I'm not sure I can drink that much vodka in that stretch. Your 350 temp.cook takes you how long?--in your esteemed estimation and recollection.
    Thanks to all again!!

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  • Char-WoodyChar-Woody Posts: 2,642
    Big Murth, about a hour to hour and a half...Anthony up North just did one the other day as prescribed. He wouldn't have it any other way..Yell at him..He is home tonight :-)
    C~W[p]

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