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dumb question time 8^)

edited November -1 in EggHead Forum
Spin has brought up the idea of using ghee or clarified butter. Do you just use one of those "seperator-cuppy-things" that allows you to pour from the bottom instead of the top? What do you do with the rest of the solids and stuff rendered out? Just pitch or is there a use for that? How much ghee does one stick produce? And lastly, must it be unsalted butter to start with? ^oo^~

Comments

  • RhumAndJerkRhumAndJerk Posts: 1,506
    one feral kat,
    Yes, you must use unsalted butter. You are concentrating some flavors and regular salted butter will not work. Salt is added to butter as a preservative. This is another manner of preserving butter. Once the milk solids are removed, you are left with butter oil. The milk solids are what will spoil and go rancid. [p]The remaining milk solids have no use. They have served their purpose well and should be tossed into the trash. They resemble the sludge found in the bottom of a deep fryer, just not as black. [p]To strain the milk solids out, I use a standard strainer lined with paper towels. I have cone type oil filters that I could use. You could also simply use a coffee filter.[p]YB posted a link about ghee that suggests that one pound of unsalted butter yields about 1.5 cups of ghee. I make two pounds of unsalted butter and get almost a quart mason jar full.[p]Hope that helps,
    RhumAndJerk

  • SpinSpin Posts: 1,375
    one feral kat,[p]Unsalted butter is sweeter than salted butter. I like to add my salt to taste, and anything else that adds the salt for me tends to complicate the cook.[p]Clarifying butter involves melting the butter in a small sauce pan (so there is some depth to the liquid) and heating to the point that the milk fat separates from the butter (much lower temp than a simmer). The milk fat will form in loose clumps, clinging to the bottom and sides of the pan.[p]I use a small ladle and some patience to remove the clear liquid and avoid disturbing the milk fat. I don't know of any use for the leftovers.[p]A pound of butter makes about a cup of clarified butter. The clarified butter keeps as well as normal butter (and maybe a bit longer).[p]Spin
  • RhumAndJerkRhumAndJerk Posts: 1,506
    Spin,
    I am sorry that I confused the issue. [p]There is a difference between clarified butter and ghee. Sometimes I get too excited with a great idea. I will try your method of clarifying butter the next time.[p]I still say that your idea was incredible.[p]Happy Grilling,
    RhumAndJerk

  • SpinSpin Posts: 1,375
    RhumAndJerk,[p]No apology necessary. You actually explained a much better method of obtaining the most butter oil from the raw butter (ghee or not). I tend to be a bit lazy and am willing to chuck some in the process. :-}[p]Thanks for explaining why salt is added to butter to begin with. It never made any sense to me.[p]Spin
  • RhumAndJerkRhumAndJerk Posts: 1,506
    Spin,
    The show Good Eats on FoodTv did a half hour special on butter. I was amazed at the information. They did not mention ghee however.
    RhumAndJerk

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